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I may be naive but I thought the BBC wildlife documentary was shot in the wild

Community Veteran
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Registered: 15-06-2007

I may be naive but I thought the BBC wildlife documentary was shot in the wild

http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20827885.600-wildlife-filmmaker-everybodys-faking-it.html
Quote
What proportion of wildlife programmes contain staged or non-wild elements?
It's hard to put a figure on it, but far more than most people realise. It's virtually impossible to make a wildlife film without some fabrication, manipulation or audience deception. Staging - making something "natural" happen artificially - is a short cut used to film otherwise inaccessible events. David Attenborough's BBC documentary Wildlife Special: Polar Bear showed a mother bear supposedly giving birth in the wild. He later admitted that the scene was shot in a zoo.
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Community Veteran
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Registered: 10-09-2010

Re: I may be naive but I thought the BBC wildlife documentary was shot in the wild

You should watch the final 10 minutes of every "Human Planet" episode, where they go into detail about how the filmed certain sections, it's plainly obvious that they must fail to get what they want and need fairly often.
Your right, they seem to always portray what your seeing as the "wild" truth, but it's almost impossible to record the truth, not because it doesn't exist, but because the luck, time and skill needed to capture the truth mean its probably impossible to fill say a 10 episode, 1 hour long, documentary program with the truth unless your prepared to spend perhaps 200,000 plus man hours just shooting, let alone production etc.
Just to show my maths are not wild...  based on what I've seen on Human Planet.  5 man crew, 21 day assignment, never off duty, may or may not get the footage wanted to fill 5 x 10 minute segments = 12,600 man hours just for the film crews. 10 episodes is 126,000 man hours, plus prep and planning, plus editing, plus voice over, etc etc
nadger
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Registered: 13-04-2007

Re: I may be naive but I thought the BBC wildlife documentary was shot in the wild

We always enjoy programmes that spend the last 10 minutes showing how they've achieved certain shots. I don't really think that "staged" shots spoil wildlife documentaries - without them the cameramen could spend the rest of their lives just waiting  Wink
Steve
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Re: I may be naive but I thought the BBC wildlife documentary was shot in the wild

Noticed that The Human Planet has been re-leased on DVD, I saw It In Tesco, I think I am going to buy It as I still haven't watched them all.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B004EPYSB4/ref=asc_df_B004EPYSB42144835?smid=A3P5ROKL5A1OLE&tag=googlecou...
alanf
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Registered: 17-10-2007

Re: I may be naive but I thought the BBC wildlife documentary was shot in the wild

Video of David Attenborough's Michael Faraday Prize Lecture 2003 to the Royal Society discusses "deception" in wildlife programmes. When I viewed it some months ago I found it an hour well spent.
Perception, deception and reality
Sir David Attenborough CH CVO CBE FRS
Michael Faraday Prize
28 January 2004, 68 minutes
http://royalsociety.org/Prize-lectures-events/#