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Ear drops

Community Veteran
Posts: 3,181
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Registered: 31-07-2007

Ear drops

So a dose of flu and a ear infection so I have the joy of using ear drops[Otosporin].  So never having used ear drops before, should the solution be totally absorbed by the inner ear?
I apply the drops and keep my head on the side for 10 minutes or so but no matter what they solution will come out, same deal last night and then over 30 minutes as it was the last application of the day and I was in bed on my side before I turned.
So either I am doing something wrong or the infection is blocking the solution from being absorbed.
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17 REPLIES
Community Veteran
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Registered: 06-11-2007

Re: Ear drops

No you are not doing something wrong..... ear drops work on the surface of the skin..... so do not expect them to be asborbed... 10 mins is adequate... just use a bit of tissue to mop up the remains...
Community Veteran
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Registered: 30-08-2007

Re: Ear drops

There's an easier way, insert drops, have a small plug of cotton wool at hand that has been dipped in Vaseline, this should seal the drops in. While your head is over inserting the drops, massage that area just in front of the ear (where that square of cartilage is) this should ensure the drops soak right inside the ear.
Horrible things ear infections, can make you very dizzy as well.
Experience; is something you gain, just after you needed it most.

When faced with two choices, simply toss a coin. It works not because it settles the question for you. But because in that brief moment while the coin is in the air. You suddenly know what you are hoping for.
Community Veteran
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Registered: 31-07-2007

Re: Ear drops

Ah thanks for quick replies, we can rely on PN forum with straight answers.
@Petlew Yep, lost all hearing in right ear so balance etc is all over the place, just hoping the loss of hearing is temporary.
Unvalued customer since 2001 funding cheap internet for others / DSL/Fibre house move 24 month regrade from 8th May 2017
Community Veteran
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Registered: 30-08-2007

Re: Ear drops

Should be, but can take a little while to return to normal completely though.
Experience; is something you gain, just after you needed it most.

When faced with two choices, simply toss a coin. It works not because it settles the question for you. But because in that brief moment while the coin is in the air. You suddenly know what you are hoping for.
Community Veteran
Posts: 7,149
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Registered: 30-08-2007

Re: Ear drops

Have found that the "loss of equilibrium" deafness etc. coupled that you've got probably as the result of a heavy cold or flu, can bring on a feeling of impending doom!!
Experience; is something you gain, just after you needed it most.

When faced with two choices, simply toss a coin. It works not because it settles the question for you. But because in that brief moment while the coin is in the air. You suddenly know what you are hoping for.
pierre_pierre
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Registered: 30-07-2007

Re: Ear drops

A) In no way should the drops go through the inner ear, unless you have a perforated eardrum.
B) I suffer from earwax and have to occasionally use drops, always put a cotton wool bumg into the ear
C) I had a bad dose last year while on Holiday, went completely deaf in the right ear.  took me nearly a week to get the wax out.  You can use warmed  up Olive oil to soften wax, but should use a propriety solution for infection.
annerimmington
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Registered: 27-01-2012

Re: Ear drops

Best thing I`ve discovered for a build up of ear wax is half a teaspoon of bicarb of soda mixed in half a small wineglass of warm (not hot) water.    Using a medicinal dropper put a couple drops in each ear. Use twice a day until wax dissolves.    Really does work - less messy than olive oil.
http://www.ehow.com/about_6454080_sodium-bicarbonate-drops_.html
Community Veteran
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Re: Ear drops

For an earwax build up I use warm olive oil and let it soak for around an hour. Then use a rubber bulb ear washer to whoosh warm water into the ear to wash out the wax. The same as they do in the doctors surgery. But as I understand it you should never do this often as it can encourage more wax production.
I had a recent bad ear infection and it really effected my equilibrium but only when laying down. Had to sleep sitting up for a few days until the "seasick" pills kicked in. Laying down was like being on the end result of a major bender without the "fun" of the drinking bit.
Community Veteran
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Re: Ear drops

Mrs Adair is a Nurse Practitioner with many year's experience.  At her clinic the advice is, when there's no infection, use ear wax removing drops to soften and remove wax. They don't syringe ears because of evidence based practice which shows it is likely to cause damage. Finally the maxim she learned to advise patients over the years is do put nothing smaller than your elbow into your ear.
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Community Veteran
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Registered: 30-08-2007

Re: Ear drops

I've suffered with ear wax build-up since childhood. I also seem to have an unusually narrow tract to the ear-drum, requiring a doctor or nurse to use the narrowest available tube on their viewing device (sorry don't know what that scope is called) about the size usually used for small children.
The ex-Mrs P, used to swear by a weak solution of hydrogen peroxide to dissolve wax. I can testify this works well but can be quite noisy as the hubble bubble of the melting wax is heard very well. Indeed one of our GP's over the years actually recommended it. It can leave the ears feeling a bit raw afterwards though.
You can buy in any chemist a dropper bottle of Bi-carb solution for the treatment of wax, When due for a routine syringe-out, I now use this in preference to olive oil that the surgery nurse suggest. Indeed when the appointment with the nurse for syringing comes around the wax has largely dispersed, leaving only a few small flakes to syringe out.
Our GP during the 70's was an WW2 ex-RAF flight surgeon. Fighter pilots in particular suffered serious ear problems with wax, that needed to be dealt with quickly. On arrival in his surgery with a wax problem, he would take a blunt round ended wooden stick and break up the wax with it, spin the stick and out it would come, all over in a few seconds. He'd probably be struck-off for doing it now.
Experience; is something you gain, just after you needed it most.

When faced with two choices, simply toss a coin. It works not because it settles the question for you. But because in that brief moment while the coin is in the air. You suddenly know what you are hoping for.
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Re: Ear drops

I too have the joy of ear wax build up and have to have my ears syringed every 6 months or so as my ear (bizarrely only one!) gets totally blocked and drops alone won't shift it. There isn't any warning just wake up deaf.
Agree with petlew that bi-carb drops are, for me, the best at softening the wax. It's interesting how the syringing technology has changed years ago it use to be a massive manual large syringe where they just blasted your ear.
Now they use a tool which has a very small, pulsating jet of heated water which the can control with great accuracy lessening greatly the risk to ear damage.
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Community Veteran
Posts: 7,149
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Registered: 30-08-2007

Re: Ear drops

I well remember the blast from the huge brass syringe. The machine used nowadays are available to buy if you want one and can be used at home http://www.amazon.co.uk/product-reviews/B002QAUY2G/ref=dp_top_cm_cr_acr_txt?ie=UTF8&showViewpoints=1 In fairness they're not especially cheap, but they do work.
The ear scope is called a otoscope by the way.
I did try the propriety remedy Otex for a while, apart from making my ears very sore I didn't find it did anything for the wax at all.
Concur with dvorak, I also am afflicted in one ear, the left one, while the right does get some wax, the left one can get really impacted with the stuff. I wonder why.
Edit: When using the machine above, you need someone who can use an otoscope to check it has actually removed all the wax, In the surgery the nurse often needs two or three goes at it, which is probably why its better to have it done there.
Experience; is something you gain, just after you needed it most.

When faced with two choices, simply toss a coin. It works not because it settles the question for you. But because in that brief moment while the coin is in the air. You suddenly know what you are hoping for.
Community Veteran
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Registered: 23-09-2010

Re: Ear drops

I was told by my doctor that some wax softening drops can make things worse. In that if the wax is softened and isn't removed the end result is that it will just compact into one hard large lump.
I used to have my ears very occasionally syringed by the doctors but they used cold water which was uncomfortable and when you do it yourself you know exactly when the jobs done.
Community Veteran
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Re: Ear drops

Quote from: AlaricAdair
Mrs Adair is a Nurse Practitioner with many year's experience.  At her clinic the advice is, when there's no infection, use ear wax removing drops to soften and remove wax. They don't syringe ears because of evidence based practice which shows it is likely to cause damage. Finally the maxim she learned to advise patients over the years is do put nothing smaller than your elbow into your ear.
That's quite interesting. Have had my ears done at the local health centre using one of the devices mentioned in an earlier post with a link to Amazon.
It's a bit worrying that one GP will use it whilst another will not. The question is why not ? If there is sufficient evidence it can do damage it should not be used equally if the opposite is true then it should be available for use.