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Friday Surgery

nadger
Rising Star
Posts: 4,498
Thanks: 46
Registered: 13-04-2007

Friday Surgery

We've all heard of Friday cars but now we seem to have Friday surgery
Worrying thought
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-22687599
15 REPLIES
itsme
Grafter
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Registered: 07-04-2007

Re: Friday Surgery

It's so doctors can now take Fridays off and say it's to the benefit of patients.
Community Veteran
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Registered: 12-08-2007

Re: Friday Surgery

Of course it's nothing to do with doctors having Fridays off.  If you read the article that nadger posted his link to it is thought to be down to support staff not being as great at weekends following surgery.  The NHS is addressing this situation by looking at staffing levels.
itsme
Grafter
Posts: 5,924
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Registered: 07-04-2007

Re: Friday Surgery

Should have put a tongue in cheek smiley Tongue

Community Veteran
Posts: 18,544
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Registered: 12-08-2007

Re: Friday Surgery

OK now I understand.
When I had my first prostate op the surgeon asked if I wanted it done on a Friday night or a Saturday morning. I opted for the Saturday morning and made him laugh when I suggested he might do a better job after a good night's sleep.
shalom2010
Grafter
Posts: 972
Registered: 28-12-2012

Re: Friday Surgery

I've never heard of 'Friday cars' - what's that about?
When I was in hospital the weekends were like ghost towns. Just the round of doctors to say 'how are you' - whom I'd never seen before, or again Smiley
Community Veteran
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Registered: 01-08-2007

Re: Friday Surgery

Well I guess the surgeon who operated on me on Thursday (and severely bodged it) must have had his days muddled up then  Undecided
I need a new signature... i'm bored of the old one!
Community Veteran
Posts: 18,544
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Registered: 12-08-2007

Re: Friday Surgery

The report deals with elective surgery Roll eyes
Community Veteran
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Registered: 01-08-2007

Re: Friday Surgery

elective surgery being?
(sorry for any confusion with the multiple edits - accidentally modified this instead of hitting reply and then got in a muddle - post now restored)
I need a new signature... i'm bored of the old one!
Community Veteran
Posts: 18,544
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Registered: 12-08-2007

Re: Friday Surgery

Elective surgery is when you attend hospital by appointment for an operation as opposed to emergency surgery which is carried out without prior arrangement.whenever needed.
A patient rushed to A&E and is operated on is an emergency.  A patient going into hospital by appointment for say, a new hip, is elective.
Community Veteran
Posts: 13,920
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Registered: 01-08-2007

Re: Friday Surgery

Ah so my Thursday operation which was the first one where things went wrong, was elective surgery then as it was pre-arranged about six weeks before (and thus I stick with my original comment lol). The emergency one (which was the second one) was on the following Sunday where they repaired the damage the first surgeon did.
He must have been thinking it was a friday lol
I need a new signature... i'm bored of the old one!
Community Veteran
Posts: 13,920
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Registered: 01-08-2007

Re: Friday Surgery

I really can't get my replies, quotes and modifications right today.... Duplicate of the last post.
I need a new signature... i'm bored of the old one!
alanf
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Registered: 17-10-2007

Re: Friday Surgery

I haven't read the report. I would like to find something close to the original research rather than a newspaper report. Lies, damn lies and statistics and all that.
I did hear about the story on the Sky newspaper review last night.
My first thought was that perhaps routine operations are performed on weekdays so any performed at weekends are on more urgent cases and thus the patients had more serious problems and were therefore at greater risk. Elective surgery is by definition non-urgent so that does not seem to be the answer.
According to the reviewers Mondays were safer than Tuesdays, Tuesdays safer than Wednesdays and so on. So the answer MAY be because if operated on Monday you have 4 days for problems to develop and take advantage of weekday after care. The later in the week the operation occurs the more likely that any problems will arise over the weekend when lower quality care is available. Or perhaps staff become more exhausted as the week progresses?
alanf
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Registered: 17-10-2007

Re: Friday Surgery

NHS's summary and response
http://www.nhs.uk/news/2013/05May/Pages/End-of-week-surgery-has-higher-death-risk.aspx
As ever the Daily Mail headline writer got it wrong “82% more chance of dying in surgery at weekend” instead of “82% more chance of dying following surgery at weekend” . (Deaths were counted if occurring within 30 days after surgery. It was not a tally of deaths on the operating table at weekends).
The NHS article says 'However, studies in other countries have found no such effect, suggesting that the “weekend effect” may only occur in certain national healthcare systems and is not universal.'
The original report did refer to similar findings in studies in the USA and Australia. So perhaps that sentence should have been " 'However, studies in " (some/ many/ most?) " other countries have found no such effect, ...". because whilst "not universal" studies in (some) other countries have found the effect.
Full report from BMJ.
http://www.bmj.com/content/346/bmj.f2424
I don't like the definition of "low risk" of death following elective surgery. If overall death rates within 30 days are c 0.7% and that presumably includes many minor procedures then the risk of death from non-trivial procedures in my view are far from "low".
nadger
Rising Star
Posts: 4,498
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Registered: 13-04-2007

Re: Friday Surgery

When I had radical cystectomy and ileal conduit op, for bladder cancer, the consultant surgeon only performed that procedure on a Friday morning. After the 5 to 6 hours op one went straight to ITU for at least one night.
First cancer op ( TURBT) was performed on a Thursday.
Very long EVAR op was performed on a  Thursday - went to theatre between 3 and 4 pm and came back after midnight.
All these ops were performed during period of report ( 2008 to 2011) so I'm on the right side of the stats Smiley