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Energy saving light bulbs.

James
Grafter
Posts: 21,036
Registered: ‎04-04-2007

Re: Energy saving light bulbs.

I remember that.
Some people were waiting ages :/
ed
Grafter
Posts: 191
Registered: ‎15-08-2007

Re: Energy saving light bulbs.

Well I got my Energy Monitoring Tool for £6.99 this morning Smiley
Here's some interesting results
Pentium M 1.5Ghz Laptop = 30-50 watts (idle - 100% CPU)
Pentium 4 2Ghz + 6200, LCD screen, speakers etc = 130-160
Core 2 Duo 2Ghz + 8600, LCD screen, speakers etc = 130-160 same
Toaster = 950 watts
Microwave = 1400 watts
Kettle = 2000 watts
Gota wait until Thursday until I can get me hands on the cheap autosensing power strips Smiley
VileReynard
Champion
Posts: 11,769
Thanks: 444
Fixes: 16
Registered: ‎01-09-2007

Re: Energy saving light bulbs.

Can I introduce the idea of whether measurement is in watts or VA at this point?  Roll eyes
Things like toasters are a purely resistive load.
Things like PC's (with a switch mode PSU) aren't.
I wonder if a gadget that costs £6-99 can measure appropriately?

"In The Beginning Was The Word, And The Word Was Aardvark."

Rikaitch
Grafter
Posts: 212
Registered: ‎08-06-2007

Re: Energy saving light bulbs.

Quote from: ed
Lidl's got the master/slave socket strips too for £5.99!! (when your computer powers down everything else on the strip powers down too)

Does anyone else get the impression Ed shops at Lidl's too much?  Wink
ed
Grafter
Posts: 191
Registered: ‎15-08-2007

Re: Energy saving light bulbs.

What can i say I'm a poor student.
Just finished my MSc Hons in IT Sytem Development.
I'm still living off Aldi and Lidl food until I can find work  Grin
Axis of evil, it acts like a plug on top of another plug so it can measure the current/amps drawn from the socket much like my electric meter does for billing and multiplies it by the volts 220-240 to get the watts.
VileReynard
Champion
Posts: 11,769
Thanks: 444
Fixes: 16
Registered: ‎01-09-2007

Re: Energy saving light bulbs.

ed: The plug on a plug is just a meter - but how good is the meter?
If the power is drawn by (say) a switch mode PSU (PC) then current is drawn only at the lower voltages - so the current is drawn more like a square wave than a sinusoidal toaster supply.
It doesn't really translate into rms watts.

"In The Beginning Was The Word, And The Word Was Aardvark."

Denzil
Grafter
Posts: 1,733
Registered: ‎31-07-2007

Re: Energy saving light bulbs.

Quote from: axisofevil
Can I introduce the idea of whether measurement is in watts or VA at this point?  Roll eyes
Things like toasters are a purely resistive load.
Things like PC's (with a switch mode PSU) aren't.
I wonder if a gadget that costs £6-99 can measure appropriately?

I thought domestic supplies were all metered in watts anyway, ignoring power factor, and that commercial premises were metered in VA?
VileReynard
Champion
Posts: 11,769
Thanks: 444
Fixes: 16
Registered: ‎01-09-2007

Re: Energy saving light bulbs.

I think you will find that UPS are always rated in VA.

"In The Beginning Was The Word, And The Word Was Aardvark."

itsme
Grafter
Posts: 5,924
Thanks: 2
Registered: ‎07-04-2007

Re: Energy saving light bulbs.

Believe some posters are confusing Switch mode power supplies with linear power supplies which do have a problem with the current being out of phase with the voltage.
Nowadays switch mode power supplies the current is more likely to follow the voltage so the monitors will be close to the power used if not true watt meters
[quote= from Wikipedia]Early switched mode power supplies incorporated a simple full wave rectifier connected to a large energy storing capacitor. Such SMPS draws current from the AC line in short pulses when the mains instantaneous voltage exceeds the voltage across this capacitor. During the remaining portion of the AC cycle the capacitor provides energy to the power supply. As a result, the input current of such basic switched mode power supplies has high harmonic content and relatively low power factor. This creates extra load on utility lines, increases heating of the utility transformers, and may cause stability problems in some applications such as in emergency generator systems or aircraft generators. In 2001 the European Union put into effect the standard IEC/EN61000-3-2 to set limits on the harmonics of the AC input current up to the 40th harmonic for equipment above 75W. The standard defines four classes of equipment depending on its type and current waveform. The most rigorous limits (class D) are established for personal computers, computer monitors, and TV receivers. In order to comply with these requirements modern switched-mode power supplies normally include an additional power factor correction (PFC) stage.
ed
Grafter
Posts: 191
Registered: ‎15-08-2007

Re: Energy saving light bulbs.

I assume it's measuring the amps over time and averages it out. It does fluctuate a bit then settles down to more consistant figure.
It's good to see my Core 2 Duo doesn't use up any more power than my old P4 system even though it's about 4x as fast Smiley
I read someware that some of the Alienware systems were using 420watts just at idle so 160watts at full tilt (including peripherals)is not so bad Cheesy
pcoventry76
Grafter
Posts: 950
Registered: ‎27-08-2007

Re: Energy saving light bulbs.

my elecy bills used to be £90 a quarter - i've always used energy bulbs, i insist on them as they cost on adverage 1p for 5 hours and are just as bright
I've got rid of my PC desktop and got a dual core laptop which runs on standby when not in use.
i find my adverage bill is now around £45 a quarter - as it used to be before i moved.
Community Veteran
Posts: 1,236
Registered: ‎02-08-2007

Re: Energy saving light bulbs.

After having the power meter running for about a week now I have calculated that all of my computers/servers and hardware account for about £40-£45 of my quarterly electric bill. That still leaves over £150 unaccounted for. Hopefully the large number of filiment light bulbs I replaced with the energy saving ones were a siginicant portion of this. My next bill will tell all......
Community Veteran
Posts: 6,983
Thanks: 8
Registered: ‎10-04-2007

Re: Energy saving light bulbs.

Quote from: chillypenguin
I have the same problem, I have been replacing mine slowing, and now I have a bag of filament lamps left over.
Chilly

Ha! I think a lot of people have that very same problem, myself included.  Smiley
MikeWhitehead
Grafter
Posts: 748
Registered: ‎19-08-2007

Re: Energy saving light bulbs.

A (somewhat obvious) suggestion to people running high-end systems (and really, any system) would be to set standby to kick in after an hour or so.
I almost always send my system to standby at night rather than a full shutdown as I normally have important stuff open that would be a big hassle to bring back up. For systems with S3 standby states available, it's a huge money saver and highly recommended.
Also, a good idea for people who have local home network file servers would be to follow the standby methods too. The machines could be set to, say, go to standby after 30 mins and wake up on LAN activity. It means you can save money without needing to switch it off and on all the time (can be a hassle if its in the loft, etc).
A good article regarding this is here.

On the subject of enery saving lightbulbs; may be a stupid question I know but can you get energy saving spotlights these days? I have a few spotlight strips in some rooms of the house. I don't want to get rid of them, but I fancy cutting down costs.
pcoventry76
Grafter
Posts: 950
Registered: ‎27-08-2007

Re: Energy saving light bulbs.

I put my laptop onto standby overnight when not inuse - and i turn the power off - it uses about 10% of the power when standby overnight
When i use it the screen goes off after 2 mins