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How about Mis-pronounced words....

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Grafter
Posts: 19,757
Registered: ‎30-07-2007

Re: How about Mis-pronounced words....

makes me larf hearing a Yank say vehicles
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Grafter
Posts: 519
Registered: ‎30-07-2007

Re: How about Mis-pronounced words....

Another one is mischievous.
How often have you heard mischeevious ?
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Grafter
Posts: 2,540
Registered: ‎12-09-2008

Re: How about Mis-pronounced words....

And what about the Bill where there seem to be a lot of burgalries
Correct me if I'm wrong but thought it was burglaries?
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Grafter
Posts: 2,933
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Registered: ‎30-07-2007

Re: How about Mis-pronounced words....

Quote from: techguy
When reading that Josie I imagined that you may have a Brummie accent

No - I hail from 7 miles outside Manchester and have accent for that area BUT my Mum was from Wednesbury, West Midlands.  There it "powers wuth roin"....................................
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Grafter
Posts: 19,757
Registered: ‎30-07-2007

Re: How about Mis-pronounced words....

how about these northern place names
# Allesley, Coventry - /ˈɔːlzli/; (ôlzʹlē)
# Alnwick, Northumberland — /ˈænɪk/; (ăʹnĭk)
# Altrincham, Greater Manchester — /ˈɒltrɪŋəm/; (ŏlʹtrĭngʹəm)
# Barugh, South Yorkshire — /bɑːk/; (bäk)
# Great Barugh and Little Barugh, North Yorkshire — /bɑrf/; (bärf)
Bellingham, Northumberland — /'bɛlɪndʒəm/; (bĕlʹən-jəm) · (the city of Bellingham, Washington, U.S.A., is pronounced as spelled [/ˈbɛlɪŋhæm/, bĕʹlĭng-hămʹ])
Berwick-upon-Tweed, Northumberland — /ˈbɛrɪk-/; (bĕʹrĭk)
or from Silly Suffolk  try http://www.suffolkchurches.co.uk/pronunciation.htm
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Grafter
Posts: 2,933
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Registered: ‎30-07-2007

Re: How about Mis-pronounced words....

Quote from: pierre_pierre
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# Altrincham, Greater Manchester — /ˈɒltrɪŋəm/; (ŏlʹtrĭngʹəm)

I used to live not far from Altringam - as many folk round there would  say it [and spell it too!]
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Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 23,501
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Registered: ‎11-01-2008

Re: How about Mis-pronounced words....

Quote from: pierre_pierre
how about these northern place names
# Allesley, Coventry - /ˈɔːlzli/; (ôlzʹlē)

That seems a bit of an odd way to say a silent 'e', i.e it's said Allsley.
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Grafter
Posts: 241
Registered: ‎06-04-2008

Re: How about Mis-pronounced words....

A phrase that bugs me is "off of" as in "I got off of the bus" - or as Andy Williams sings "Can't take my eye off of yew-oo"".  Huh

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Community Veteran
Posts: 1,699
Registered: ‎30-07-2007

Re: How about Mis-pronounced words....

I know there have been other similar threads to this one in the past, and I still can't see why people from England insist on putting the letter r where it doesn't belong, and then leave it out, where it does!
The futhe I get along with the drawring, the mo I remembu what the teachu tort us. (although what a hard shelled reptilian has to do with draw(r)ing, I don't know)  Roll_eyes
John
And by the way collective nouns are definitely singular.  There is only one government - the government is destroying the country.  There is only one Plusnet, Plusnet is having a new boss.
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Community Veteran
Posts: 6,111
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Registered: ‎05-04-2007

Re: How about Mis-pronounced words....

I'm afraid I must respectfully disagree John. Have a look at this page, which references a publication from the OUP.
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Hero
Posts: 4,190
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Registered: ‎30-07-2008

Re: How about Mis-pronounced words....

Even though I'm now familiar with the name, it still catches me out when I hear a Radio 4 continuity announcer trail a programme featuring one 'Cleb Awlding' - aka Clare Balding.
Bee Alert >> Spray safe >> Save hives
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Community Veteran
Posts: 1,699
Registered: ‎30-07-2007

Re: How about Mis-pronounced words....

Hi Be3G
I realise that in recent years this bad practice has become the norm.  But the question you have to ask is, how many governments are being referred to?  If it's just one, then it must be singular.  If you mean that members of the government are doing something, then it would be correct to say that "government ministers are ...".  Would you really say  "Gordon Brown's government are meeting today to discuss how they can rip tax payers off for even more of their savings"?  "Government are ..." even sounds wrong.
John
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Community Veteran
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Re: How about Mis-pronounced words....

No, I'd treat 'government' as singular. But that's the point: some collective nouns lend themselves to being treated as singulars, whilst others lend themselves to being treated as plurals. As the earlier-linked article points out, the deciding factor can often be whether the subject is personal or impersonal, so a government would be treated as singular because you don't really think of the individual members, whereas you'd treat a family as plural. As far I'm aware this is a trait of the English language, not just a recent bad practice; the article I mentioned earlier plus also this page from Oxford Dictionaries would appear to support that belief. American English, on the other hand, does as you suggest and treats everything as singular.
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Grafter
Posts: 2,540
Registered: ‎12-09-2008

Re: How about Mis-pronounced words....

Another thing that annoys me is people trying to imitate what they think their favourite rap 'star' talks like.
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Community Veteran
Posts: 1,699
Registered: ‎30-07-2007

Re: How about Mis-pronounced words....

Much as I hate to agree with Americans. I'm afraid this is a case, where they have maintained the usage, while the UK has moved away from it.  I'm forced to accept the use of plurals in collective nouns, but as my English teacher used to say, "at least be consistent!"  Either they're plural or singular, they can't be both.  That just derives from sloppy thinking.
I have similar issues at work, where I have colleagues who insist on saying "On entering the premise ...", or "The premise was closed"  When I suggest that they mean "premises"  Their answer is, "There was only one" Huh
John