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BBC reporting on The Royal Navy

Community Veteran
Posts: 3,486
Registered: 02-10-2008

BBC reporting on The Royal Navy

Firstly - it's sad to read this news and I'm not trying to make a light-hearted comment out of someone's death,
but how typical of the BBC to misreport something.

A Naval Chief Petty Officer has been killed - yet the BBC called him an Officer !.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/tayside_and_central/8182233.stm
As Shutter knows - the senior rates do most of the day to day running of the Navy but they wouldn't want to be called Officers - would they ?
10 REPLIES
Lurker
Grafter
Posts: 1,867
Registered: 23-10-2008

Re: BBC reporting on The Royal Navy

As a layman I'd have made the same mistake - I'd contend that the mistake could be the naming of a spade as fork, rather than as a spade as many might think more natural...
Moderator
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Re: BBC reporting on The Royal Navy

Same here. I wouldn't have thought anything of it until it was pointed out to me.
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Community Veteran
Posts: 1,850
Registered: 11-08-2007

Re: BBC reporting on The Royal Navy

the beeb is constantly misreporting the news.  they laud joanna lumley for winning the ghurkas the right to live in the uk, whereas she has won them the right to apply for leave to remain, which is not the same thing at all.
in another report a woman with multiple sclerosis is claimed to have won the right to die (which she has already) instead of emphasising that what she is in actual fact doing is seeking clarification on the laws regarding partners accompanying those wishing to avail themselves of assisted suicide.
i've lost all faith in 'professional reporting' and find the 'netizens' are usually more factual, even though their reports 'cannot be verified'.
Plusnet Alumni (retired) _CN_
Plusnet Alumni (retired)
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Registered: 11-06-2007

Re: BBC reporting on The Royal Navy

their rank was an officer but not a commissioned officer rank as your most likely looking at this, I was an officer in the royal navy but in the petty officer rank
alanf
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Re: BBC reporting on The Royal Navy

It's not just the BBC. Sky News at 0:00 on Sunday.
News reader starts by saying its Monday 2nd of August and one of the first news item's captions said that that we were hearing a recording of the 999 call following Michael Jackson's death. Since when was 911 replaced?
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Re: BBC reporting on The Royal Navy

Quote from: mal0z
F
As Shutter knows - the senior rates do most of the day to day running of the Navy but they wouldn't want to be called Officers - would they ?

Yes, I agree.... 99.9% of "senior rates" are proud to be called "senior rate".... simply because that is their "status" in the hierachy of the Royal Navy, because of their experience, and length of service.  It could take as long as 7 or 8 years to become a Petty Officer, or Chief Petty Officer, yet Officers,  have only to complete 18 months basic training, from entering the serivce.
Senior rates can become "Officers" ONLY after further training at the Royal Naval College, Dartmouth.... (I think it is still the same, though I left the Navy in 1972)
Also Senior Rates, have the respect from the "upper deck" and the "lower deck".... i.e. Officers, and "junior rates".... {(unlike "middy`s" (midshipmen, usually college entrants with some money or clout ) who were the dogsbody of both,)}
Officers take the "Queen`s Shilling" or "commission"... hence the term "nco" in the army  or Non Commissioned Officer. 
The only exception to the above, that I recall, is the rank of "Warrant Officer", which was introduced about 1970 and was a stage between a Chief Petty Officer, and the Officer Rank.
Sailors, Matelots, Dabtoes, etc, are all "lower deck" from the sailing days of Nelson.
Petty Officers, Chief Petty Officers, were billeted in the "tween decks"
Officers were billeted in the Stern Castle, or  Quarterdeck, and socialised in the "ward room".
The Quarterdeck was "out of bounds" to the lower deck, who had to treat the area with great respect, saluting as they entered, and also have permission from an officer to do so.
Senior Rates, also had to respect the Quarterdeck, but did not necessarily have to have permission to enter.
If any "lower decky" needed to speak to an Officer, he would have to request it, through the Senior Rate, who would also be in attendance at the meeting, to ensure that the Officer was not attacked, and similarly, to ensure that the Officer treated the men fairly.... 
Senior Rates, (Petty Officers, and Chief Petty officers) therefore are an integral buffer between the Upper Deck, and the Lower Deck.....Officers passed down instructions/orders through them, and they carried out the necessary arrangements for those orders/instructions to be completed.
So, again, Yes, they did, and still do, carry out most of the day to day running of the Navy, it`s ships, and shore bases.
Hope that helps some of the "landlubbers" understand the difference that the BBC should have done in their initial reporting of the tragic accident.

VileReynard
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Re: BBC reporting on The Royal Navy

This is all rather petty.

Community Veteran
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Registered: 02-10-2008

Re: BBC reporting on The Royal Navy

Thanks Shutter - the definitive answer IMOO
itsme
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Re: BBC reporting on The Royal Navy

Are there Purser's in the RN or is it just a MN rank, and if so how do they fit in the pecking order?
Community Veteran
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Registered: 02-10-2008

Re: BBC reporting on The Royal Navy

As I understand it Pursers were the administrative branch of the Merchant Navy - and the equivalent in the Royal Navy was the Supply and Secretariat branch etc.
One of my great memories is a friend of the family was Chief Pursey on the RMS Queen Mary - and he gave us a free pass to tour the Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth when they berthed in Southampton in about 1966 - a wonderul tour of Bridge, cabins, restaurants, engine rooms etc etc.