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Compensation Culture and organised visits

Community Veteran
Posts: 38,251
Thanks: 937
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Registered: 15-06-2007

Compensation Culture and organised visits

I know we should feel sorry for the boy in this report as his life has been ruined. http://www.thisiswiltshire.co.uk/news/headlines/display.var.2322667.0.marlborough_man_wins_compensat... but I have to seriously question the fact that a 16 year old got out of his depth on a youth club trip to the seaside and because of that he suffered brain damage for which he was able to claim compensation as it was 85% not his fault.
11 REPLIES
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Re: Compensation Culture and organised visits

I have to agree - a terrible shame that the poor boy has ended up in this situation.
Decisions like this may well impact the sorts of things that future generations can do.
Statistics show that child abductions are at a similar level to the 70's, however most parents seem terrified to let their children roam.
We used to go miles from home for full days exploring as a group of children - something that has undoubtedly taught us many lessons. It seems now that these experiences are to be denied from future generations.
What frames of reference are we imposing on the economy supporters of our future?
pierre_pierre
Grafter
Posts: 19,757
Registered: 30-07-2007

Re: Compensation Culture and organised visits

If you ran a youth club, would you go on organised trips, I used to be a Cub leader, and I definitely wouldnt now. Undecided
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Re: Compensation Culture and organised visits

I wouldn't these days, although my father was a cub leader years ago, and whilst I was in the scouts I often helped him out with various things.
Lots of what we used to do wouldn't pass muster these days, which is a real shame - we had great times!
(And we're only talking about a decade or two ago - how things change)
Moderator
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Re: Compensation Culture and organised visits

While I feel sorry for the victim in such cases I do find the compensation culture disturbing.
It brings to mind this story illustrating the nonsensical extremes to which it can go.
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alanf
Aspiring Pro
Posts: 1,931
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Registered: 17-10-2007

Re: Compensation Culture and organised visits

There was a case in the papers a few years ago where a supermarket in the States was (successfully?) sued because a customer was injured as a result of the actions of an out of control child. It was her own child!
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Re: Compensation Culture and organised visits

What can one say that has not already been said? It's like being in a lunatic asylum - please let me out!
Anyone would think that there is no risk to living instead of the opposite. Does anyone look back and wonder how on earth we were all reared? We actually used to play on the streets and indulge in all manner of other 'high risk' activities like Brownies and Guides.
Eventually kids will have no organized pastimes and clubs because potential leaders will not take the risk - I know that I wouldn't!
There will be only one set of losers - the young ones themselves, sheltered and growing up with no idea of how to cope with life.
Superuser
Superuser
Posts: 2,519
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Registered: 06-04-2007

Re: Compensation Culture and organised visits

Reminds me of something sent to me on facebook the other day
Quote
According to today's regulators and bureaucrats, those of us who were kids in the 1960s, 1970s and early 1980s probably shouldn't have survived, because our baby cots were covered with brightly coloured lead-based paint which was regularly chewed and licked.
We had no childproof lids on medicine bottles or latches on doors or cabinets, and it was fine to play with pans. When we rode our bikes, we wore no helmets, just flip-flops and fluorescent 'spokey dokeys' on our wheels.
As children, we would ride in cars with no seat belts or airbags and riding in the front passenger seat - or the boot - was a treat. We drank water from the garden hose and not from a bottle, and it tasted the same.
We ate chips, bread and butter pudding, and drank fizzy juice with sugar in it, but were never overweight because we were always outside playing. We shared one drink with four friends - from one bottle or can - and no one actually died from it.
We would spend several hours building go-carts out of scraps, then go top speed down the hill, only to find out we'd forgotten the brakes. After running into a patch of stinging nettles a few times, we learned to solve the problem.
We would leave home in the morning and play all day, as long as we were back before dark. No one was able to reach us and no one minded.
We didn't have Playstations or Xboxes - no video games at all. No 99 channels on TV, no videotape films, no surround sound, no mobile phones, no personal computers, no DVDs, no internet chatrooms.
We had friends - we went outside and found them. We played French skipping and rounders, and sometimes that ball really hurt! We fell out of trees, got cut and broke bones, but there were no law suits.
We played Knock Down Ginger and were actually afraid of the owners catching us. We walked to friends' homes. We also, believe it or not, walked to school; we didn't rely on Mummy or Daddy to drive us to school, as it was just round the corner.
We made up games with sticks and tennis balls. We rode bikes in packs of seven and wore our coats by only the hood. The idea of a parent bailing us out if we broke a law was unheard of they actually sided with the law.
This generation has produced some of the best risk-takers, problem-solvers and inventors, ever. The past 50 years have seen an explosion of innovation and new ideas. We had freedom, failure, success and responsibility, and we learned how to deal with it all.
And you're one of them. Congratulations! Pass this on to others who had the luck to grow as real kids, before lawyers and the government regulated our lives for "our own good".
For those of you who aren't old enough, we thought you might like to read about us.

And something else to put a smile on your face...
The majority of students in universities today were born in 1986. The Uptown Girl they know is by Westlife not Billy Joel. They have never heard of Rick Astley, Bananarama, Neneh Cherry or Belinda Carlisle.
For them, there has always been only one Germany and one Vietnam. AIDS has existed since they were born. CDs have existed since they were born. Michael Jackson has always been white. To them, John Travolta has always been round in shape and they can't imagine how this fat guy could ever have been a god of dance.
They believe that Charlie's Angels and Mission Impossible are films from the past ten years. They can never imagine life before computers. They'll never have pretended to be the A-Team, the Dukes of Hazzard or the Famous Five. They can't believe a black and white television ever existed. And they will never understand how we could leave the house without a mobile phone.
Community Veteran
Posts: 38,251
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Registered: 15-06-2007

Re: Compensation Culture and organised visits

I can only agree whole heartedly.
One of our favourite games in cubs and indeed scouts was British Bulldog where the aim was to stop the other boys from getting across the scout hut and the last one to get stopped was the winner - I might add that there was no protective clothing (short trousers as well) and the floor was plain wooden boards.
Going a little further back my earliest experience of cub camp was a few tents in a field beside a stream that was the water source but we did boil it (in theory), the toilets were a trench we dug and filled in at the end of the camp. Cooking was over an open fire and the best breakfast was when we found a field full of mushrooms (in those days we all knew what edible mushrooms looked like as we used to go and look for them in the fields round the village.
Superuser
Superuser
Posts: 2,519
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Registered: 06-04-2007

Re: Compensation Culture and organised visits

We used to play British Bulldog on the gravel card park.  It was great fun  Crazy
Phil
jmd
Grafter
Posts: 2,933
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Registered: 30-07-2007

Re: Compensation Culture and organised visits

Children now are denied the delights of roaming round local meadows as we did playing and also learning about wildlife, paddling in streams, playing in the street and just generally being children!  They are escorted to and from school, they sit in front of computer/tv/game, go shopping with parents and get shouted at when misbehave - none of that teaches them what we learnt years ago out of school.  I am not surprised that schools/organisations do not want the responsibility of organised trips out with all the attendant dangers that were never thought about years ago. Sad
Midnight_Caller
Rising Star
Posts: 4,143
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Registered: 15-04-2007

Re: Compensation Culture and organised visits

Hi All
Wen I was at school, started school in the 1960's finished school 1970's, we would Experiment with kemikals that are now band, plus we would do Experiments with out supervision, what is a no, no today, back in 1976 what was the hottest  yere on record, we used the schools Fire Hose to cool us down with, what is a no, no today that old favourite of schools Health and Safety, schools to day use Health and Safety to say no with all the time.  Cry