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Bridge to Nowhere

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Hero
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Bridge to Nowhere

I "admire" the future generosity of promises made by government and opposition to us all as our Christmas presents.

However an article in yesterday's Telegraph business pages, via Pressreader, has four ex-Chancellors highly critical of Tory spending plans; Lamont, Hammond, Osborne and Darling. The article explains why.

Do they, and even worse Labour, promise too much? you will decide. Manifestos seem panglossian to me.

Central Banks have been buying in gold for some time, causing prices to rise.  The suggestion is that  the rise reflects the view that currencies are/ are to depreciate. IM worthless O. For the World Rocky Roads could be ahead, of the pleasant type NOT.

Turning a bit OT.

Has anyone been watching Simon Reeve on the Americas? The show about California and Los Angeles made me move much further from wishing to emulate USA;  a very high rate of homeless in terrible conditions e.g.  living within a bridge, entered climbing throuh an inspection cover, four street medics for LA, infrastructure like dams, built in 30s 40s in need of serious repair. USA, no thanks.

No one has to agree with my opinion, but in the time I have left a miracle would be nice.
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Community Veteran
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Re: Bridge to Nowhere

These promises are fine but when are many of them likely to be implemented ?

In some cases any changes will come out of existing budgets and some other things will be low on the priority list and held over to the next election due to time running out.

I share your concerns about the homeless, not many votes there and it's votes all the parties are concentrating on.

The elderly in general do not do too bad, there are of course exceptions but when compared to many other groups they do ok.

Once the election is over I understand the 'triple lock' is due to be reviewed and likely scrapped.....will savings here be one way the government gets some money for other projects ?

I recall someone saying if you want to see what society will be like in the future here then look at America today....we seem to be following what goes on there, knives here instead of guns, rapid increase on those on drugs,, higher number of people in prison and public services starved of money getting worse by the day.

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Aspiring Legend
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Re: Bridge to Nowhere

@gleneagles 

Industry experts at least under Theresa May were certainly pushing for a review but I have read nothing about it being scrapped entirely. What was suggested was that the 2.5% be removed as it made no sense because it was tied to a figure that might be less than inflation - or have I got that wrong. Double lock instead of triple? Maybe.

First they came for our bus pass, then the free TV licence, then the winter fuel allowance, raised the age of retirement, the £10 Christmas (whoopee) bonus and now, they are after our pension protection.

Beware the elderly vote that's all can say as there are a lot of us and unlike 'generation x' and the moaning millennial, we are far more inclined to use it. 😈


Compare yourself to who you were yesterday, not who somebody else is today
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Re: Bridge to Nowhere

@Minivanman 

Once they have got your vote they can do anything they like over the next 5 years and just near the end of that 5 years start offering all the goodies again.....

Triple lock......yes you are right it is coming up for review in 2020 .....I accept there is nothing about scrapping it but equally saying nothing about it can tell you a lot.

Just my cynical self expressing a view of what I think is likely to happen.

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Re: Bridge to Nowhere


@Luzern wrote: Central Banks have been buying in gold for some time, causing prices to rise.  The suggestion is that  the rise reflects the view that currencies are/ are to depreciate. IM worthless O. For the World Rocky Roads could be ahead, of the pleasant type NOT.

It isn't just Central Banks buying gold. I (and some people I know at work) bought some late last year. Even on the modest amount I bought, if I was to sell it now, I'd be looking at far more of a return than I'd have got in a bank account i.e. about 30%. No wonder Banks can give us all such paltry interest rates. Yes, you can get 5% or so but it seems to be an endless game of shopping around for the best deal.

 

But it seems its an Asian thing to own Gold. They buy the real stuff (frequently 24K) to actually hold, not get a paper certificate that might be real or not! Maybe China's influence is affecting the Gold market.

 

As to the homeless etc we have our fair share already. No need to go the USA. Worryingly a fair number tend to talk to people in a foreign language. So much for having a job to go to etc. Or maybe they do double shifts i.e. work at night and beg during the day.

Ever helpful. Grin Sure, I’d love to help you out. Now which way did you come in?
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Re: Bridge to Nowhere

Every big city collects its fair share of down and outs and drop-outs looking for a better life,  the people in the rural areas can be just as poor but they make the best of what they have rather than looking for handouts in the big cities.  The divide between rich and poor in USA is pretty stark,  but there are millions of people from all over the world  who risk everything to get in there, legally or otherwise.  

 

If you shared all the wealth in the world out equally you can bet that within a few years most of the same people would be rich,  and most of the same ones would be poor,  it is a fact of life... some people want to work and some want the same things without working...

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Re: Bridge to Nowhere


@Minivanman wrote:

@gleneagles 

...

First they came for our bus pass, then the free TV licence, then the winter fuel allowance, raised the age of retirement, the £10 Christmas (whoopee) bonus and now, they are after our pension protection.


Had a quick check and pensioners will still get their £10, their winter fuel allowance and their bus passes.

Hope the £10 doesn't bias the election outcome. 👿

"In The Beginning Was The Word, And The Word Was Aardvark."

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Re: Bridge to Nowhere

@VileReynard 

Indeed we do and 'came' was not meant to mean that they already had, but there has been rumbling about doing away with the bus pass, that free TV licence and probably the winter fuel allowance. The retirement age has already been raised as we know and there are plans to raise it even further to 67 for both men and for women by 2028, and higher again somewhere around 2040 if I'm not mistaken.

And has any of this along with the delayed pensions for women been raised by either of the main protagonist? 

Not on your Nelly surprise surprise - unless anybody knows different.

Let's be careful and make plans out there, old age is going to financially much harder in the future. 😛


Compare yourself to who you were yesterday, not who somebody else is today
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Re: Bridge to Nowhere

And the younger you are the more financially harder it will be when you get older......perhaps that's why a number of young people see little for them in the future.

At one time a Degree could get you a good job, today it's almost meaningless unless in a subject where there is a shortage in that area of work.

As for work no job is guaranteed these days and very hard to find a new job if you are near retirement age...

The future does not look to bright irrespective of the election results.

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Re: Bridge to Nowhere

Every advanced country has a problem with aging population, the worst are probably China and Japan, I know in Japan that people of 80+ still working.  As for younger people being worse off,  it is all relative - it has not been that long ago that there was no NHS and very little in the way of state benefits,  the 'workhouse' was a dreaded word for poor people and debtors prison as well.  To be honest most people under 50 have been raised in a stable, prosperous world and never really wanted for anything - and many are that used to getting pretty much everything they want that it comes as a shock when they have to pay the bills themselves.  I know my niece has been living with a bloke for about 3 years ( they are buying a house ) and just got married,  spent far more than they could afford on the wedding ( why do people think it is OK to spend £20K + on a wedding instead of on the house or even ( naughty word coming up ) saving it ?  They both still go back to mum and dads and a casual ' mum, have you got any toothpaste / toilet roll / washing capsules / baked beans /  etc etc etc.......... They are not young either both approaching 30... and people say young people today grow up quicker - well maybe they do physically,  but its the growing up mentally that I see problems with..

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Re: Bridge to Nowhere

Each generation expects to do better than the previous generation and most parents want their children to do better and not have to go through some of the things they did.

Perhaps we have reached a peak or by following certain rules such as get a degree your future is secure but these words of wisdom no longer apply....the rules have changed, a different skill set is required to suceed these days and not many have it.

I suspect more people will face a downward path, some to the point of being homeless others seeing hopes dashed against what they thought their later life would be like.

I doubt we will ever get back to the days of the workhouse but at least those in the workhouse had a roof over their heads and limited food to eat, bit like the old mental asylums at least there was some food and shelter compare that to what's available now

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Re: Bridge to Nowhere

@Minivanman, the 2.5% part of the triple lock is relevant when both CPI and the rise in average earnings are below that figure, which I think happened last year.

@idonno, "... a fair number tend to talk to people in a foreign language."  The (Roma?) Big Issue seller outside M&S in Ealing always says, "Big Issue please".  I don't usually have any big issues to present her with, perhaps I should ask her to have a look at PN's billing system?

@gleneagles, "At one time a Degree could get you a good job, today it's almost meaningless ..."  Very true, and the prevailing attitude of "No-one can tell me what to do!" doesn't improve someone's employability either.

@wotsup,  "... people think it is OK to spend £20K + on a wedding ..."  You may be familiar with the saying, "If people put as much into their marriage as they put into their wedding, there would be fewer marriage break-ups."

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Re: Bridge to Nowhere

There is a mass of uncertainty out there for everyone of every age. Really do feel sorry for those trying to get started with a well paid job as they seem to be few and far between, and employers treat staff (and often customers too!) with disdain.  Inequality now covers those on hundred of thousands a year at one end of the scale and those claiming in work benefits at the other.  I can understand anger and resentment.

The young do jave health and energy in their favour. The old have little to look forward to unless on a nice index linked pension. It is all a bit of a lottery in reverse - fall into the care fees trap, sometimes unavoidable, and you get financially wiped out.

Sadly, I do not expect things to get better after the Election.

 

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Re: Bridge to Nowhere


@idonno wrote:

 

As to the homeless etc we have our fair share already. No need to go the USA. Worryingly a fair number tend to talk to people in a foreign language. So much for having a job to go to etc. Or maybe they do double shifts i.e. work at night and beg during the day.


Sorry @idonno  I do not consider  it at all appropriate to dismiss concern about any nation's homeless population by a claim to have our native fair share. IMO the mention of foreign language speakers in their number, and so much about having a job to fo to seems nothing but a diversion from a real problem of the homelessness of people made so by no fault of their own. Ideally none should be left without a roof over his or her head.

However, from the film I drew a very distinct message, that the Stateside system is wicked and callous on all that fall on hard times

No one has to agree with my opinion, but in the time I have left a miracle would be nice.
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Re: Bridge to Nowhere

Falling on hard times @Luzern assumes that there was once good or least one with a time of few concerns previously?

We need to be honest about this and ask ourselves are these the homeless, or do they consist more often than not of those that for want of a better word are transient by choice or circumstance and that by its very nature will lend itself to homelessness.

Enter the immigrant, and pointing this out should not be cause for those that state the obvious to be accused of diversion bordering on racism or xenophobia.

Seems to me that when pointing out the elephant in the room, it's not the elephant that gets asked to leave. 


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