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Flooded Car (not mine)

Strat
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Flooded Car (not mine)

We had some flooding to certain roads around Sheffield yesterday.

A 2 year old car that was rescued from a flood and taken to a garage was declared by the mechanic as a write-off.

It had driven through foot deep water and the floor inside was soaked.

It appeared to be written off because of water in the engine.

I would have thought that taking the head and sump off and giving the engine a good clean would enable it to be rebuilt and run.

Interested to hear from more knowledgeable folk.

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7 REPLIES 7
nozzer
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Re: Flooded Car (not mine)

What usually happens when a car injests water is that one or more cylinders hydraulic lock. That very often results in the cylinder head and/or the engine block getting cracked, therefore jiggered. Water is incompressible almost, so a rotating engine that takes in water tries to compress it and bingo.

It has to be rotating at the time though. You're right about a wet engine being retrievable if hydraulic locking hasn't occurred.

PowerLee
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Re: Flooded Car (not mine)

The wiring loom & the multiple ecu's inside the car will get damaged by the water to.

 

Corrosion inside a wiring loom & ecu's can take a long while to show up, for example no insurance company would want the possible come back of an airbag ecu failing to do its job in the event of the car they put back on the road being involved in a future accident.

gleneagles
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Re: Flooded Car (not mine)

Interesting replies.

Reconditioned engine worth considering ?

Going slightly off topic I guess the owner will take a hit on what the insurance company is prepared to pay out.

Wonder what the position is if it's a leased car, does the still take a loss ?

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Strat
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Re: Flooded Car (not mine)

Good point about insurance.

My car was parked in an area not known for flooding and an abnormally heavy, prolonged downpour caused a flood, maybe due to drains being incapable of handling the excess water.

versus

I drove my car into a flooded part of the road and had to get out and leave it there as the engine would not restart.

 

Which version would an insurance company look favourably on.

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nozzer
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Re: Flooded Car (not mine)

@gleneagles

 

Most insurance policies now have new-for-old cover, so if you write off a leased car it should be replaced like for like. This can last up to twelve months, depending on the policy issuer. Beyond that you might need Gap insurance, which will guarantee to pay for the vehicle if it's written off, so you then have the remaining lease installments effectively paid for. Sometimes the writeoff payment goes directly to the lease company and they then cancel any remaining installments. It all depends on the small print. Some lease contracts actually terminate the lease in the event of a writeoff, so you might not need any Gap insurance at all.

nozzer
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Re: Flooded Car (not mine)

@Strat

Courtesy of Admiral Insurance..

If you have a fully comprehensive car insurance policy you may be able to claim for damage to your vehicle as a result of a flood as long as you’ve taken every precaution to safeguard your car. If you take a risk and drive your car into a flood, you may not be covered for any damage caused.

Most insurers put flood damage into two categories – avoidable flood damage and unavoidable flood damage.  Avoidable damage could be classed as someone driving into flood water – you never know how deep it is.

Six inches of water is enough to reach the bottom of most cars causing potential loss of control and stalling. Cars can float in just 12ins of water while 2ft of water is enough to drag away most cars.

Unavoidable flood damage could be classed as your car getting damaged by floods when it’s parked at its usual spot – such as at home.

billnotben
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Re: Flooded Car (not mine)


@gleneagles wrote:

Reconditioned engine worth considering ?


Back many decades getting a recon put in was common practice. Most of the cars owners I knew did including myself.

Seems hard to believe a bit of wet will write off a nearly new car,

We really are a throw away society.