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Extradition

Community Veteran
Posts: 7,912
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Registered: 02-08-2007

Extradition

Whatever your views on extradition there is something clearly wrong when we can send a businessman over to America but not a terriorist.
The following is an extract from the BBC website,
Retired businessman Christopher Tappin had said he was leaving the UK feeling he had fewer rights than a terrorist.
Mr Tappin, 65, from London, is being flown from Heathrow Airport to El Paso, Texas, escorted by US marshals.
British judges say the extradition is lawful and the European Court of Human Rights has refused to intervene.
24 REPLIES
Community Veteran
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Registered: 30-08-2007

Re: Extradition

As I read it, his case was exhaustively reviewed before the extradition order was signed. No reason was noted to block the extradition, That should be a clue. There is obviously much more that is not being said, other than Mr Tappin proclaiming his innocence. Under the circumstances so would I.
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annerimmington
Grafter
Posts: 127
Registered: 27-01-2012

Re: Extradition

As he pointed out Quatada is free to roam the streets of London (well not quite, but I know what he means), whilst he - a British citizen- can be freely extradited.  I wonder if he took his case to the European Court of Human Rights ?  Does seem barmy that whilst someone, and not even a British subject, and branded "a danger to national security" can be freed on bail, yet a British pensioner - who by no stretch of the imagination can be branded as a threat to national security, can be carted off to face his fate in the US courts (and by all accounts will be leg ironed as soon as he reaches the US) Shocked.      British justice at it`s finest  Roll eyes
Community Veteran
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Registered: 10-08-2007

Re: Extradition

Quote from: annerimmington
I wonder if he took his case to the European Court of Human Rights ? 

It seems he did and the ECHR supported the extradition.
Community Veteran
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Registered: 12-08-2007

Re: Extradition

Yes he exhausted all channels of appeal.  I agree with Petlew, there may be a lot we don't know.
He has his first court appearance in the US on Monday.
annerimmington
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Registered: 27-01-2012

Re: Extradition

Quote from: Oddball
Quote from: annerimmington
I wonder if he took his case to the European Court of Human Rights ?   

It seems he did and the ECHR supported the extradition.

.........yet the ECHR supported Mr Quatada`s bail  Roll eyes   
Community Veteran
Posts: 1,699
Registered: 30-07-2007

Re: Extradition

The main point of difference is that Quatada was being extradited to a country that uses torture to get evidence, and there's no evidence of the USA  using torture to get the evidence it wants  Undecided
PS - maybe we should extradite Quatada to the USA!
Community Veteran
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Re: Extradition

Not only has America used torture in the past but it also has the death penalty. I Thought we never sent (or returned) people to countries that had the death penalty.
OK I am not suggesting he will be subject to either of these but reports from others who have been sent to America confirm the Prisons & Conditions are fairly grim.
No doubt there is a lot more to this case than meets the eye but why all the secrecy, this is the UK not the USSR.
Community Veteran
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Registered: 12-08-2007

Re: Extradition

As I understand it we will not send someone to a country if the death sentence is a possibility and it is not in this case.
Community Veteran
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Registered: 30-07-2007

Re: Extradition

Artmo beat me to it  Huh
Community Veteran
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Re: Extradition

I was reading yesterday that his lawyer said it was highly likely he'd plea bargain to avoid a long sentence if found guilty.
Isn't plea bargaining a tacit admitting culpability?
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Community Veteran
Posts: 1,699
Registered: 30-07-2007

Re: Extradition

Not necessarily.  He may take the view that the chances of  being found guilty (even though he's innocent) are too high.  Americans are known for their xenophobia after all: He's foreign, so he must be guilty.  Undecided
Community Veteran
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Registered: 02-08-2007

Re: Extradition

Quote from: artmo
As I understand it we will not send someone to a country if the death sentence is a possibility and it is not in this case.
OK I am playing with words here but the stress at his age could lead to his death or damage to his physical or mental health.
randpwar
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Registered: 01-08-2007

Re: Extradition

Whatever you or I think about him, Quatada has (I believe) never been charged in Britain with committing a criminal offence; if I’m very wrong please educate me with which law he has broken,  been proved that he broke it, details of the trial, including the judges comments and the sentence handed down. At the end of all this please remind me how long he has been in prison, I think without a trial
Steve
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Re: Extradition

The previous Government – a Labour government I might add – introduced the indefinite detention of terror suspects without trial under part for of the Anti-Terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001. Quatada, along with many others was detained without trial in Belmarsh prison. I consider that policy to be contemptible and, quite rightly, the policy was ruled illegal by the House of Lords in 2004 with Judge Nichols commenting that “Indefinite imprisonment without charge or trial is anathema in any country which observes the rule of law.” What was judged illegal then remains illegal now. There is no lawful means by which a terror suspect can be indefinitely detained absent other factors (such as, in Quatada’s case, being illegally present in the UK).