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Forward planning...

Community Veteran
Posts: 7,149
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Registered: 30-08-2007

Forward planning...

Living near the top of a quite steep hill, winter snow presents quite a problem especially as the road is not high priority for gritting.
I have given some thought to fitting "cold weather" tyres (to give them their correct name) for the worst of the winter months. To this end I have located a set of second-hand wheels that are from a car of a similar age and model.
But I have a couple of questions:
My standard wheels are alloy, the second-hand set are steel, any problems?
Do I need different wheel nuts for steel wheels?
Can I fit the cold-weather tyres to just to the drive wheels (front in my case) or must I change the whole set?
Experience; is something you gain, just after you needed it most.

When faced with two choices, simply toss a coin. It works not because it settles the question for you. But because in that brief moment while the coin is in the air. You suddenly know what you are hoping for.
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Community Veteran
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Re: Forward planning...

Quote from: Petlew
My standard wheels are alloy, the second-hand set are steel, any problems?
Do I need different wheel nuts for steel wheels?
Can I fit the cold-weather tyres to just to the drive wheels (front in my case) or must I change the whole set?

I have winter tyres (separate sets of wheels) for both my cars.
Check with your manufacturer re wheel nuts, certainly not all fit both types of wheel.
Steel wheels for winter is fine (though mine are actually cheap alloys of a smaller size with deeper tyres); the spare for your alloy wheels is probably steel.
ALWAYS fit a full set.
Oh, and don't forget the spare, if you have one.
(I bought a cheap part-worn winter tyre as a spare for both mine)
Community Veteran
Posts: 7,149
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Registered: 30-08-2007

Re: Forward planning...

Many thanks HPsauce. Since you have the experience, do they actually work?
I understand that cold-weather tyres look and feel when driving no different to standard tyres, but is the rubber compound that is different.
Experience; is something you gain, just after you needed it most.

When faced with two choices, simply toss a coin. It works not because it settles the question for you. But because in that brief moment while the coin is in the air. You suddenly know what you are hoping for.
Community Veteran
Posts: 7,149
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Registered: 30-08-2007

Re: Forward planning...

PS. do you laboriously change all your wheels yourself. Or get a local tyre bay to do than in a couple of minutes?
If the latter, how much are you charged?
Experience; is something you gain, just after you needed it most.

When faced with two choices, simply toss a coin. It works not because it settles the question for you. But because in that brief moment while the coin is in the air. You suddenly know what you are hoping for.
Community Veteran
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Registered: 02-02-2008

Re: Forward planning...

They work, absolutely no doubt on that. Tend to have mine on for 4 or 5 months of the year.
They work fine even if the ambient temperature is above the "crossover" point of 7C and most of my journeys are early morning or evening when it's cooler.
I buy tyres online these days and use a mobile fitter (man in a van). He charges about £10 per wheel for fitting, balancing and disposal.
The "swapping" tends to get done alongside a "proper job" on one of the cars and he just charges a nominal sum for his time to do it.
If you've got the right tools and know what you're doing it doesn't take long to swap 2 sets of wheels over.  Wink
(I keep the unused sets at home so its easier all round, though many tyre places will store them for you, either as complete wheels or just tyres for swapping)
Community Veteran
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Re: Forward planning...

If DIY ..... make sure you check for the "rotation" arrow
Community Veteran
Posts: 7,149
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Registered: 30-08-2007

Re: Forward planning...

Thanks again guys..
I had a new set of tyres fitted about 10k miles ago. These (Dunlop's) are the first set I've had that are "handed" for side and rotation direction. Seem to be good tyres too.
Experience; is something you gain, just after you needed it most.

When faced with two choices, simply toss a coin. It works not because it settles the question for you. But because in that brief moment while the coin is in the air. You suddenly know what you are hoping for.
Community Veteran
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Re: Forward planning...

Does this mean you need to have two spare tyres in the boot now?  one for each side ? ? ? 
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Re: Forward planning...

No, just the four (left, right, summer, winter)!  Grin Grin
As long as you're only going to use one as a spare (until a 'proper' tyre is repaired or replaced) then I'd just have a single spare - non-directional general purpose (cheap), as mentioned above a 'part-worn' is fine as long as it's basically 'sound'.
Call me 'w23'
At any given moment in the universe many things happen. Coincidence is a matter of how close these events are in space, time and relationship.
Opinions expressed in forum posts are those of the poster, others may have different views.
Community Veteran
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Re: Forward planning...

Surely, having a "cheapo" spare, as indicated, negates the point of having the expensive set in the first place, if you have a puncture or damaged tyre, and it is winter time and the snow and ice are why you bought the expensive set.... Also, putting on a "non matching" tyre will affect the handling/braking/stopping distances............. won`t it?
[Moderator's note by Adie (dvorak):  Full quote of preceding post removed, as per Forum Rules ] tut
Community Veteran
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Re: Forward planning...

I would certainly agree to some extent shutter but tyres 'age' and, touch wood, it's many years since I had a puncture so a full-price spare might outlast several sets of tyres and possibly become unusable even before being used.  A cheap general purpose tyre should get you to a tyre repair centre in all but the very worst of conditions safely (and is definitely preferable to the 'space-saver' things supplied with so many modern vehicles). 
Call me 'w23'
At any given moment in the universe many things happen. Coincidence is a matter of how close these events are in space, time and relationship.
Opinions expressed in forum posts are those of the poster, others may have different views.
Community Veteran
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Re: Forward planning...

Quote from: walker23
(and is definitely preferable to the 'space-saver' things supplied with so many modern vehicles). 

Yeah..... I have often wondered about the safety aspects of driving with one of those on the front ..... would probably be ok at 30 mph but I would not risk it any higher, despite the mfctrs words of wisdom...
itsme
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Re: Forward planning...

Quote from: Petlew
Many thanks HPsauce. Since you have the experience, do they actually work?

I'm a skier and drive hire cars fitted with winter tyres when I go skiing. I'm always amazed how good winter tyres are, and I been up some steep ice covered mountain passes with no problems.