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Charity: The new big business.

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Charity: The new big business.

Yup, I've said it several times but its proven today by the trusty old daily mail!
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3357458/One-five-UK-s-biggest-charities-spending-half-public...
Take a look at the worst offender - over £1bn income... and just £14m paid out on actual charitable causes.
Any guesses as to what the rest of that is spent on? (Here's a hint - the top end of management).
I guess those who claim millionaires do a lot for charity should think twice before pulling that line again. Even some of the well known charities are in there - from cancer to age related.
I am not shocked though... not one little bit - why? Because it seems every other person in this country is up to no good in one way or another while the honest folk remain at the bottom.
I need a new signature... i'm bored of the old one!
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Re: Charity: The new big business.

Actually that is a really bad example
Quote
When approached by the newspaper, a Lloyd's spokesman said the LRF is not a publicly funded charity, but is instead, funded 'by the profits from its trading entity, Lloyd’s Register Group Ltd.'
'The confusion comes from accounting requirements which require us to list the total turnover of the trading group (Lloyd’s Register Group Ltd) as ‘income’ – whereas in reality the Foundation’s income comes from the trading group gift-aiding a proportion of its profits and from investments,' he said. 
Actually the one which surprised me was Guide Dogs for the Blind who I always thought ran a fairly tight ship
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Re: Charity: The new big business.

First thing that came to mind for Lloyds was tax evasion....
I need a new signature... i'm bored of the old one!
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Re: Charity: The new big business.

Lloyds Register is a non-profit ship engineering/safety organisation governed by a committee of representatives from the industry. Lloyds the insurance organisation is totally separate thouthe HQs of each organisation are at the opposite ends of Fenchurch St in London.
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Re: Charity: The new big business.

It always annoys/amazes me that people fall for the "celebrity" fund raisers. If they were to ONLY give 5% of THEIR income to the charity then MILLIONS of ordinary people wouldn't have to. But instead they ask YOU to pay "just £nn a month".
I NEVER give to any large charity, I may buy something in the shop but that is it. I do donate to PDSA/local animal shelters but only goods NOT cash as I don't have enough to give any away.
peter10
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Re: Charity: The new big business.

Once I donated to charity via text. It was a mistake as bombarded with calls from a call centre for several weeks. Moved energy supplier to First Utility and kept being called by the NSPCC which I found out they supported. A lot of these charities are good causes but I will never sign up to anything via a cold call. I dislike being stopped in supermarkets asking to give money. I will give to some which I choose but had a row with a person from a local dogs home who could not understand what no meant. I don't particularly like dogs and so I didn't want to donate. I do donate to charities such as Save the Children and NSPCC but will never give any personal details to save myself from the incessant phone calls.
Luzern
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Re: Charity: The new big business.

I've looked at some of the examples, noticing one matter in particular, namely that the accounts are consolidated group accounts, defined as.
Quote
Consolidated financial statements combine the financial statements of separate legal entities controlled by a parent company into one set of financial statements for the entire group of companies.
. That means they can be wholly misleading. In the case of Consumers Association the situation is this. The charitable work is funded by the post tax profit from Which? activities.
A not always minor problem are Restricted Funds, that were set up for particular purposes, sometimes set up a time ago. They may have considerable assets and income, yet their purpose is past, but the money cannot be used. It can need an Act of Parliament to rescind the restriction.
In short, things are not as simple as some, either through ignorance, or a drum to beat would like us to believe.
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Re: Charity: The new big business.

I usually make a small contribution to Children in Need but that's about it.
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nanotm
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Re: Charity: The new big business.

several years ago the NSPCC and Oxfam were outed as giving less than 1p from donations to the charitable causes with the remainder being swallowed in "admin costs"  and some CEO of a charity was defending the multi million pound salary and compensation package being paid by some of the charities as required for al lthe hard work the nominated recipients did, to me the whole point of a charity is that you get a reasonable wage from a full time job, not a commensurate income comparible with any other large business leader (so 100k a year would be just about acceptable in my view, you don't run a charity to get rich you run it because you belive in the cause but need ot survive at the same time)
the only charities I give to are mountain rescue, RBL, RNLI and a couple of local ones, I stopped agreeing with the aims of several of the larger charities a long time ago when they started telling us how to live and ramming ever more "pc nonsence" down our throats/
just because your paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get you
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Re: Charity: The new big business.

Major charities usually say something along the lines of "running a large charity needs skilled, experienced people and to get these people we need to offer good salaries and conditions"
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nanotm
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Re: Charity: The new big business.

Yeah they do say it but that doesn't mean it's true, you get the best results when your staff believe in the cause and if you can no longer find people it's a good indicator you need a review not a good excuse to let pay packages start spiralling
just because your paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get you
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Re: Charity: The new big business.

Me personally I'll give to an animal charity (the smaller ones) but not the RSPCA or PDSA. They both do valuable work but they both operate like big business. I once went to the HQ of the RSPCA in West Sussex. I kid you not it was one of the most expensive looking office blocks you could ever see. It was quite clear what was happening with those donations. PDSA are the same, they've closed down many of their free veterinary centres over the years.
I'm also skeptical about a certain cancer charity that advertises on TV frequently (actually there are two of them). It can cost hundreds of thousands to advertise on TV... where is that money coming from? - Who is producing such professional looking adverts and how much do they also cost?
Then there are the beggers in the street asking you to fill in the direct debit form....so they can get paid commission...
Sorry I know it sounds mean but i have lost my sympathy for these charities. Yes I do have supportive feelings for the causes (EG the real people affected) but not the charities that claim to support them. As for the smaller animal charities, animals are powerless to look after themselves against the acts of humanity. They are the victims of our actions and thus they do need genuine support.
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Re: Charity: The new big business.

Put simply; many charities have broken the social contract with the public and are no longer fit for purpose.
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MightyMouse
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Re: Charity: The new big business.

A while back I gave a donation  to Macmillan (of which I believe do a lot of good work). From then on  they sent me draw tickets to buy just about every month. I asked them to stop, telling them I could not afford as a pensioner to purchase every  month, and that I was leaving them money in my will anyway.
Should not charities be made to supply an account of how their money is spent ?
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Re: Charity: The new big business.

WRT the PDSA I support them only because they support my dog. I get "free" vet assistance using their certificate (which costs me a £7.50 Postal Order every 6 months which means £8.50) but for that he gets free treatment at the local vets including tablets.  (You can only get these if you are on a low income, etc) I still have to pay for the yearly "boosters" (another £30) which I feel are just a rip off, there is plenty of evidence that once a dog has the first 2 years worth then they DON'T need any more.