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Daft over Dogs

Minivanman
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Daft over Dogs

Sorry, but I just don't get it.

Why are folks willing to fork out hundreds of pounds for a dog when there are so many that need homes. A family member not exactly rolling on money (a bit like me) is proposing to spend over five hundred smackers on a puppy. 

Are they barking mad, or am I missing something? Crazy2

 

All views expressed are my own but you can express them too if you want to be right about everything like I am.
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Re: Daft over Dogs

Yeah.... and don`t forget the "on-going" running costs.... food... beauty parlour... vets bills/pet insurance... ... kennels when going away,... and family won`t look after it.. 

 

Of course, if it is a bitch... then there is a chance you can get some money back from the pups it has...

 

 

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Re: Daft over Dogs

A lot of dogs needing homes have been ill-treated and/or abused and may have behavioural problems or be aggressive which could be something some people don't want to have to take on.

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Re: Daft over Dogs

I've been on both sides. When I was unemployed I got a dog from the local home. He was great but had loads of issues. He was very aggressive to other male dogs, and protective of us. But he was an Alsation/Rough Collie X, I put a lot of it down to the breed.
But he lived with us for 10 years and was sorely missed.
After he died we didn't get another dog for 18 months. The camp site we used regularly had pups, we got one, only when we collected were we told the cost £450! If I hadn't already played and got ready for him to come home I wouldn't have paid.
He is now 10, daft as a brush and on tablets for arthritis.

If you have the money then by all means get a pedigree pup, but I would happily get another dog from the home. You just have to retain them out of the bad habits, mind you plenty of people with "new" dogs have bad habits, they don't know how to train the dog properly (just like the kids).
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Re: Daft over Dogs

As a dog admirers, we spent (thirty years ago) £400 on a Golden Retriever pup, a huge amount on a dog in those days. We had purchased her from an entirely reputable (we thought) kennels in Surrey, . She was gorgeous to look at, but up to about a year old then it all started to go wrong.

At about the point where she started to lose her puppy shape and begin to look a grown Retriever she was becoming very difficult to train in basic lead walking skills, she rebelled and disorganised training classes she was taken to, to the point that we were asked not to bring her any more. The only time she was really happy was in water when she would swim all day if she could and, be extremely difficult to get out of it when necessary.

She was just about nearing her full grown size when she started to become aggressive at home and guarded to point where she wouldn't let us in without fearsome growling and snapping. Most unlike Golden Retriever activity

We went away on holiday, and left her with a couple of friends of ours who already had two (perfectly behaved, and much the inspiration for our purchase ) Golden Retrievers. The couple met us at the airport with our dog in a serious huff, demanding we take our dog away from them immediately, our retriever had terrorised our friends dogs, attempted to keep our friends out of their house, they lived in a cottage in several acres of woodland with some muddy pools, our dog had spent all its time rolling happily in the mud and liberally covering their furniture in the mud.

I began to research the kennels of purchase as they dismissed our complaints out of hand with the view it was our fault that the dog was so unlike the breed. It turned out the kennels had been prosecuted several times for being involved in intense puppy farming (they were closed down a few years later) that probably lead to the behavioural problems we were seeing.

In the mean time it was quite obvious that we and our dog would have to part company as she was making our lives a misery, Mrs P was becoming genuinely afraid of her, something the dog almost certainly recognised and exploited.

In desperation, rather than have her destroyed - which was our vets opinion what we should do - I contacted the RAF, who gladly took her knowing her history as a trainee guard dog.

The moral; check thoroughly who you are buying a supposedly pedigree dog from.

Experience; is something you gain, just after you needed it most.

When faced with two choices, simply toss a coin. It works not because it settles the question for you. But because in that brief moment while the coin is in the air. You suddenly know what you are hoping for.
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Re: Daft over Dogs

I'm afraid to my mind, thousands of years ago keeping dogs around the place was a practical advantage.

That practical advantage has long since gone for most people.

Working dogs are one thing but as household pets...no.

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Minivanman
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Re: Daft over Dogs

I'm sure there are practical advantages as well @Strat to having a dog as a pet.

Good company for the lonely and a pal to have around, a nice well behaved dog brought up with a family and treated well shows how we can respect and care for other creatures - some farmers take note. My concern is as said, the amount people are prepared to pay and often at the expense of other needs.

One of life's balances I guess but my favour leans as it always has towards giving unwanted dogs a decent home even if they do have issues as whose fault is that usually?

We are now pet and dog poop free after having an unwanted Jack Russell for a good few years. The previous owner had bought it on a whim at a cost of at least a couple of hundred quid, but one grown up 'no longer a puppy' dog needing exercise and attention and one owner who was never at home to look after it (that's another beef of mine by the way) meant that we had a great little mate who had a great little life.

No more dog hairs all over place although we'll never get rid of them from the car, no more buying tins of dog food, no more putting the dog out when the grandchildren come over (what did I do wrong? he seemed to ask) and no more walking in the rain when I'd rather be watching telly in the warm! 

Do we miss the little chap? You bet your life Sad

All views expressed are my own but you can express them too if you want to be right about everything like I am.
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Re: Daft over Dogs

We have had dogs, cats, fish and birds, none of which I have welcomed into my home willingly.

They were all brought in by other family members.

Most are now buried in the garden, others have moved on.

I'm well away of other creatures that I share my home with so don't see the need to add more.

I currently have a cat that I was emotionally blackmailed into taking in and will feed and cloth it as required but I'd rather not have to.

I'm quite happy with my own company and regular visits to family.

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Jonpe
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Re: Daft over Dogs

My parents took in two dogs that had been ill-treated; one was too psychologically damaged and had to be put down, but the other one turned out to be a very intelligent dog and ideally suited to his new role as family pet.  He would take long walks with my father and enjoy playing with the grandchildren.  What impressed me most is that he seemed to understand what was said to him, e.g. I remember once he was told (without any gesturing) to go and lie on the settee, but when he went to the wrong one, my father just said, "No, not that one, the little one", and he obediently moved along to the one he was told to go to.

As shutter pointed out, it can be expensive keeping a pet.  I remember watching the first series of Supervet where someone was asked to pay about £30,000 to have their cat 'put back together again' after it had been hit by a car.  It's amazing what that guy can do, but I don't think I'd be prepared to pay that price (not that I could afford to anyway).

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Re: Daft over Dogs

Never had a dog or any other animal.

Often wondered about it but the cost of insurance, food etc was not the main factor against me getting one. It was having to leave the dog in kennels whilst away on holiday, not a problem if you restrict holidays to this country but a non starter if you go abroad.

My daughter has a dog/cat and leaves them in kennels, they both seem distressed to be left that way.

Equally with exercise, to take a dog to some of the places I walk would be dangerous for a dog, safe if you stick to the path but a dog is unlikely to do that.

Clearly pets give much pleasure to people and many people near where I live have dogs, fortunately they look after them ok but I have been in areas where people are working all day and the dog is left in the house, often barking and causing annoyance to neighbours.

Luzern
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Re: Daft over Dogs

When I was little more than a toddler, the house gained Pickles from the Battersea Dogs Home, lovely but highly strung and had to be put down. She was bright as well, and one night got well of my sister's boy friend on his 1.5 mile walk to the bus,to be found siting in it waiting. Next and last and last was Ben, mainly a Manchester Terrier and Collie, who enjoyed chasing the poultry farmer's chickens, when they strayed, and trying to climb trees in the neighbouring orchard. He lasted 15 years until I got demobbed. He died soon after my return.

In those war time years and for some time after our dogs and cats were loved, but special food was not to be had, so they existed on our scraps, bones and biscuits, and for conditioning Bob Martins powders. Most folk,having little money had no sentimentality of having a pet put down, if it suffered, or grew big enough for the pot or oven.

The times gave no room for that!

No one has to agree with my opinion, but in the time I have left a miracle would be nice.
Minivanman
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Re: Daft over Dogs

Pros and cons of owning dogs of course, but it still comes down to why would somebody pay hundreds of pounds for one. 

Only had to put a dog down twice. Once when our family dog it was old, infirm and in pain, and once when the Vet wanted £800 to do an operation on the dog's dried out tear ducts, and one she had never done before! No insurance to hand so no dog and one would you believe very annoyed Vet. The dog in question by the way was a five year old Westie we'd given a home to after it's owner (and my Aunt) went to live in New Zealand..... and they were not very happy having the dog put down either!

Ah well.  

PS. That 'family dog' cost us 2/6d from some skanky family. What a bargain and what a cracking fella he was. 

 

All views expressed are my own but you can express them too if you want to be right about everything like I am.
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Re: Daft over Dogs

I'll never have any pets ever again. When I lived with my ex-wife and her two daughters at one time we had 6 cats, 7 dogs, a goldfish and a hampster. I hated so many pets, not just because of the cost but also the smell (once one did a little job the rest seemed to want to follow suitKnuppel)

 

Eventual the all dies or had to be put down due to old age. This always upset the girls and I could never understand why the ex would give in and get more. Eventually I just put my foot down.

 

Once they had all gone I rescued a poor Jack Russell mix (never knew what else was in there) for my daughter who was around 4/5 and she lasted around 13/14 years (we never knew her exact age). When we moved to Herne Bay £400. That was in 2003 and she is still alive now although quite slow in her movements.

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Re: Daft over Dogs


Minivanman wrote:

but it still comes down to why would somebody pay hundreds of pounds for one.

 


But you could apply that to almost anything ?

for example I have seen some really good paintings by street artists that cost £10 - £20 whilst some of the paintings you see in galleries which they want thousands of pounds for are only fit for the dustbin (IMO)

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Re: Daft over Dogs

My avatar is our current dog a lurcher who is a deer hound greyhound cross. We got him from an owner who kept dogs in a kennel for various sports but he had picked him up from a sports fair going cheap because he had been used for lamping in Ireland but was rejected because he wasn't agressive enough. It was too gentle which suited us and now he is a couch potato, very low maintenance. He eats kibble and sleeps in the back conservatory because he is really a kennel dog. We always go to dogs homes or rescue dogs

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