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BBC Sound

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Community Veteran
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Registered: ‎02-08-2007

BBC Sound

According to a article in the Times (today) The BBC are working on the problem people have with hearing what is being said on some programs, the idea is to allow viewers to reduce the background sound thus making the dialogue more clear.

Sooner this gets done the better...be interesting to see how it works

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Aspiring Legend
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Re: BBC Sound

It does sound a bit of a babble at times and I do wonder if it's because there are more ethnic based programmes and actors from other cultures being used. Not a complaining, just an observation before anybody jumps on the anti-immigrant bandwagon.

Time was when actors, newreaders and the like all had to speak the Queens English otherwise known as 'received pronounciation' - or as I called in "plum in the gob". Then of course we started to see those regional accents being introduced into drama amd movies by the new breed of northern playrights in the 50s - and not before time.

Anybody watched the film 'Peterloo' yet - it's now on Amazon. Based in Manchester, but I'm sure my ears heared more Geoff Boycott than Gracie Fields being spoken!

Rubbish film by the way. gave up on it after about fifteen minutes and sorry @gleneagles , gone off topic a bit. Roll_eyes

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Aspiring Hero
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Re: BBC Sound

Slightly OT and perhaps I should have posted this in the thread I read the other day discussing (ISTR) TV sound, subtitles etc., but I used to have some M.A.S.H. DVDs a few years ago (may still have them) on which you could select the soundtrack, the choice being with or without the 'canned laughter'.  IMO it was good to be able to switch that intrusive noise off!

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Aspiring Legend
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Re: BBC Sound

I used to hate canned laughter, and still do.

Reading the other day that people were more likely to laugh when they heard it? Some sort of tribe mentality I suspect and one that we all get drawn into. Fine when it's genuine, but I doubt it somehow, and much like generated audience applause, and now 'has been jaded actors' now being presented as 'legends' on some half baked television show.

 

 

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Seasoned Champion
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Re: BBC Sound

On a lot of TV these days the background is too loud ( Gentleman Jack is a recent example ) and there is too much difference in sound level between the way actors speak,  I know a lot of older actors had to learn to 'project' their voice because of the stage work they did their apprenticeship in and the lack of microphones and sound systems.  Truth is many actors and singers these days have really 'small' voices that could not be heard more than 10 feet away without their microphones and big amps.  I bet production companies still skimping on sound engineers to cut costs, and they were the people who used to keep the sound levels under control and within the range of normal human hearing.  I also notice with digital TV every time you change channel you have to adjust the sound up and down - some are inaudible and some blow your eardrums if you are not quick with the volume or mute button. 

 

Don't start me on the relentless high volume of adverts, seems the trick is to compress all the sound right into the top of the level that is allowed by OFCOM, I often hit mute button for ads now,  or better still record programs and fast forward the ads.  Our Humax Freesat box has a neat function you can set an ' skip ' time for 2 minutes or 4 minutes etc ( ours set to 4 minutes ) and when you hit the skip forward button ( two forward arrows with a vertical bar) the recording instantly skips 4 minutes - which is the average time of an ad break give or take a few seconds.

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Aspiring Legend
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Re: BBC Sound

@wotsup 

I often have my headphones on and as you say when swapping channels or those adverts appear, I almost jump out of my skin even though I have poor hearing. Same with the Kindle or laptop. 

 

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Re: BBC Sound


@wotsup wrote:

... I also notice with digital TV every time you change channel you have to adjust the sound up and down - some are inaudible and some blow your eardrums if you are not quick with the volume or mute button. 


@wotsup 

I think you made a similar comment recently.  Doesn't your TV have a setting somewhere in the sound menu(s) for 'Automatically Adjust Volume' or similar?  If so that might solve that particular problem.

Just checked my Samsung and it's called 'Auto Volume', available settings are 'Off' 'Normal' and 'Night'.  I have it set on 'Normal'.

 

Don't start me on the relentless high volume of adverts, seems the trick is to compress all the sound right into the top of the level that is allowed by OFCOM, I often hit mute button for ads now,  or better still record programs and fast forward the ads.  Our Humax Freesat box has a neat function you can set an ' skip ' time for 2 minutes or 4 minutes etc ( ours set to 4 minutes ) and when you hit the skip forward button ( two forward arrows with a vertical bar) the recording instantly skips 4 minutes - which is the average time of an ad break give or take a few seconds.


Like you I watch most stuff recorded and skip the ads in a similar fashion to you, so I never get to hear them, but I do recall years ago before DTV they used to blast out sometimes so it was always wise to have the RC at hand just mute them.

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Re: BBC Sound

@RobPN 

I'll check that out on my TV.

I wonder if it's on KIndle as that is by far the worst I've found. 

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Re: BBC Sound


@RobPN wrote:

@wotsup wrote:

... I also notice with digital TV every time you change channel you have to adjust the sound up and down - some are inaudible and some blow your eardrums if you are not quick with the volume or mute button. 


@wotsup 

I think you made a similar comment recently.  Doesn't your TV have a setting somewhere in the sound menu(s) for 'Automatically Adjust Volume' or similar?  If so that might solve that particular problem.

Just checked my Samsung and it's called 'Auto Volume', available settings are 'Off' 'Normal' and 'Night'.  I have it set on 'Normal'.

 There is a function to set ( compensate) sound level for each channel  or input device ( satellite box, DVD player etc. ) so if I find a channel that is always 'loud' I can adjust it, but no overall function to automatically level out the difference in sound levels  - it sometimes seems to be as much to do with the program than the channel.