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Are the days of fixed line broadband numbered?

glloyd
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Are the days of fixed line broadband numbered?

With the spread of the available 4G with speeds much higher than fixed line for a lot of people are the days of fixed line BB numbered.? Prices are bound to drop as providers install 4G and competition hots up. A lot of people already don't use their home phones
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Re: Are the days of fixed line broadband numbered?

To a point, yes its days are numbered. On the other hand its not suitable for everyone. I could quite happily live with just a 3G connection however my missus likes a landline connection for skype etc. Plus mobile bandwidth is more expensive (although as you point out, this will change and become cheaper).
Trouble is though that any RF frequency can only carry a certain amount of data before it becomes... full. Now i'm no expert on radio spectrums and the like (no doubt shutter will have more to say on this) but if everyone in the same street decided to use their super 4G phones to watch youtube videos all evening at the same time.. well the system won't cope with it.
Then there are people like me who still believe that any RF signal (eg wifi, 3/4G) is harmful to health. I try to avoid it most of the time if i'm honest but i accept that we're all swimming in it where ever we are these days. I do find 3G incredibly useful (infact i'm using it to post this as i'm stuck in bed with a cold) however i do avoid it if possible. We don't even use wifi... we use ethernet cables... for laptops in our place!
Then you have to think about the reliability... 3/4G is still patchy in many places and so the landline delivers reliability that you can't find on a mobile connection. It also doesn't need its flaming battery recharged  Crazy
I see it as a post office / email situation. Email took a lot of business from the post office but it still has to deal with parcels and normal letters where the sender doesn't have your email address. Landlines are without a doubt going to start dwindling but i doubt they'll ever fade away completely.
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wisty
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Re: Are the days of fixed line broadband numbered?

Probably not.
WHICH reports that "... average 4G speeds are slowing – from 19Mbps to 10.16Mbps in just under a year. The reason? It’s likely because more customers have signed up to 4G increasing demand on the network and slowing speeds."
If everyone with fixed line broadband switched to 4G, network contention would escalate to the point that the service would probably be unusable. There is a finite limit to the bandwidth available over radio and everyone in a cell area has to share it. With FTTC, although the same is theoretically true the limit is far far higher.
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Re: Are the days of fixed line broadband numbered?

At the moment, I'd say no, simply because of my experience of being on a 3G carrier (Three UK) who had unlimited tethering available, get too many people on the network torrenting files and the speeds plummet, so they took that unlimited feature away in order to free up the space that the people downloading terabytes of data in a month were hogging...
In 10 years, possibly, but with the advances in copper and fibre networks increasing day by day, I'd say a fixed line, be it copper or fibreoptic, would still be commonplace to provide a more reliable and faster service than what could be achieved over the airwaves... Smiley
nanotm
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Re: Are the days of fixed line broadband numbered?

maybe there will be a new form of hybrid system in the future, fibre lines to fake tree antennas every few hundred meters supplying 5g service to everyone at home and at work and whilst on the move (something similar was rolled out to the townships in Africa many years back) and there will be an end to personal lines for all but the richest in society but the mobile stuff will be practically free....
at least that's what many sci-fi writers would have us believe is the way ahead and there probably more right than wrong
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sjptd
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Re: Are the days of fixed line broadband numbered?

I think the days are probably numbered,  but that it is a very large number still ....
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Re: Are the days of fixed line broadband numbered?

Quote from: nanotm
maybe there will be a new form of hybrid system in the future, fibre lines to fake tree antennas every few hundred meters supplying 5g service to everyone at home and at work and whilst on the move

You still fail to understand that radio can only carry a finite amount of data. Even if you did have all these trees everywhere they would still have to work in a mesh fashion which would still limit the amount of data that could be carried.
To put it bluntly nano, until they can come up with something far better than radio, 3/4/5/6/7/8/9G speeds will always decrease with the more users that are on the system.
Ultimately I see quantum entaglement as the future of wireless communications but if that were ever really feasible it's not going to happen for a good few decares at least.
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nanotm
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Re: Are the days of fixed line broadband numbered?

everything is finite,
with radio waves the biggest limiting factor to the bandwidth available is distance between transmitters, 5g trials demonstrate this quite effectively (users found that the further away from the trial antenna the slower the service became and at a few hundred feet it dropped as low as normal 3g standards), if your link a multitude of base stations to a bundle of fibre pipes you achieve two things, 1stly you decrease the distance between users and base stations vastly increasing the service, 2ndly you decrease the number of users per base stations vastly decreasing the ratio of contention and thus increasing the effective connection speeds.
for QEd to leave sci-fi and become sci-fact they would need to be able to create a stable multipoint unit capable of sending more than a single bit of data between points, viable QED's are likely a millennia away, anything that ultra secure wouldn't be allowed into the public domain until there is nothing but a socialist utopia left of society by which time nobody will care about security of communications .....
just because your paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get you
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Re: Are the days of fixed line broadband numbered?

Adair Towers is located in a valley floor with hills around. We can't receive digital TV or digital radio due to a line of site issue with terrestrial transmitters. Our TV comes via satellite and the radio via the (copper) Internet. Fortunately on boring old copper ADSL we're blessed with 18 Mbps, while waiting for OpenReach to remove its corporate thumb from its fundament over the delivery of optical fibre.
Not all geographic locations can use wireless based broadband delivery in common usage.
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Re: Are the days of fixed line broadband numbered?

@7up..... sorry,  not that much of an expert to give an opinion....
however, when I was in the navy ( swing the lights  Grin Grin )....
if we had to "go aloft" to re-work an aerial or replace an insulator, we had to make sure that we obtained the "transmitter keys" of all aerials within the area we were going to work.... that included "normal" L.F.      M.F.  H.F... and up to  radar (frequency)  aerials... in other words, there was a RF risk involved  ( talking about 1960 onwards, but I would think that these rules were in force, almost from the first install of radio equipment on ships )...
nanotm
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Re: Are the days of fixed line broadband numbered?

if not from the off certainly once they discovered a cooked squid or two they would of put such regulations in place
just because your paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get you
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Re: Are the days of fixed line broadband numbered?

I forgot to mention, that it was probably because someone got their hands burnt when holding a "live" aerial, as the power on the transmitter output could be anything up to a kilowatt, which could produce severe burns in such a situation...
the danger from radiated R.F. affecting the human body would be another, later, discovery, but again... we were using very high power transmitters,
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Re: Are the days of fixed line broadband numbered?

I once got a zap off a CB radio aerial back when I had such equipment, didn't harm me aside from a light burn... Smiley
Reminds me of this article though, bunch of kids tried scaling up Pontop Pike earlier this year:
http://www.consettstanleyadvertiser.co.uk/news/11076351.Four_teenagers_arrested_for_climbing_300ft_u...
Shame they didn't stay up there, evolution and all, survival of the smartest... Roll eyes
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Re: Are the days of fixed line broadband numbered?

Quote from: nanotm
if your link a multitude of base stations to a bundle of fibre pipes you achieve two things, 1stly you decrease the distance between users and base stations vastly increasing the service, 2ndly you decrease the number of users per base stations vastly decreasing the ratio of contention and thus increasing the effective connection speeds.

You're in cloud cuckoo land again. Do you know how much it would cost to dig trenches and install fibre optics to every base station like that? - £Seriously_Mega_Money. Therefore the only way you could do it is to have one base station per area linked and the others, linked by their own RF mesh network - again, as I said previously this in itself then consumes bandwidth as the different nodes communicate with each other.
Admittedly node to node communication could be on a different frequency but then you will need an even higher frequency and data rate while giving the connected users a lower one.
Your idea of having more base stations may well be good and yes you are correct that it would reduce users per node but it then raises an entirely different infrastructure problem that you'd not thought of.
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nanotm
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Re: Are the days of fixed line broadband numbered?

if they could do it in the gehtto's of cape town there's no reason why they cant do it in the civilised world, albeit utilising Point To Point laser for node to node communications in any areas where there is no easy to access phone hook-up, of course digging a hole for the fibre lines wont be a problem given that there supposed to be installing them everywhere anyhow and lets not forget such base stations require power so they would be laying 2 sets of cables anyway as they move the systems around ...

the exact method of tunnelling in the cable is also something we could look to Africa/Asia for the solution, they use micro diggers to shuttle a cable from point a to point b without disrupting the surface in a similar fashion to the way the chunnel was dug with that giant behemoth they nicknamed "the mole", not that its exactly a new idea sappers have been doing such things by hand for millennia, from the myans, the Incas the Aztecs and the romans to the civic works department who created London's sewers and underground rail services there have been people tunnelling stuff into paces so as not to disrupt the surrounding area's more than absolutely necessary now they have the capability to do such things far faster without risking human lives
just because your paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get you