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Great news for PlusNet

Community Veteran
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Registered: 21-03-2011

Great news for PlusNet

Ofcom are considering splitting its troublesome main supplier away from BT (details in many places but here's one). If that happens PN executives will no longer be constrained by the need to respect internal company politics to safe guard their careers.
Now Zen, but a +Net residue.
4 REPLIES
Community Veteran
Posts: 3,274
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Registered: 24-10-2013

Re: Great news for PlusNet

i doubt any split would make one bit of a difference to be honest.
the problems at openreach would simply move to the new openreach company. run by the same people as it is just now.
plusnet would just be a small annoyance with next to no clout to any new openreach company.
Community Veteran
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Registered: 06-11-2007

Re: Great news for PlusNet

Has PlusNet got any clout with BTOR at present?  ?  ?  ? 
Community Veteran
Posts: 3,274
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Registered: 24-10-2013

Re: Great news for PlusNet

nope they don't.
but that wouldn't increase with openreach being a separate entity.
nanotm
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Re: Great news for PlusNet

any split to create independence would last a matter of weeks before it was gobbled up by a competitor like sky which has much deeper pockets than most of the other Telco's
BT as a group has been stalling on supplying true investment in the infrastructure side of things for many years whilst they fund other ventures (like iptv, freeview, overseas infrastructure provision etc) BT global services has provided a lot of innovation and most of the things they learn by experimenting how and what they do overseas are then replicated here, the problem is the monster time delay between those efforts, BTGS was a big part of buying laying and running several of the undersea communications cables (the recent ventiure in Africa is the fasted highest comms cable ever produced, yet they seem unable to upgrade the cabels they laid between the uk and the us or even the one to Holland both of which are so ancient they are the slowest intercontinental links in the world (the dedicated business link might be one of the fastest but it doesn't carry consumer traffic which all goes through the BTWDC interconnect in boston new York)
changing the way BT operates would be far better than splitting the company up, they shed jobs and contract the maint work out to substandard contractors (ok some of them are good at the job but most of the ones I've dealt with are barely even useful) and rather than having a proactive upgrade process they leave the same network switches and routers in place for decades at a time only replacing them when they break, it took them 12 years to run a 50 mile bakhaul upgrade changing one exchange from a 50 meg link to a 50,000,000meg link (they added a bundle of 12 fibre cables) this cost money (lots of it) in far higher running costs and lack of customers, luckily for the area in question virgin scooped up much of the slack, but not all of it,  the only reason BT actually laid the upgrade was the theft of 2 miles of copper cable necessitated its replacement and it was cheaper to replace the entire 50 mile stretch......
the old network switch gear costs 100's of thousands of pounds more every year to run than the newer stuff does, replacing it would allow for full ipv6 compatibility (reducing the need for novel ways to extend the lifespan of ipv4) it would apparently take less than 12 months to effect such a massive rollout plan which would see the bandwidth available through all that equipment increase 10 fold (much of the old stuff being slow and energy hungry)  allowing for a large upgrade in end user bandwidth, transferring homes onto fibre (regardless of what product package they choose to pay for) and ceasing the old adsl system would save 200 million a year in running costs for BTOR and streamline all equipment into one type, performing the task was predicted to have physical costs of 500 million (buying new gear and hiring the necessary machines) back in 2004 but was delayed in implementation because BTGS were tasked to create Deep Packet Inspection (the backhaul spy package) work that was created in 2006 (at a cost of 12 billion pounds) then parliamentary approval  was required and finally work started on an ambitious rollout plan in 2008 with funds being made available for across BT group to fund the work of open reach.
should BT be split into multiple companies it will all become part of sky or talk talk within 5 years as each part hasn't got the ability to fund its endeavours on its own and no one part has enough clout to be able to sell investment bonds and so it would collapse and far from a monopolistic supplier that has already outlined how once the upgrade work is completed in 2023 (everyone on fibre) its running costs of the network would reduce by half its current cost and similarly its charges would go down, we would have a double pay internet service just like the yanks do having to pay through the nose for internet that doesn't get any better then pay again to get a useable priority on their traffic and then pay again for the content (which they pay twice for as the content provider also pays for its traffic to get to the customer), BT might not be perfect and prone to moving slower than cold treacle but there are a lot of good points to them and any dismantling of the company will be hugely problematic, what we really need is the regulator to focus bt's efforts away from new ventures (like the announced 15 billion investment in pay tv or the 5 billion in mobile services) and instead direct them to get on with the internet stuff including rollouts to all those minority areas with one or two houses, of course they are hampered in that effort frequently by legal opposition to the planning consent they are forced to apply for in every location and every road they need to disrupt ....... often being taken to court to stop them laying the cables required to provision the service (especially in rural areas .....)
just because your paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get you