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Gardening question

Community Veteran
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Registered: 24-09-2008

Gardening question

Am I missing a trick here?
With blackcurrants, does anybody know / can somebody suggest a quick method of separating the little green stalks from the berry. For years I've been washing in warm water then sorting thru the berries a group at the time and handpicking the stalks off.
10 REPLIES
pwatson
Rising Star
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Registered: 26-11-2012

Re: Gardening question

A tip from Waitrose
[quote=http://www.waitrose.com/content/waitrose/en/home/recipes/food_glossary/blackcurrants.html]To prepare: To remove the berries from the stalks, hold each stalk at the top with the berries at the bottom and run a fork down each one. The berries should come away easily, without being damaged.
No idea if it works Smiley
Community Veteran
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Re: Gardening question

SWMBO does it with a fork.  Cool
nanotm
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Re: Gardening question

yeah we used to pull them off the bush with the fork method, much easier than pulling stalks out, just make sure you have a larger old fork and don't rush it down the stem  Wink
just because your paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get you
Community Veteran
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Re: Gardening question

At least you can harvest them, I have to fight them like triffids in our garden, damned things are worse than the borg, assimilating all available space they can get into, and thought resistance is not futile, it's just really painful cos they're covered in evil thorns.... Shocked
Community Veteran
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Registered: 15-06-2007

Re: Gardening question

Blackcurrants don't have thorns - now blackberries or brambles that is a different kettle of fish
Community Veteran
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Re: Gardening question

Quote from: Oldjim
Blackcurrants don't have thorns

Damn, got caught out by the beer goggles again....... Grin
Community Veteran
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Re: Gardening question

The hard slow way seems the easiest for me.
Just quickly clipping off the bunches then sitting watching the telly as I mindlessly separate the berries.
Community Veteran
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Registered: 02-08-2007

Re: Gardening question

@billnotben,
I assume you use them to make jam ?
so to take your question a bit further how do you get rid of the other hard bit on each currant ? with jam no problem as they rise to the surface when heated in a pan of water which you later add sugar too but what if you were using them in a pie ?
Community Veteran
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Re: Gardening question

We have some blackbirds in the garden who are ace at parting currants from the bush. Fortunately this year we remembered to buy and deploy some netting.
Now Zen, but a +Net residue.
Community Veteran
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Registered: 24-09-2008

Re: Gardening question

Blackbirds seem to leave the black currants alone but are ace at getting under the strawberry netting, then squawk until I come along and release them.
Our red currant bushes are stripped bare, Blackbirds are having a good go at the gooseberry bushes this year which is unusual, they are normally left.
Had a pair of Bullfinches pick the buds out of some of our apple trees.
Problems this year is a family of water/bank voles getting at the strawberry plants and rabbits at the brassicas.
@Gleneagles "the had bit at the end of the currant", assume you mean what is left of "the flower".
We don't make jam, some b/c are frozen whole, others are boiled with a little water, then strained, the liquid goes to make both Cassis and b/c cordial, the 'sludge left over' is frozen and used as pie filling or cereal topping.