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Car Tax

Community Veteran
Posts: 7,906
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Registered: 02-08-2007

Car Tax

For the past 3 years I have been driving a Ford Focus Diesel (first reg 2002) and the Annual road Tax was £120.
Last week I changed this for a Honda CR-V (first Reg 2004) and nearly fell of my chair when told the road tax for this vehicle was £280 for the year.
I assume this has something to do with the amount of carbon emissions but what I don't understand is why a Japanese car would have such high emissions as I always thought that the Japanese were very strict when it came to car emissions.
Has anyone got any thoughts on this ?
20 REPLIES
David_W
Rising Star
Posts: 2,293
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Registered: 19-07-2007

Re: Car Tax

I'd say check here so you can find the full info on your new car.  There are quite a few different types of CV-R's out there but it'll at least give you more information.
Community Veteran
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Re: Car Tax

The Carbon tax element of road tax is distinctly unfair as it taxes the potential to produce carbon dioxide rather than actual production of CO2. In other words the actual mileage driven and fuel consumed.
I can understand the idea of trying to push people to get rid of older less efficient cars but even that is not exactly logical. If I swapped my low mileage P reg MPV for a small fuel efficient car it would take 7 years of driving before there would be a break even on the additional CO2 generated in manufacturing the new car.
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Community Veteran
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Registered: 08-01-2008

Re: Car Tax

Quote from: AlaricAdair
The Carbon tax element of road tax is distinctly unfair

In reality the whole idea of road tax (Road Fund License) is unfair as you pay the same amount for a given vehicle regardless of mileage, charging less for more environmentally friendly vehicles is not really so unfair, it is always a good idea to encourage lower emissions in any way.  Until recently low energy lightbulbs were similarly subsidised to encourage their use in preference to incandescent lights.  Even people who drive a low annual mileage should have some incentive to buy a more efficient vehicle, at some point it will likely be sold on and the more people who choose low emmissions vehicles from new the better in the long run.
The tax on fuel far outweighs the price of the tax disc for anyone doing high mileage so for most the lower road tax is only a small incentive but still useful in the battle against CO2 emmissions.  At one time the GLC was going to exempt 'Band A' emmissions vehicles from the congestion charge, in my opinion it is a pity this was dropped (not that I actually want to drive my Pole Bluemotion in central London)
Call me 'w23'
At any given moment in the universe many things happen. Coincidence is a matter of how close these events are in space, time and relationship.
Opinions expressed in forum posts are those of the poster, others may have different views.
Community Veteran
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Registered: 01-08-2007

Re: Car Tax

I still don't understand why they don't just add road tax into the cost of fuel and have done with it once and for all.
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itsme
Grafter
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Registered: 07-04-2007

Re: Car Tax

Perhaps the UK should limit the number of cars on the road in the same manner as Singapore does with the Certificate of Entitlement http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Certificate_of_Entitlement. The  certificate cost more than the car in most cases.
gswindale
Grafter
Posts: 942
Registered: 05-04-2007

Re: Car Tax

However is Singapore not a City-state?  Therefore it is much easier to get around than in the UK.
If I lived in a major city with decent public transport (London/Brum/Mankychester etc) then I would have no need for a car.  However I live somewhere where public transport makes it extremely awkward for getting to work etc.  Thus I require a car.
community
Grafter
Posts: 666
Registered: 31-07-2007

Re: Car Tax

I  didn't know about the Singapore C of E (sounds like a certain religion I know!) but I do remember that when I was travelling the world more than at present, there was  ruling in some South American countries that  the entitlement just to use the roads was shared (and possibly halved) by allowing only even numbered vehicles on alternate days with odd numbered cars..
Of course the welloff guys had 2 cars with separate numbers!
Community Veteran
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Registered: 02-02-2008

Re: Car Tax

Quote from: walker23
The tax on fuel far outweighs the price of the tax disc for anyone doing high mileage so for most the lower road tax is only a small incentive

I think one big difference is psychological.
When people are buying a car (OP excepted!  Shocked ) the road tax is often a factor they consider, apparently much more so than MPG/fuel duty.
I guess the reason is that one is something you have to pay regardless of mileage.
Community Veteran
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Registered: 21-03-2011

Re: Car Tax

So someone who drives 20,000 miles a year with a small car should pay less carbon tax than someone who drives 3000 miles a year in a larger engined car?  It would be far more efficient the carbon tax was wholly loaded on to the price of fuel. It is almost impossible to evade a tax and would represent taxation on the basis of pollution caused. The only reason this has not been done before is because politicians worry about the votes of the people living in the countryside and work on the basis that the yokels should be subsidised by the people living in towns and cities, thus we see a vehicle excise duty priced on a fixed amount regardless of the mileage charged. The carbon tax element of the Vehicle Excise duty is essentially an Envy Tax.
The annual/six monthly renewal of road tax provides a point where an official can check the vehicle is insured and tested. It is not wholly efficient as at least 10% of vehicles are not properly licensed (depending on which part of the country you reside). An additional check should be introduced whereby number plate recognition is installed at petrol stations, leading to no fuel unless the vehicle is licensed and insured. That would also stop the people from eastern Europe who's vehicle exceeds the 12 months allowed before UK registration.
Now Zen, but a +Net residue.
Community Veteran
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Registered: 01-08-2007

Re: Car Tax

I personally think they should just whack another 4p on each litre and abolish road tax once and for all. No more lost SORNs, no more lost tax discs, no more arguements with the incompetent DVLA etc.
Those who do the most mileage pay the most tax. Thats fair is it not? Those who do the least pay the least.
While I accept that those buying a new car take the road tax into consideration, that shouldn't be the entire arguement for buying a car. Don't forget if tax is added onto the fuel and you buy a car with a bigger engine its going to cost you more than a smaller car anyway just as it does now. We all know that.
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Community Veteran
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Registered: 08-01-2008

Re: Car Tax

Abolishing road tax removes an important function of checking insurance and (where applicable) MOT status annually.
I'm all for all the 'carbon tax' being on fuel but we still need a proper system to reduce uninsured, unsafe vehicles on the roads.  If all the tax was put on fuel then I'd expect some increase in pikeys and the like using 'red diesel' (and some of the aformentioned yokels using 'traactor fyool') in their cars.
Number plate recognition is all very well as long as number plates cannot be forged or switched (hardly likely), and possibly even more incentive for those of such inclination to used non-excised fuel.
Call me 'w23'
At any given moment in the universe many things happen. Coincidence is a matter of how close these events are in space, time and relationship.
Opinions expressed in forum posts are those of the poster, others may have different views.
Community Veteran
Posts: 13,920
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Fixes: 7
Registered: 01-08-2007

Re: Car Tax

Quote from: walker23
Abolishing road tax removes an important function of checking insurance and (where applicable) MOT status annually.

I guess you didn't see watchdog the other night then. The DVLA are already struggling to handle road tax and sorn declarations so removing that from them would make their job easier and they could then genuinely concentrate on uninsured vehicles and MOT expiry.
I need a new signature... i'm bored of the old one!
itsme
Grafter
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Registered: 07-04-2007

Re: Car Tax

Quote from: AlaricAdair
That would also stop the people from eastern Europe who's vehicle exceeds the 12 months allowed before UK registration.

I thought it was 6 months.
I was working with some Poles a few years ago and I thought they were breaking the law as they were driving on Polish plates and no tax. Then one was pulled over, a few hours after I warned him that the local police were having a clampdown, and the outcome was his car was impounded because of his insurance. There was no reason for him to register his car in the UK and therefore pay road tax as his main address was still in Poland. But he did have difficulty finding an insurance company to cover his car. At the time there seemed to be only one insurance company that would offer him cover. 
Community Veteran
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Re: Car Tax

Whenever I am "out and about".... I like to find roads that I have never been on before,      even if they are "dead end" roads in the middle of nowhere...      Roll eyes  . and also I try to drive into all the laybys that have been made when a road has been straightened...    . this is to ensure that I get value for money from my road tax....  Cheesy after all, I have paid to use them.... so why not !  Grin