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Chilly today aint it?

Minivanman
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Re: Chilly today aint it?

Parky?

I've researched this meticulously and it originates in late Victorian times when sleeping outdoors was akin to being cold or perky. However, I've just looked up "perky" in Chambers and it means "self-confident" so I realise now, that I'm talking a load of testicles. 

St3
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Re: Chilly today aint it?

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Re: Chilly today aint it?

That article is a bit over the top as usual, we can get frost up to the end of May in Lancashire and I guess even later than that for some parts of Scotland.

Elderly people, particularly those with existing medical conditions are very vulnerable so it comes as no surprise the number of deaths at this time of the year is higher and with the increasing number of elderly people it follows the number of deaths will increase year on year.

 

Jonpe
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Re: Chilly today aint it?

The OED's earliest reference to parky meaning cold is from the sporting press in 1895.  The spelling was parkey which by 1898 had become parky.

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Re: Chilly today aint it?

As opposed to Parkie meaning a Park Keeper.....do they still exist Undecided

'Keep off the grass' and all that stuff.

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Re: Chilly today aint it?


@St3 wrote:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4171118/Killer-cold-minus-10C-forecast-freezing-February.htm...


So, if -10° Celsius is a "Killer", how do Canucks living in -40° weather survive? Crazy2

 

And their reporting of an increased number of deaths? It's 72 years since the end of WWII, when a lot of soldiers came home to their wives and "had fun", and ended up creating a lot of children, and a lot of those children are dying off now due to old age, not just because it's winter, hell, it's been a pretty mild winter so far, so their last "BIG FREEZE OF DOOM IS NIGH!!" wails were utter rubbish, as they always are... Roll eyes

 

Idiots, the lot of 'em...


Jonpe
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Re: Chilly today aint it?

@Strat The OED gives parky without a final e meaning park-keeper, mainly used in Scotland.

@twocvbloke Yes, temperatures below about 5C are regularly described by the media as Arctic, and anything above about 27C as tropical.  So it's going to be cold in February?  February is statistically the coldest month in the UK so not really a forecast.  When meteorologists can predict rain accurately 24 hours in advance, I'll believe their prediction two weeks in advance that it will be unusually cold in mid-February.

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Re: Chilly today aint it?


@Jonpe wrote:

@Strat The OED gives parky without a final e meaning park-keeper, mainly used in Scotland.

I never wrote it down so really hadn't a clue how it was spelt. It was just a guess.

I do have a small quantity of Scottish blood in me.


 

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Minivanman
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Re: Chilly today aint it?

@twocvbloke

Blimey, are we allowed to say "Canucks" Smiley

Anyways, I would suggest that minus ten is as much as a killer as minus forty. Just a case of a thicker coat I'm guessing but yes, those Canadians must be laughing up their sleeves. I had an uncle from Nova Scotia (a lumberjack would you belive) - he was one of those soldiers 'having fun' over here during world war two. Still in touch with a couple of my cousins over there and they often comment about how we complain about how cold it is here at times. No end to their amusement of course. 

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Re: Chilly today aint it?


@Minivanman wrote:
(a lumberjack would you belive)

 

But, was he okay? Slept all night and worked all day? Funny

 

As for saying Canucks, well, yeah, that's the short name for them, like we're Brits, but that aside, I've a few acquaintances over there, often laughing at the way I poke fun at us brits and how we fail to cope with winters that consist of a few inches of snow closing down everything, all the while they're freezing their whatsits off under a few feet of snow and just getting on with life... Funny

 

I do know one who is jealous of out lack of snow, cos he likes motorbiking, and in the winter he can't cos he doesn't like the snow... Grin

Jonpe
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Re: Chilly today aint it?

See my message #22 above:  I checked the forecast on the BBC at about 6:15 a.m. and no rain was forecast for my area, at 8 a.m. it was raining.

@Minivanman  A Canadian I chat to online from time to time describes himself as a Canuck, and according to Wikipedia it is "an affectionate or merely descriptive term for their nationality. It is not considered derogatory in Canada".

@twocvbloke  Short names are not always acceptable e.g. the short version of Pakistani.

 

Minivanman
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Re: Chilly today aint it?

Not amongst themselves maybe @Jonpe and a bit like the Irish referring to themselves as Paddy, the Scots with Jock and here in Wales where they use the term Taffy - especially and more correctly in Cardiff. But let an 'outsider' use the expression then the hackles go up.

You can check with your friend in Canada but I think the term Canuck is more to do with French Canadians - but I may be wrong on that score.

A touchy subject if you get it wrong and I did have somebody here on this forum objecting about a joke I posted which I had received from an Irish friend where they were calling themselves Paddy. 

Just cannot win these days but, maybe it's all about intent. Sad

As a slight aside, I sat and watched the 1955 film 'The Dambusters' a few afternoon's ago and was surprised that the now infamous N word for Guy Gibson's dog had not been dubbed over.

Jonpe
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Re: Chilly today aint it?

My 'chat mate' is indeed French Canadian with a bit of 'native Canadian' thrown in, but Wikipedia doesn't say that the word only applies to French Canadians.

Yes, groups sometimes use words amongs themselves which would be considered offensive if used by outsiders, e.g. the N-word.

The most hilarious Irish jokes I've ever heard were told by an Irish woman I worked with.

Re. Dambusters:  I hope you were suitably offended and have started proceedings to get compensation from the broadcasting organisation concerned.

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Re: Chilly today aint it?


@Jonpe wrote:
@twocvbloke  Short names are not always acceptable e.g. the short version of Pakistani.

 


Oh I know that, but, having interacted enough with canucks, I'm pretty much allowed to, they never complained... Grin

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Re: Chilly today aint it?


@Minivanman wrote:

 

As a slight aside, I sat and watched the 1955 film 'The Dambusters' a few afternoon's ago and was surprised that the now infamous N word for Guy Gibson's dog had not been dubbed over.


It was a film of the time and I hope they never edit out such stuff as it would be like re-writing history.

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