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Deaths in the NHS

Community Veteran
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Deaths in the NHS

The majority of needless deaths in the NHS were a result of neglect but it also included a few hundred patients who either had a medical instrument left in them or had the wrong operation including amputation of the incorrect body part.
Must admit I am puzzled by this, virtually all medical instruments are metal so a quick body scan or x-ray would reveal if something had been left behind, all instruments in a theater are counted before and after use so it hard to see how this could happen.
Equally removing the wrong body part seems odd, surely the surgeon will have seen the patient prior to an operation and often mark where an incision is going to be made and other members of the team will be present during the operation with full access to the notes so how do these things happen or to be more accurate be allowed to keep happening, once should be enough so procedures should be put in place to prevent it happening in the future, if it's down to staff failing to follow an agreed procedure they should not be allowed to continue in that position as they clearly pose a risk to others.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-22998570
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Community Veteran
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Re: Deaths in the NHS

Who knows but having almost been one of those accidental deaths in the NHS I can assure you it does happen.
I need a new signature... i'm bored of the old one!
Community Veteran
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Re: Deaths in the NHS

@gleneagles, I have to agree that it seems strange that such errors can occur and they can only be down to negligence in not following procedures.  We must remember though that these errors are a very tiny part of the number of procedures carried out.  The vast majority of operations are completed satisfactorily.
Community Veteran
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Re: Deaths in the NHS

I'm sure there has been cases where the patient has actually got a marker pen and written on themselves this arm or this leg or something like that?
Personally if I was in that position I think I would.
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Re: Deaths in the NHS

I'm fuming at out local hospital - my wife is recovering from a fairly major operation to sort out issues caused by their neglect a few years ago.
I won't go into too many details but when I went to pick her up they had lost her .... she was in the recovery room and nobody had bothered to tell the shift that had taken over.
Then a few years later, she was having a few "womens" problems so went to the docs. They found out that something that was meant to have been taken out during her operation (and was in her notes as such) had been left in.
She was having some serious issues so a month ago went to a private hospital under her medical insurance and while doing a hysterectomy, had to remove an ovary as the other hospital had clamped a tube too close to the ovary and it was rubbing causing issues and cysts.
Very not impressed and don't get me started on the care the NHS gave my Gran a year or so ago - she'd be dead if we hadn't intervened and made sure they were looking after her according to her condition Sad
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Re: Deaths in the NHS

During the last few days of my late wife's stay in hospital we suspect something happened on the night shift that exacerbated her condition.
She tried to tell us something but was unable to communicate properly due to her state of health.
We never did have anything definite to pursue with the hospital.
She died in the hospital.
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Re: Deaths in the NHS

Community Veteran
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Re: Deaths in the NHS

Maybe the blanket insurance the NHS provides for their staff doesn't help and encourages cover ups.
If doctors and the like had to provide their own insurance, like those in private practices, they would have to be more alert and careful.
More than a few mistakes, no matter how minor, and the doctor (or nurse) would find no insurance company would touch them with a barge pole.
That would effectively be the, well deserved, end of their careers.
Instead in some hospitals we have had hundreds dying where it's been acknowledged they could have survived with proper care. And no one has really been brought to book over it. Every day more and more avoidable tragedies are exposed despite the best efforts of the (don't) Care Quality Commission to cover them up.
Community Veteran
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Re: Deaths in the NHS

Doctors do provide their own insurance through one of their professional bodies. This is part of the checks made on them before they are allowed to work within the NHS.
Obviously NHS organisations are also insured and are often sued for errors.
Community Veteran
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Re: Deaths in the NHS

Obviously doctors have and need their own insurance for the private work they undertake in hospitals and their own practices but the NHS insurance covers them in financial responsibility for negligence in their contractual work.
Community Veteran
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Re: Deaths in the NHS

Not all doctors work in the private sector.  They do all carry their own insurance.  It's a requirement of their right to practice.
itsme
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Re: Deaths in the NHS

[quote=http://www.gmc-uk.org/doctors/information_for_doctors/14195.asp]At present, there are no express statutory requirements or provisions dealing with professional indemnity arrangements for registered medical practitioners or those seeking registration with the GMC. There is no compulsory statutory requirement for any doctor to be a member of a medical defence organisation or to have professional indemnity or insurance arrangements.
Community Veteran
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Re: Deaths in the NHS

Why not quote the full article Undecided Undecided  Undecided
Quote
However, since 1997, Good medical practice has placed a professional duty on doctors to have such arrangements in place. Paragraph 63 of Good medical practice provides that a doctor 'must make sure [they] have adequate insurance or indemnity cover so that [their] patients will not be disadvantaged if they make a claim aboutthe clinical care [they]have provided in the UK'.

In practise a doctor would not be employed in the NHS otherwise.
itsme
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Re: Deaths in the NHS

Your statement was
Quote from: artmo
Not all doctors work in the private sector.  They do all carry their own insurance.  It's a requirement of their right to practice.

and it's not a requirement as the GMC does not make it statutory but only advise as good working practice.
petangus
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Registered: 23-06-2013

Re: Deaths in the NHS

Shocked The part I am glad about is this Government is now going to test Doctors every few years.
I have come across the nhs staff Doctors included who no way have they been taught how to care for the sick.  After they have worked in  the NHS with I don't think any checks on them they move to Atos examering people for the benefits or legal people making shed loads of money.
Some of the questions they ask are daft and they don't know what you are talking  about if it is not a common ilness.
Those test can't come soon enough but who is going to do the tests?