cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Dogs in cars

Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 16,512
Thanks: 1,774
Fixes: 121
Registered: 06-04-2007

Dogs in cars

SWMBO frequently takes my mum's dog, a border collie, with them when she takes my mum out and they spend time in the park. The dog travels in the luggage compartment of the Zafira and I am certain that the dog must be restrained/restricted from entering the passenger compartment.
[quote=https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/69549/pb10308-dogs-cats-welfare-060215.pdf]If  the dog is travelling in the luggage compartment of an estate car or hatchback, you should fit a secure dog-guard, and the floor should have a non-slip surface.
My bold.
The word 'should' indicates to me that it doesn't have to whereas if they used the word 'must' it would be compulsory. I have searched elsewhere but can't find clarification.
I want to get a dog guard but SWMBO is against it would my prove inconvenient when changing the seating configuration.
Can anyone confirm how the law stands on this as I'd hate for her to be pulled over and fined.
I know the dangers of a loose animal in the car both as a distraction to the driver and the potential harm facing the dog and/or people in the event of sharp braking or accident.
If it was down to me I'd never have an animal in the car anyway Lips are sealed

Forum Moderator and Customer
Courage is resistance to fear, mastery of fear, not absence of fear - Mark Twain
He who feared he would not succeed sat still

5 REPLIES
Community Veteran
Posts: 3,380
Thanks: 2
Registered: 18-01-2013

Re: Dogs in cars

Not sure on the law side of things but a true story ......
One of my friends was a passenger in a car driven by someone who was not in a fit state to drive (it wasn't his car either but that is another story).
He came off the road and hit a tree. My friend was wearing a seatbelt, the passenger behind him wasn't.
My friend was crushed by the passenger and fatally injured. He died that night. The passenger who wasn't wearing a seatbelt survived with relatively minor injuries.
Lots to be learned here, his death (20 years ago) has probably saved a few lives since. He was a good bloke and a much loved colleague and his death hit a lot of us very hard.
Community Veteran
Posts: 18,543
Thanks: 190
Registered: 12-08-2007

Re: Dogs in cars

Maybe the RSPCA could offer some advice.
Community Veteran
Posts: 4,592
Thanks: 750
Fixes: 3
Registered: 06-11-2014

Re: Dogs in cars

It's simple logic to fit a dog guard when you have an animal in the back, if not to prevent it from freely hopping about, it would also stop a similar incident to Dom S's story there with the animal being unrestrained hurtling through the car and potentially killing the occupants, same for luggage too that people pile up in the back but don't secure it, ends up as a projectile (or multiple projectiles) hurtling at the speed the car was going before it came to a dead stop...
Community Veteran
Posts: 1,769
Thanks: 33
Fixes: 1
Registered: 08-10-2010

Re: Dogs in cars

Gets one that is simple to fit. We had one similar to this one, and it was perfectly adequate (doesn't take a minute to install and stores in a small bag in the boot too). That said, I would not recommend it if your dog goes crazy when you are driving, but it's perfectly fine for a normal, well behaved dog.
Not going to break the back either. Wink
http://m.ebay.co.uk/itm/391089406235?nav=SEARCH
itsme
Grafter
Posts: 5,924
Thanks: 1
Registered: 07-04-2007

Re: Dogs in cars

From the Highway Code
Quote
57
When in a vehicle make sure dogs or other animals are suitably restrained so they cannot distract you while you are driving or injure you, or themselves, if you stop quickly. A seat belt harness, pet carrier, dog cage or dog guard are ways of restraining animals in cars.

Quote
Although failure to comply with the other rules of The Highway Code will not, in itself, cause a person to be prosecuted, The Highway Code may be used in evidence in any court proceedings under the Traffic Acts (see The road user and the law) to establish liability. This includes rules which use advisory wording such as ‘should/should not’ or ‘do/do not’.