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Economically inactive? Not for long

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Re: Economically inactive? Not for long

@wotsup 

Indeed, and with my own private pension stripped as it was, I did manage to recover part of it so what small amount I had left could be made up by pension credit - which meant I could retire as planned at sixty years of age.

 

It was a close call and the DWP did have me by the short and curlies for five years, but it all worked out in the end even if it does mean my piffling but we'll served private pension serves to reduce the amount I receive each month.

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Re: Economically inactive? Not for long


@wotsup wrote:

@gleneagles  most of his posts are offensive, 


Snowflake 

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Re: Economically inactive? Not for long


@VileReynard wrote:

I think that some people don't know that there were/are two types of pension:-

An old low rate one which is eligable for Pension Credit because it's so bad.

A new higher rate one which is now paid which is not eligable for Pension Credit.

The decision as to which one you get depends on when you reach your statuary retirement date - 2017(?) - not sure about the year.

Both pensions are earned by paying NI contributions throughout your working life.

Of course its much more complicated than this - loopholes had to be inserted for very high earners.

 


 

My blue

Are you sure about that?

Some time last year I looked at the DWP website and although that would appear to be the case if someone receives the full amount of the 'New State Pension' (I think it was called), if they receive a reduced amount due to having missed some contributions which takes them below the level specified then it appears they can indeed claim Pension Credit.

I don't remember the exact numbers, but ISTR the amount of the full NSP was slightly higher than the amount where PC kicks in.

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Re: Economically inactive? Not for long


@rEUnite wrote:

@wotsup wrote:

@gleneagles  most of his posts are offensive, 


Snowflake 


Says the one who's melting down because the diplomatic vote is being honoured..

I need a new signature... i'm bored of the old one!
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Re: Economically inactive? Not for long


@7up wrote:

Says the one who's melting down because the diplomatic vote is being honoured..


I assume you mean democratic vote.

You confuse ‘melting down’ with exercising my democratic right to campaign to rejoin the EU as soon as possible, while accepting that the current government is honouring the result of the referendum held three and a half years ago.

 

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Re: Economically inactive? Not for long

@rEUnite I think I've asked this question before - and received no answer - but in simple, reasoned English - what's so wonderful about the EU?

You do realise that having left, IF we were to rejoin (very unlikely to the point of infinity), it would be on extremely disadvantageous terms, and would take many years.

As a point of interest, which age group do you fall in, s I can tailor any possible future replies to your knowledge level?

John
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Re: Economically inactive? Not for long


@rEUnite wrote:

@7up wrote:

Says the one who's melting down because the diplomatic vote is being honoured..


I assume you mean democratic vote.

You confuse ‘melting down’ with exercising my democratic right to campaign to rejoin the EU as soon as possible, while accepting that the current government is honouring the result of the referendum held three and a half years ago.

 


Clearly you have failed to keep up with what is going on in the EU........

What is the point in campaigning to rejoin the EU when there is no chance of that in the next 5 years.....

By which time there will be little left of the EU to join....

As for the Snowflake comment I am too old for that.....perhaps you are projecting your feelings on too me as someone who is afraid to embrace change and wishes to stick to the same old ways....

Take those remain posters off your bedroom wall, face the future with a positive and determined outlook and forget the negative stuff otherwise you will get nowhere.

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Re: Economically inactive? Not for long

@jab1 

At a guess I'd say 12, but I could be wrong. 

It might be 13.

As for rejoining never say never as they say, but certainly not for at least another twenty years and when the current generation get that much older - but then they will be older and hopefully wiser so...

The sands are shifting all over Europe and who knows how things will shape up, but for the forseeable why don't we all just knuckle down, get behind Boris and make this work. 

Sorry, but whining whingers are not wanted - well not around here anyway. 

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Re: Economically inactive? Not for long

I think @gleneagles comment above your post says all Ineed, @Minivanman, but you are correct in saying that we need to make divorce work - to our advantage.

John
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Re: Economically inactive? Not for long

t@jab1 

Yes, I am aware that rejoining the EU will be on a different basis from that we previously enjoyed. We would no doubt have to join the Euro and probably also Schengen. Both would be good, in my opinion. There is an interesting article regarding this here

As. For the benefits of being in the EU, here is a list of 98 reasons for staying which were originally from the Campaign to Remain Facebook page, but which I found here. Most would also be good reasons to rejoin, in my opinion.

  1. Membership of the world’s largest trading bloc with over 500 million consumers, representing 23% of global GDP
  2. The UK has greater global influence as a member of the EU
  3. The EU provides a counterweight to the global power of the US, Russia and China
  4. With Trump in the White House the UK’s strongest natural allies are France, Germany and our other West European neighbours
  5. Tariff-free trade within the EU
  6. The abolition of non-tariff barriers (quotas, subsidies, administrative rules etc.) among members
  7. Participation in free trade agreements with Japan and Canada as an EU member
  8. The EU accounts for 44% of all UK exports of goods and services
  9. The EU accounts for 53% of all UK imports of goods and services
  10. Cheaper food and alcohol imports from continental Europe
  11. As a member of the EU the UK maintains a say in the shaping of the rules governing its trade with its European partners
  12. 3.1 million jobs in the UK are directly linked to exports to the EU
  13. Free movement of labour has helped UK firms plug skills gaps (translators, doctors, plumbers)
  14. Free movement of labour has helped address shortages of unskilled workers (fruit picking, catering)
  15. The Single Market has brought the best continental footballers to the Premier League
  16. The EU accounts for 47% of the UK’s stock of inward Foreign Direct Investment (FDI), worth over $1.2 trillion
  17. Access to the EU Single Market has helped attract investment into the UK from outside the EU
  18. No paperwork or customs for UK exports throughout the single market
  19. Price transparency and removal of commissions on currency transactions across the Eurozone
  20. FDI into the UK has effectively doubled since the creation of the EU Single Market
  21. The UK’s net contribution to the EU budget is around €7.3bn, or 0.4% of GDP (less than an eighth of the UK’s defence spending)
  22. No time consuming border checks for travellers (apart from in the UK)
  23. The City of London, as a global financial hub, has acted as a bridge between foreign business and the EU
  24. British banks and insurance companies have been able to operate freely across the EU
  25. Cornwall receives up to £750 million per year from the EU Social Fund (ESF)
  26. Structural funding for areas of the UK hit by industrial decline (South Wales, Yorkshire)
  27. Support for rural areas under the European Agricultural Fund for Regional Development (EAFRD)
  28. EU funding for infrastructure projects in the UK including £122 million for the “Midlands engine” project
  29. Financial support from the EU for over 3,000 small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in the UK
  30. EU funding for the British film industry
  31. EU funding for British theatre, music and dance
  32. EU funding for British sport, including football apprenticeships, tennis and rugby league
  33. Glasgow (1990) and Liverpool (2008) benefitted from being European capitals of culture, stimulating their local economies
  34. EU competition laws protect consumers by combatting monopolistic business practices
  35. Strict controls on the operations of Multinational Corporations (MNCs) in the EU
  36. Human Rights protected under the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights
  37. The death penalty can never be reintroduced as it is incompatible with EU membership
  38. Minority languages such as Welsh and Irish are recognized and protected under EU law
  39. The right to reside in any EU member state
  40. The freedom to work in 28 countries without visa and immigration restrictions
  41. The mutual recognition of professional qualifications has facilitated the free movement of engineers, teachers and doctors across the EU
  42. The mutual recognition of educational diplomas
  43. The Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) has standardized assessment of language proficiency across the EU
  44. The freedom to study in 28 countries (many EU universities teach courses in English and charge lower fees than in the UK)
  45. The Erasmus programme of university exchanges (benefitting 16000 UK students a year)
  46. The freedom to set up a business in 28 countries
  47. The ability to retire in any member state
  48. Pension transferability
  49. The right to vote in local and European Parliamentary elections if resident in any member state
  50. EU laws making it easier for British people to buy property on the continent
  51. The right to receive emergency healthcare in any member state (EHIC card)
  52. Consular protection from any EU embassy outside the EU
  53. The EU has played a leading role in combatting global warming (Paris 2015 climate change conference)
  54. Common EU greenhouse gas emissions targets (19% reduction from 1990 to 2015)
  55. Improvements in air quality (significant reductions in sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides) as a result of EU legislation
  56. Reductions in sewage emissions
  57. Improvements in the quality of beaches and bathing water
  58. EU standards on the quality of drinking water
  59. Restrictions on landfill dumping
  60. EU targets for recycling
  61. Common EU regulations on the transportation and disposal of toxic waste
  62. The implementation of EU policies to reduce noise pollution in urban areas
  63. EU policies have stimulated offshore wind farms
  64. Strict safety standards for cars, buses and trucks
  65. Protection of endangered species and habitats (EU Natura 2000 network)
  66. Strict ban on animal testing in the cosmetics industry
  67. Membership of the European Medicines Agency (EMA) which monitors the quality and safety of medicines (until recently located in London)
  68. 13% of EU budget earmarked for scientific research and innovation
  69. The UK receives £730 million a year in EU funding for research
  70. EU funding for UK universities
  71. Cooperation in the peaceful use of nuclear energy as a member of Euratom
  72. Minimum paid annual leave and time off work (Working Time Directive)
  73. Equal pay between men and women enshrined in European law since 1957
  74. The right to work no more than 48 hours a week without paid overtime
  75. Minimum guaranteed maternity leave of 14 weeks for pregnant women
  76. Rights to a minimum 18 weeks of parental leave after child birth
  77. EU anti-discrimination laws governing age, religion and sexual orientation
  78. EU rules governing health and safety at work
  79. The rights to collective bargaining and trade union membership are enshrined in EU employment law
  80. The UK enjoys an opt out from the single currency and maintains full control of its borders as a non-member of the Schengen area
  81. Since 1985 the UK has received a budget rebate equivalent to 66% of its net contribution to the EU budget
  82. EU cross-country coordination offers greater protection from terrorists, pedophiles, people traffickers and cyber-crime
  83. The European common arrest warrant
  84. Europe-wide patent and copyright protection
  85. EU consumer protection laws concerning transparency and product guarantees of quality and safety
  86. Improved food labeling
  87. A ban on growth hormones and other harmful food additives
  88. Cheaper air travel due to EU competition laws
  89. Common EU air passenger rights
  90. Deregulation of the European energy market has increased consumer choice and lowered prices
  91. Mutual recognition of the common European driving license
  92. The introduction of the European pet passport
  93. The abolition of mobile telephone roaming charges
  94. The EU acts as a guarantor of the Irish Good Friday Agreement
  95. A frictionless Irish border
  96. The EU acts as a guarantor of the special status of Gibraltar
  97. The EU helped support and maintain democracy in Spain, Portugal and Greece from the 1970s and these countries have become major destinations for British tourists
  98. EU membership has helped facilitate intercultural dialogue

As for wishing to know my age so you can tailor your replies to my ‘knowledge level’ - don’t be so patronising.

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Re: Economically inactive? Not for long

Jesus, just what we need, another lazy arsed cut n paste addict that actually expects us to read it all.

Remind you of anyone?

@jab1 

Yes indeed, that post just before mine and said more or less the same thing. Time frame debatable and five years as suggested by @gleneagles  would be if Boris really is a fool and makes a complete pigs ear of that clear mandate and his massive majority.

If we don't get 'Brexit done' properly then it's Boris that will be done - well and truly.

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Re: Economically inactive? Not for long


@Minivanman wrote:

Sorry, but whining whingers are not wanted - well not around here anyway. 


No need to be sorry - just pack your bags and go.

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Re: Economically inactive? Not for long


@Minivanman wrote:

Jesus, just what we need, another lazy arsed cut n paste addict that actually expects us to read it all.


If you can’t be bothered reading it, then you would be the lazy arsed one, would you not? I was asked a questions, and I responded.

How about you giving 98 reasons why leaving is so great?

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Re: Economically inactive? Not for long

Interesting long list of 'benefits' there, @rEUnite , but a lot of them don't actually need to have 'EU' in front of them, they could and maybe would have been introduced by an independent UK administration, and some needed international agreement, not just that of the EU.

I'm not going to deconstruct that list - I have neither the time nor the inclination, suffice to say that I suspect many of the important developments would occur naturally over time as the world 'shrinks' due to technological advances.

I was not being 'patronising' in asking your age bracket - merely wondering what I needed to put in my answers to make them understandable.

John
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Re: Economically inactive? Not for long

@rEUnite 

And what about those of us who couldn't give a flying fig about football or anything to do with it?