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Calling DIY'ers

Minivanman
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Calling DIY'ers

I'm about to lay some composite cork flooring in our bathroom onto an existing slate floor. It can be quite cold in there because of the slate, so would I be wise to lay some sort of insulation foil between that and the cork floor? The link here by the ways does say some of their flooring range is suitable for bathrooms.

Cheers as always guys Thumbs Up

http://www.corkfloor.co.uk/

 

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Re: Calling DIY'ers

@Minivanman - What about lifting the slate floor and laying this or similar underneath instead. Shame to hide a nice slate floor.

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Re: Calling DIY'ers

Laying the cork on top of the slate.... well that will certainly make the floor "feel" warmer..... or the other way round... less cold !... depending on the thickness of the cork... obviously, the more "insulation" you can put beneath the cork, the less cold the floor will be... what will be your "working/walking" surface finsh ?

You will have to take into consideration how the "thickness" of the flooring you are intending to lay, affects/fits around/under the existing fixtures and fittings..

Minivanman
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Re: Calling DIY'ers

Well it's a rather old cottage I have not so much slate tiles. rather large and a little uneven slate slabs the size and thickness of headstones, so they'll have to stay in situ - hate to lift em' and find RIP Auntie Nellie 1855 carved on the other side!

Like the underfloor heating though @Mook, never seen that before. 

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Minivanman
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Re: Calling DIY'ers

I think it will be warmer @shutter as those slates slabs really are like ice to walk on (we have a small rug over them at the moment). Area wise it's only about two square metres so rather small and yes, those existing fixtures and fitting as it's not going to be easy trimming the cork to go around the sink and toilet. Thank heavens there is not a bidet in there as well eh? Wink

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MKSlinky
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Re: Calling DIY'ers

I've had previous experience of this myself and laying any kind of underlay under cork is not very effective as it causes a lifting effect, i.e. the cork won't lay completely flat. Generally speaking the cork needs to be glued down. You might get away with it if the cork is a centimetre or more in thickness but generally cork floor tiles are only a couple of MM at best and believe me that doesn't address the cold floor issue.  How much is your budget and have you considered alternatives? There's some really nice textured cushioned vinyls these days which look exactly like wood laminate or even stone tiles and these offer much better insulating properties. Prices vary from around £15-£20 per/sq metre. 

I've recently had this product (Karndean) laid in my bathroom and hallway and it's really very good. The fitters come the day before and apply a self levelling compound to your floor which dries like a layer of hardboard which then doubles as an underlay. This is particularly good on uneven floors and the finished product is every bit as good as real tiles. It wears extremely well too unlike normal cushioned vinyl.

The Karndean Knight tile product which I chose comes in a variety of styles from wood laminates, stone tiles, mosaics and so on and is priced very reasonably at around £15 - £20 per 3 /sq metres. Obviously fitting is extra but you can buy this product and do it yourself. Personally I chose fitting, they do a marvellous job at cutting around the toilet pedestal. They heat the tiles with a special heat gun which softens it first.

Each plank is 36" x 4"

Here's the one I chose, it's really lovely.

KP68-Shannon-Oak_OH.jpg

KP68_Shannon-Oak_RS_Res_Conservatory_Image.jpg

 

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Re: Calling DIY'ers


Minivanman wrote:

Thank heavens there is not a bidet in there as well eh? Wink


What no bidet! Well I suppose we maybe had sinks before we had bidets. Wink

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Re: Calling DIY'ers

We've used "no more ply" under tiles over both wood and concrete subfloor - it is waterproof and doesn't rot like plywood in a bathroom environment.

If you do consider any form of underfloor heating make sure you have a good layer of insulation underneath or you'll be wasting money on heating. 

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Re: Calling DIY'ers

@Minivanman

Sounds a similar setup to our bathroom except our tiles are about 1sqft each with a total floor area of around 60sqft (5.5sqm). We do have a bidet - used for storing clothes in soak before being put into the washing machineCheesy

 

We, too, have a rug on the floor as the tiles are so cold this time of year. Hadn't thought about doing what you're doing but as it's a rented property not sure it's worth it.

 

 

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MKSlinky
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Re: Calling DIY'ers

What...! You don't make cider in your bidet? What a waste!!

Moderator's note by Mike (Mav): Full quote of preceding post removed as per Forum rules.

Thanks for the PM Mike, sorry I quoted you in full, I'm blaming the quote button for doing that. Undecided

Reminder to myself: Read the rule book!! 

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Re: Calling DIY'ers

No but we got a 'bleeding lizard' in thereWink

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MKSlinky
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Re: Calling DIY'ers

Seriously speaking though.., I'm not for one minute saying don't use cork, done right it can look really nice but like many floors it does have limitations. For a start it needs to be sealed well to prevent water staining. Likewise wear & tear can be a problem particularly in doorways and any areas where you use regularly. Around the toilet pedestal was an issue for me as however carefully you might aim you'll always get some splashing even from just flushing the toilet. Likewise chemical cleaners can have a disastrous effect if splashed on the floor as can rubber backed bath mats which often stain flooring.

 

I never took any photos of my cork floor before removal but it resembled this image below albeit not quite so bad and I live alone and take great care with my property.

 

CORK.jpg

MKSlinky
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Re: Calling DIY'ers


Mav wrote:

No but we got a 'bleeding lizard' in thereWink


Poor thing..! Did you take it to a vet? Cry

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Re: Calling DIY'ers


MKSlinky wrote:

Full quote removed? What full quote? I think you edited the wrong one Mike! Huh


@MKSlinky

I have replied to your PM.

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Minivanman
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Re: Calling DIY'ers

@MKSlinky

I know what you mean about thickness of these tiles. These are a three ply composite with cork top and bottom and around half inch thick so quite sturdy. They also 'click' together so should lay quite well on any thermal underlay although I may have to skim those slate slabs slightly where they have tipped a bit - not surprising as they must have been down for a couple of hundred years at a guess.

Thanks for your all your advice guys, much appreciated. 

All views expressed are my own but you can express them too if you want to be right about everything like I am.