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DIY Dad

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Aspiring Legend
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DIY Dad

One of my daughters phoned to tell me that her washing machine is making a loud noise and after getting her to check the obvious such as it being badly loaded, blocked waste... or even the cat stuck inside, I called over to check out what the problem might be.

What I've found is that when turning the drum by hand, along with a slight vibration there is a definite rumble - so before I drag the machine out which is always a heavy awkward job, do other DIY Dads (or Mums) think it might have a worn bearing of sorts, is it an easy fix, or is it best to call out a proper repair guy to take a look.

I'm thinking because her machine is now seven years old and been well used, rather than pay for a £50 call-out charge or whatever along with what may be an expense part, that it might be worth just buying a brand new machine.

I'm all for fix and repair if I can rather than just scrapping, but any thoughts guys?

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Pro
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Re: DIY Dad

Alot of washing machines these days have a plastic sealed drum which makes it virtually impossible to change the drum bearings.
Indesit are the worst. Coming in at just over £200 for a new drum assembly. Now days it's cheaper to buy a new washer
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Anonymous
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Re: DIY Dad


@Minivanman wrote:

 

I'm thinking because her machine is now seven years old and been well used, rather than pay for a £50 call-out charge or whatever along with what may be an expense part, that it might be worth just buying a brand new machine.

I'm all for fix and repair if I can rather than just scrapping, but any thoughts guys?


 

I would buy a new one.

 

At seven years old, other parts may be about to fail.

 

And with a new m/c you will get at least one years guarantee, maybe more.

 

You may also find an extended warranty is not that expensive.

 

A new one will probably be more energy efficient, and able to wash at lower temperatures.

 

 

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Re: DIY Dad


@Shep41 wrote: Indesit are the worst. Coming in at just over £200 for a new drum assembly. Now days it's cheaper to buy a new washer

Yep, dead right. Its where I was last year. Rumble rumble. Being repair minded I thought I'd get a bearing kit, job done. Found some website online with lots of parts. Couldn't find a bearing kit for my Indesit. E-mailed them and got a reply back, have to buy a drum complete. Note, the drum didn't include heater etc. That would have to be transferred over. Cost for the drum, around £250. New machine, next model up from my washer dryer (on special offer) £280 with free delivery. No brainer really.

 

@Minivanman  You could always enter the model number online to see if there is a bearing kit but cheaper models tend to have what they call a moulded drum. And at 7 yrs it'll be nearly knackered anyway unless you live in a soft water area.

Ever helpful. Grin Sure, I’d love to help you out. Now which way did you come in?
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Re: DIY Dad

@Minivanman   Like you,..... in days of old......  replacing the bearings, would not be a problem... but... bear in mind you are now over 3 score years and ten.... not  2 score years and 5 ! ! ! ..

If you did manage to do all the struggling, of finding the "correct" or "replacement" bearing from "other sources".... and then struggled to get the machine into some kind of safe working area.... if you did manage to extricate the old bearing without damaging the seating... if you did manage to get the new bearings in place... If you did manage to return the machine to it`s working space... how long before your repair would need doing again...? 

 

Nah ,. mate .give up before you start.... lay out the £200 or whatever, and give her a prezzy... and you..... get on with the rest of your "retirement"  ! !  Cheesy

 

Simples !  Roll_eyes

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Anonymous
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Re: DIY Dad

Yep, have to agree with @shutter here @Minivanman life's to short to be up to your elbows in limescale deposits. As has been mentioned before repairing the bearing might only be the start, next could be the heater element, the water pump, the inlet solenoids; I could go on. Best to get a new machine getting the deliver company to take away and recycle the old one.

If the rear drum housing is aluminium it could be very fragile at this age and could very easily be broken when you try to pull the bearings out. Go all Cadbury's Caramel on it and take it easy, replacing it's by far the easiest and quickest option.

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Re: DIY Dad

Our bearings went on a machine and like everyone else repair wasn't cost effective.
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Re: DIY Dad

We have bought from AO.com a few times and their prices are good with excellent delivery and service ( between 8 and 9 am on morning of delivery they let you know to within an hours slot when they are delivering).  AO even have a large local sales centre on industrial estate by us where you can browse and take the appliance away with you ( or get it delivered as normal ) - great prices too.

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Re: DIY Dad

Thanks for all your replies guys. much appreciated.

I just need to confirm it is the drum bearing and one thing I did not think to check - and I should have done because I had done it before on cars - was to see if there was any 'play' and the vertical/horizontal axis. If there is then pretty sure it's going to be a bearing and although cheap enough to buy, after looking at a YouTube video actually changing one is a real kerfuffle and as @shutter said, better things to do with my retirement!

Cheers. Thumbs_Up

 

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Re: DIY Dad

We had a bearing failure on an 18 month old machine.

It was repaired under warranty and the engineer swapped out the entire drum assembly.

 

Last week my daughter called to ask if I knew anything about fridges,

Apparently her American style fridge freezer had died.

This DIY Dad went round with his toolbox. I checked the plug fuse first...ok.

Out came the steps and I opened the control panel on top of the unit. There was a small fuse on the large circuit board which tested failed and was removed.

Her partner and I went in search of a supplier, ending up at CEF where we purchased a pack of 10 for £3.

Back at hers we installed the replacement fuse and the fridge freezer burst into life.

We believe the cause of the fuse failure was abuse of the ice-maker by her young daughter.

 

The daughter was disappointed with the outcome as she wanted shut of the large fridge-freezer and replaced with a new one but it cost her nothing originally.

 

Grandads come in handy sometimes.

Customer and Forum Moderator. Windows 10 Firefox 74.0 (64-bit)

Life is tough enough without adding Linux into the mix.
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Anonymous
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Re: DIY Dad

Sons have their advantages too. My youngest bought me an iPhone after I said I was impressed with his new one (6s) and although it's not the newest model, it too is an 6s it's great. I can now use 2 factor authentication on my accounts, see how much money I don't have, log in to things with my finger print and play The Chase Ultimate as well.

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Re: DIY Dad


@Anonymous wrote:

Yep, have to agree with @shutter here @Minivanman life's to short to be up to your elbows in ...

 


I decided many moons ago to go 'upmarket' when looking for a replacement washing machine, being fed up having to carry out repairs on cheaper ones.  I used to buy Hotpoint washers and have had two or three of them but they always seemed to be needing motor brushes, bearings, belts, solenoid valves, suspension dampers etc.  I remember keeping the last Hotpoint alive for about 15 years during which time I replaced the bearing 3 times and the spider once due to the shaft looking pitted where it contacted the seal, as well as the other things mentioned.  For that machine brushes and bearings seemed to last about four years.

So my latest choice, now 19.5 years ago, was a Miele which is still going strong and looks pretty much like new.  During that time the only parts I've needed to replace have been a pair of suspension dampers, cost about £25.

My point being that it's usually false economy buying the cheap brands, and in my case not only have I saved money overall, but I haven't had the inconvenience of having to do all those repairs.

Regarding Miele, yes they cost more, but there are often offers which include a 'free' 10 year parts and labour warranty.

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Re: DIY Dad

@RobPN 

Out of my price range as is even an 'el cheapo' new one for my daughter at the moment, so it's going to be a look on-line for a used one.

Thinking something around the £50 mark which seems about right and one not more than say one or two years old? Most are cold feed machines these days so should be easy enough to find one and I know I'll be able to squeeze it into the back of my old Fiesta - just. I can then of course cart the other one off to the dump.

We had a Bendix front loader years back and it worked fine with zero problems for about eight years at which time the Mrs decided she'd "like to have a one year old top loader my Nan is giving away" so.... Anyway, we passed the Bendix on free to our next-door-but-one neighbour (who had twins plus two toddlers at the time) and the same machine worked away happily for at least five if not more years!  

As for that top loader the Mrs insisted on having however. Knuppel 

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Re: DIY Dad


@Minivanman wrote:

@RobPN 

Out of my price range as is even an 'el cheapo' new one for my daughter at the moment, so it's going to be a look on-line for a used one.

Thinking something around the £50 mark which seems about right and one not more than say one or two years old? Most are cold feed machines these days so should be easy enough to find one and I know I'll be able to squeeze it into the back of my old Fiesta - just. I can then of course cart the other one off to the dump.


@Minivanman 

Fair enough, and also I didn't realise you were having to buy it for her.

I don't know how much they sell for, but I just had a quick look on eBay for used Miele WMs and there seems to be a few with starting prices in your price range, some with 'Best Offer' available on them - always worth putting in a cheeky offer (even if 'Best Offer' isn't stated!).

I guess the trouble with some of those would be the distance you'd have to travel to collect the item, and if the weight of mine is anything to go by it would be a two-person lift to get it in the back of a car.

Probably telling you how to suck eggs, but don't forget to make sure the transit bolts are in place when transporting your replacement washer!  Wink 

 

Edit:  I forgot to say, if a WM has two feeds (hot and cold), in the past I remember getting around that for someone I know who only had a cold supply near the washer by simply splitting the cold supply to two outlets, then connecting the hot and cold inlet pipes both to cold.  The machine would then heat its own water, which although that would make the wash cycle slightly longer, can also be more energy efficient in some circumstances.

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Re: DIY Dad

Ah yes those transit bolts. Have kept mine from our present machine so maybe they will fit if the one I get does not have them although I seem to recall that on some they are sort of non-removable in that you just loosen them off?

Thanks for the reminder though.  Smiley

Will check out that link, but even if a good price the round trip might negate even that. Seem to be a few for sale on fb Marketplace in and around my area here in Carmarthen.