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Graduated drivers licence.

Minivanman
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Graduated drivers licence.

Seems that consideration is now being given to introducing a graduated driving licence system for young drivers which on the face of it seems like a good idea, but as an elderly driver m'self maybe the reverse should also be introduced.

Keeping kids off the roads at night, off the motorways, and passenger restrictions might well be applied at the other end of the scale in all fairness. I look back in horror at what we were allowed to do after passing that driving test - on my first drive home from the test centre in an Austin A30 I felt like Donald Campbell and Stirling Moss rolled into one.

What an idiot.

Self imposed but I no longer drive at night, avoid motorways like the plague and rarely if ever carry passengers - especially my grandchildren. From what I've seen it's not just the youngsters that need a graduated licence, some of us older drivers should be obliged to have them as well controversial as that sounds.

Now where did I leave my driving gloves and flat hat. :wink:

 

85 REPLIES 85
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Re: Graduated drivers licence.

@Minivanman 

Bit puzzled by your last bit about not driving at night ?

If it's to do with your sight the conditions of your licence state the requirements needed for driving in all conditions.

When you reapply for your licence every 3 years you fill in a very detailed form about your state of health, based on that the dvla decide to reissue with a licence or require you to undergo some form of test.

In my case I have glaucoma and the dvla required me to undergo a sight test which showed my sight was up to the required standard, I will have to undergo that again in 3 years and if I fail my licence will not be renewed.

In short I would argue those over 70 are already subject to a test.

I drive at night and frequently on the motorway.

Champnet
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Re: Graduated drivers licence.

As a young systems engineer I was averaging 2k miles a week, no bother, enjoyed the challenge.

Now retired I continually check the weather and road conditions before venturing out, or not.

What worries me these days are the number of high performance cars being driven by very young looking and possibly inexperienced drivers....

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Re: Graduated drivers licence.

I'd had thought of this idea myself many many years ago, as it make way more sense to me. Not only should it include the above but also include performance. The older and wiser you are then the more horses you are entitled to have under your bonnet and as you age then the reverse should be true too.

 

Crunchie
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Re: Graduated drivers licence.

I think the issue is that people age in different and very individual ways.  Also, some people are great at recognizing their own limits and imposing those limits upon themselves and other people aren't so good.

 

While imposing re-tests on pensioners might be notionally a good idea, the cost of doing this would be high - certainly more expensive than the TV license.

Pete
Champnet
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Re: Graduated drivers licence.


@Mook wrote:

The older and wiser you are then the more horses you are entitled to have under your bonnet and as you age then the reverse should be true too.

Age related BHP, tough one to enforce.......


 

Community Veteran
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Re: Graduated drivers licence.

I don't like driving at night simply because I don't trust any other road users.

I can't see far enough ahead to see a car driver about to do something stupid. It's harder to see the weaving cyclist with no lights. Or the pedestrians crossing the road only seen by the light of their mobiles.

During the day it's easy to spot all the idiots. At night you have to trust peoples common sense and I don't.

 

Community Veteran
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Re: Graduated drivers licence.

Agreed it's not the easiest, but it could in theory be enforced using insurance when the individual calls in to insure the BHP 'privileges' of the license is checked against the BHP of the car that is no doubt available to the insurer.

Another option although a bit 'big brother' is that all vehicles are fitted with a 'card reader',  where the driver inserts their license into it before the car will start and if it's remove it stops. If the license restricts the BHP of the car then the ECU can wind down the available power.

 

Luzern
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Re: Graduated drivers licence.

I recall my young days learning. I drove at night with dad in a really old car, 1934 Morris Minor, through fog from Kent into Essex. I wanted dad to take over, but no I had to learn it may as well be then. On I went with open windscreen.

At eighty-two and a big lump, with cataracts removed, I know that I could drive at night, but also that my reactions could be slower even to changes in light levels.

Even closer to the present; yesterday we made a day drip to visit one of mine and family, who live near Bristol, by train. We were met in Salisbury abot 18 miles from home, no buses at that time of night, by our grandson, who passed at the start of this month.:shocked: We felt reasonably comfortable. And he was driving my car

Like my dad, my daughter and husband took him for practice at all times, so maybe the emphasis in the learning process should be getting early experience of as many conditions. I don't think that the family's love of cycling, skiing and canoeing can have harmed their awareness either. Perhaps they are an exception, but even so, I think the government needs to hold back from nannying.

Anyone know what other countries do?

No one has to agree with my opinion, but in the time I have left a miracle would be nice.
8BKA
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Re: Graduated drivers licence.

Graduated licensing schemes already operate in several parts of the world, including New York and California in the US, Ontario and British Columbia in Canada, New South Wales and Victoria in Australia, and across Sweden.

It's not young drivers it's anyone who has just past their test so it's any age

 

Brian A

Minesapint
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Re: Graduated drivers licence.

The graduated licence thing seems to work for bikes.

Should be the same for cars IMO. Similar age limits as well.

There seem to be a lot of badly driven, big fast cars about, a lot by teenagers.

Older drivers should have to complete an assessment every few years after 70.

I'm 65 this year.

Minivanman
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Re: Graduated drivers licence.

Divided opinions then, but it just seemed to be that if there was going to one requirement for the youngsters there should be one for the older folks neither of who are going to like having it imposed.

The kids think they are the greatest and the oldies know they have years of experience. I just try and be fair to my age (I'm 72) and accept my eyes are not as good or my reactions quite as sharp. As for passengers, if I'm going to pop my clogs whilst driving (and yes I know it can happen at any age) then I'd rather it was just myself behind the wheel and nobody else.

Horses for courses as they say or in this case, horses under the bonnet. :smiley:

Champnet
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Re: Graduated drivers licence.

I do believe the ‘P’ plate should be compulsory for the first 12 months. If I see one, likewise the ‘L’ plate, I accept there is an inexperienced driver and expect the unexpected.

idonno
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Re: Graduated drivers licence.


@Minivanman wrote: I look back in horror at what we were allowed to do after passing that driving test - on my first drive home from the test centre in an Austin A30 I felt like Donald Campbell and Stirling Moss rolled into one.

I took my test in a driving school car and on hearing that I'd passed my test, the first words from the driving instructor was could I move over into the passenger seat. :crazy3: I found out later that was standard fare among the driving schools, as there were more accidents immediately after a passed test than they had during instruction.

 

It's all right coming up with these new ideas (and yes, some are wanted) but you need enforcement and with limited numbers on the ground I can't see that happening much.

 

I have to agree with @re: driving at night and on motorways. I think once you start to restrict yourself, that is acknowledgement that things are no longer 100%. And let's face it, with the roads like they are, you need to be 100%. I can still remember my ex partner's mother (in her 70's) struggling to get her car into our parking space. I suggested that maybe time to hang up the keys and I was absolutely flabbergasted when she replied, "You know what, you're right". She got shot of the car not long afterwards.

 

And many a time, I've followed somebody on a main road at night, going along much slower than normal. Braking every time something comes the other way, sat on the white line etc, it becomes rather obvious they cannot see where they are going. Unfortunately when did you last see a traffic patrol car. Not very often round these parts.

Ever helpful. :grin: Sure, I’d love to help you out. Now which way did you come in?
Jonpe
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Re: Graduated drivers licence.

I'm sure there is a tendency among young men to show off to their friends who haven't passed their test yet.  I don't know how many are killed or seriously injured as a result of travelling in a car driven by a new driver, but there are occasional reports of accidents involving a car full of teenagers where no-one survived.  One can only imagine what their families must be going through.

When I learnt to drive, my instructor reminded me on numerous occasions that passing the driving test only means that you have met the minimum standard.  I know several people who've taken the advanced driving course and found it good value for money.