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Change of Surname

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Change of Surname

Interesting article on the bbc news website regarding the problems and reactions of relatives when a man wants to change his surname to his wife's surname.

In one instance even an employer had some issues with it.

What would your reaction be if a close family relative wished to do the same thing ?

Why do some people see the importance of keeping a surname throughout the generations ? Is it important ?

Any opinions ?

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Re: Change of Surname

Men can and do change their surnames can't they?

When a couple get married, they can choose to both have their surnames changed but hyphenated.

Someone I used to work with did that.

Pete11
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Re: Change of Surname

Personally, I can't see why a person should change their surname, unless they've done something a bit 'dodgy' and want to throw anyone off track for a while (bailiff, tax-man etc.). There are some though that seems to think that a change of name is a change in fortune but I can't see it somehow. 2 years ago a chap was arrested very close to where I live, turned out he was on the run from custody. He'd changed his surname by deed-poll but was still caught after being on the run for just over 3 years. Would I change mine? No, can't see the point.

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Re: Change of Surname

Yes and in this day and age, you'd think they'd have records of your original surname (whether paper or a database).

So making a change will make no difference, you could still be identified by your original surname I would have thought.

Champnet
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Re: Change of Surname

I can understand a Woman hyphenating her husband's Surname name to preserve her Maiden name, but as for a Male changing his Surname I agree with @Pete11 it does look dodgy.

 

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Re: Change of Surname

I've known people (a male) to change their surname so it is a combination of his wife's surname (hyphen) then his.

He got divorced, so I was wondering why he had two separate surnames. For example when he made personal calls at work. One was a hyphened one of his ex-wife's name and one was his current one.

I personally don't see how a male changing their surname is any less dodgy than a female.

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Re: Change of Surname

Not to mention the fact that some name combinations just don't go when hyphenated, for example :- Mr. & Mrs. Hugh-Janus

Equally, the woman may not want to take on her spouse's surname because she doesn't want to be known as Mrs. Tickelbum.

 

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Re: Change of Surname

Yes funny you should say that @Mook

I made a joke on Facebook, as my surname is Hunt, that I am glad my parents didn't name me Michael.

I will have to let people to work that one out, as I will get told off. Tongue  

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Re: Change of Surname

Funnily enough,

Here is an interesting BBC article of a male who did it, and the problems it caused. 

I just spotted it on BBC News today of course.

EDIT: @gleneagles beat me to it, I didn't look at BBC News earlier today, but can see the reason for the original post.

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Re: Change of Surname

Interesting link, @Alex.

 

When I married my first wife she was a widow with two children. SHe had kept her married name but changed it to mine once married but her girls kept their surname. When we had our own child she took my surname but it was never an issue for anyone.

 

When we divorced my ex-wife changed hers to her maiden name.

 

As an aside in the first article in the above link the man said 'his boss insists on using my maiden name instead'. I thought maiden name only referred to femails. Surely it would be called 'bachelor name'?

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Re: Change of Surname

I always thought that Maiden = first. So the name you were born with. Irrelevant of your gender? 

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Re: Change of Surname

Personally I don't particularly see why someone (or shall we say a man) should face opposition to changing his surname. Women frequently do when getting married, why can't a man?

I must admit i don't particularly like my surname. I inherited it from a parent who has never cared for me, never sent me so much as a birthday card, never called me for a catch up and only ever met me twice in my life. Why on earth should I carry that surname? for me it is nothing but a reminder of how rotten my family is. It is also a common sounding name.

If I were to change my surname to that of my other parents family.. same thing. My grandparents are gone, they weren't exactly perfect, the others do not stay in touch either...

It's also a common-ish name and frankly wouldn't really match my first name.

Now I have thought about changing it on several occasions but according to some of you here i'd then look dodgy / sinister for doing so and thus I am stuck with what I have -  name i do not particularly like, has never done me any favours, is nothing but a reminder of badness and makes me feel worthless.

So why should I not be allowed that same privilege to change my name to something nicer that i prefer the sound of?

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Superuser
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Re: Change of Surname

I know 2 men who changed their surnames when getting married, and I don't think either had any issues.  The first one took his wifes surname.  His previous surname wasn't the nicest of names, though I never thought of it like that until he changed it.

The second, both him and his wife changed their surnames to be a hyphenated version of both of their maiden names.

Jonpe
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Re: Change of Surname

A few men take their wife's surname if their own is a bit 'common', like Smith for instance, or use both surnames hyphenated.

Some women who are well-known in the professions keep their original surname after marriage, others use their husband's surname in informal private situations, e.g. a woman might remain professor Jones, but in private social situations she might be Mrs Smith if that is her husbands surname.

Many Continental Jewish immigrants during the war changed, anglicised, or translated their surnames, probably partly to make them easier to spell and pronounce, and partly because being German, or being seen as such, was not exactly popular.

I don't think changing your name is going to fool the authorities, at least not HMRC, since your NI number remains the same.

They royals, as has been mentioned, are rather prolific name-changers having changed their family name from Saxe-Coburg and Gotha to Windsor, and Prince Philip taking the name Mountbatten (an anglicised version of the original Battenberg) from his mother's side of the family.

TV personality Rylan Clark added his husband's surname to his own to become Rylan Clark-Neal, and his husband (Daniel Neal) chose to keep the two surnames in the same order.

I'm not sure whether maiden name can apply to a man; perhaps it's time to change it to something gender-neutral such as original name.  For registry office purposes I believe the definition of maiden name is the name a woman had before her first marriage.  This would therefore differ from née (her original name) since she may have changed it between birth and first marriage.  Indeed, until fairly recently adopted women did not have a legal right to know their original surname.

Now spare a thought for this poor fellow and his 666 letter surname https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hubert_Blaine_Wolfeschlegelsteinhausenbergerdorff,_Sr.

 

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Re: Change of Surname


@Jonpe wrote:

 

I don't think changing your name is going to fool the authorities, at least not HMRC, since your NI number remains the same. 


I once worked for the government, finding anybody you needed to find was easy back then! Fast foward many years and with all the various databases the state has access to, finding someone is a triviality.

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