cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Floppy Disks

Midnight_Caller
Rising Star
Posts: 4,143
Thanks: 7
Fixes: 1
Registered: 15-04-2007

Floppy Disks

Hi All
Do you remember Floppy Disks 3.5? or 5.25 Floppy Disks?
I remember Floppy Disks I think I still have over 450 of them, some for PC's some for Apple Macintosh's, and last but not least Commodore Business Machines Amiga 500
I still have some Floppy Disks 5.25 for Commodore Business Machines Computers as well.  
35 REPLIES
Community Veteran
Posts: 6,735
Thanks: 12
Registered: 02-02-2008

Re: Floppy Disks

Don't remember 5.5" floppies, but I do have some 5.25" ones, and a drive to read/write them!
I also remember working with 8" ones!
thejudge
Grafter
Posts: 571
Thanks: 1
Registered: 01-08-2007

Re: Floppy Disks

I still use them occasionally. They're very useful for backing up small files or groups of files (configs, that sort of thing).
Community Veteran
Posts: 14,469
Registered: 30-07-2007

Re: Floppy Disks

Well, volunteering at The National Museum Of Computing, we can't do much without them Smiley
No such thing as a 5.5" disk, they are 5.25" disks.
There were 3" disks and various capacities of 3.5" disks. One I'm using at the moment can hold 21Mbs (it's called a floptical), looks identical to a 3.5" floppy disk but uses a laser for track alignment. But it never caught on as the 100MB Zip drives arrived a few months later. I'm actually using a 21Mbs flopical drive at the moment to copy some old disks.
Then there were 8" disks... single sided, double sided, single density, double density, hard sectored, soft sectored.... yada yada yada and all incompatible with each other.
Also did you know that one of the first hard disk drives had a 4 foot diameter platter, was arranged in a reinforced cabinet 5 foot hiigh along with 15 other 4 foot platters, had hydraulically  powered read/write heads and spun at 2400 RPM. You didn't want to be anywhere within a 100 yards when that had a head crash!
When I was a lad we used to use 5 hole and 8 hole paper tape.... before that came punched cards (both 80 column and 40 column) and before that.... I'll stop now  Cheesy


pierre_pierre
Grafter
Posts: 19,757
Registered: 30-07-2007

Re: Floppy Disks

still got some 3.5 but nothing to read them on, also got two different Iomega drives and disks the bigges I think was 100M, much easier with a small plug in 8G stick
Community Veteran
Posts: 6,735
Thanks: 12
Registered: 02-02-2008

Re: Floppy Disks

Hard drives, pffft. Did you ever work with FastRand? They were scary beasts, and VERY noisy.
I also remember something that I think was called a CRAM which held masses of punched cards vertically that were released and guided through ducts by air. No doubt someone can give a more accurate description.
And finally, the mercury delay line in a Leo I (or was it Leo II?)
Found CRAM: http://archive.computerhistory.org/resources/text/NCR/NCR.CRAM.1960.102646240.pdf
Data was magnetic, I think the punchings were the coded release mechanism.
And here's Fastrand: http://www.fourmilab.ch/documents/univac/fastrand.html
"one of the most impressive peripherals ever attached to a commercial computer"
Community Veteran
Posts: 14,469
Registered: 30-07-2007

Re: Floppy Disks

Not forgetting the Willams Tube
Card Random Access Memory - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NCR_CRAM
But we are getting away from off-line storage.
pierre_pierre
Grafter
Posts: 19,757
Registered: 30-07-2007

Re: Floppy Disks

the wooden box with a flip down lid to hold the phone onto the speaker and mic for contacting base 30 milesaway
Midnight_Caller
Rising Star
Posts: 4,143
Thanks: 7
Fixes: 1
Registered: 15-04-2007

Re: Floppy Disks

Quote from: Peter
No such thing as a 5.5" disk, they are 5.25" disks.

I thought that I was rong with 5.5   Embarrassed  and I still have some 5.25 Floppy Disks
Quote
When I was a lad we used to use 5 hole and 8 hole paper tape.

Wen I was at Commodore Business Machines thay used 5 hole paper tape I think.
Commodore Business Machines have them spool to spool tapes 8 track I think, they were heavy for the mainframe.
Community Veteran
Posts: 6,735
Thanks: 12
Registered: 02-02-2008

Re: Floppy Disks

IBM 360 by the look of it, not sure which model exactly.
Midnight_Caller
Rising Star
Posts: 4,143
Thanks: 7
Fixes: 1
Registered: 15-04-2007

Re: Floppy Disks

This is more like the Mainframe that CBM had, and yes this is a IBM-370 Mainframe
wisty
Aspiring Pro
Posts: 434
Thanks: 53
Fixes: 3
Registered: 30-07-2007

Re: Floppy Disks

Floppy Drums!!
I worked (1966?) on a KDF7 with drum memory utilizing a three phase motor. The heads "flew" on the boundary layer swept round by the rotating drum. One weekend the electricians were in and we had to power everything down. First thing Monday I powered it all up. The sparks had swapped two of the phases - so the drum rotated the wrong way. Instead of flying the heads were sucked onto the drum and machined off the magnetic coating. I seem to remember that it cost about 100 times my yearly wage to replace it!!!  
Community Veteran
Posts: 14,469
Registered: 30-07-2007

Re: Floppy Disks

IBM 360 Model 40 according to this: http://www.quadibloc.com/comp/pan04.htm
and MC, if it's a 370 why does it say 360 on the IBM label at the top.
Midnight_Caller
Rising Star
Posts: 4,143
Thanks: 7
Fixes: 1
Registered: 15-04-2007

Re: Floppy Disks

@Peter Vaughan, I am going from the info on here that it is a IBM Mainframe 370.
Community Veteran
Posts: 14,469
Registered: 30-07-2007

Re: Floppy Disks

Quote from: HPsauce
And finally, the mercury delay line in a Leo I (or was it Leo II?)

First introduced on EDSAC (1949). This evolved into LEO I (1954) which was in effect the commercial version of EDSAC.