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Any budding astronomers?

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Re: Any budding astronomers?

Well that condenses my previous post doesn't it Embarrassed
However Roll_eyes in the price range Mav is looking at auto-setting will not be available, so he will still need a Mk1 eyeball to locate the pole star.
Experience; is something you gain, just after you needed it most.

When faced with two choices, simply toss a coin. It works not because it settles the question for you. But because in that brief moment while the coin is in the air. You suddenly know what you are hoping for.
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Re: Any budding astronomers?

And finally, when you go out on a clear dark night to your comfortable chairs or loungers, armed with your copy of "Naked Eye Astronomy" (and a red light to read it by, if you've got one) Tell your neighbours what you're doing!! and to turn off all their lights please and the local council to turn off the street lights. Make sure you let your eyes accustom to the dark, you will be surprised how much more you can see after a couple of minutes.
Experience; is something you gain, just after you needed it most.

When faced with two choices, simply toss a coin. It works not because it settles the question for you. But because in that brief moment while the coin is in the air. You suddenly know what you are hoping for.
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Re: Any budding astronomers?

I remember as a child being very interested in our solar system, planets etc. But one thing I could never do is see the different constellations and understand how one could make a bear or whatever out of various stars positions.
Maybe over 40 years later I'll actually understand and noe be able to see them Wink

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Re: Any budding astronomers?

In the northern skies only two look remotely like their names: Leo (The Lion, which could with some imagination look vaguely like a lion at at rest Sphinx like) Cygnus (The Swan, can look vaguely like a swan in flight in plan view, and there's Scorpio (The Scorpion, a beautifully bright constellation but is mostly below the horizon from the UK)
Again, for northern constellations the names are from Greek mythology, but as you say bear little resemblance to their traditional shape.
The southern skies are even worse, they do have The Cross (Crux Australis that appears on the national flags of Australia and New Zealand) which is unmistakeable. The southern equivalent of the pole star is not far from Crux, but is not viable with the naked eye. Since those constellations in the south have much later names they can be rather dull with such as The Furness, Crater and Norma (no don't ask) But the south does have fabulous views of the Milky Way and the Magallenic Clouds the south also leads the direction to the centre of our galaxy.
Experience; is something you gain, just after you needed it most.

When faced with two choices, simply toss a coin. It works not because it settles the question for you. But because in that brief moment while the coin is in the air. You suddenly know what you are hoping for.
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Re: Any budding astronomers?

Quote from: Petlew
Well that condenses my previous post doesn't it Embarrassed

Not at all Peter.
1) Not everyone has a smart-phone.
2) You still need to eyeball Polaris and manually align the telescope.
3) There's no substitute for experienced assistance. Smiley

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Re: Any budding astronomers?

Wnat to see the evening flybys of the International Space Station this week?
Times for London : http://www.spaceweather.com/flybys/search_results.php?lat=52.0&long=0.0&offset=0&country=GB&
Or your UK location : http://www.spaceweather.com/flybys/state.php?country=UK
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Re: Any budding astronomers?

@Thunderclap, checkout this and others like it in a recent thread: http://community.plus.net/forum/index.php/topic,115776.msg1011593.html#msg1011593
Experience; is something you gain, just after you needed it most.

When faced with two choices, simply toss a coin. It works not because it settles the question for you. But because in that brief moment while the coin is in the air. You suddenly know what you are hoping for.
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Re: Any budding astronomers?

Quote from: Petlew
The southern skies are even worse, they do have The Cross (Crux Australis that appears on the national flags of Australia and New Zealand) which is unmistakeable.


But still often confused with the constellation Vela Wink
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Re: Any budding astronomers?

Quote from: Petlew
@Thunderclap, checkout this and others like it in a recent thread: http://community.plus.net/forum/index.php/topic,115776.msg1011593.html#msg1011593

Thanks for that. If you view the ISS through binnoculars this week, you may see the HTV4 spacecraft, a japaneese resupply ship, floating alongside. Onboard, is a toy robot that's designed to bond with the crew... or maybe laser it's way through the hull so it can take control of the ISS.
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Re: Any budding astronomers?

A trail photo of the ISS I took on a 30 second exposure as it approached Orion.

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Re: Any budding astronomers?

@strat- nice picture ;), when was it taken,
I'd guess sometime in March at dusk
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Re: Any budding astronomers?

SWMBO is very happy with her present - we picked it up yesterday evening from Oxford Street.
Never realised how big and heavy the box would be Shocked
Will probably attempt to put it together tonight or tomorrow.
Thanks for the ISS links. Strangley SWMBO called me to the front garden last night to point out a bright celestial object moving across the sky. This was just after we got home at around 11pm. Looking at the 2nd sight it most likely was the ISS.

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Courage is resistance to fear, mastery of fear, not absence of fear - Mark Twain
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Re: Any budding astronomers?

What did you get in the end ?
Did the book arrive?
Experience; is something you gain, just after you needed it most.

When faced with two choices, simply toss a coin. It works not because it settles the question for you. But because in that brief moment while the coin is in the air. You suddenly know what you are hoping for.
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Re: Any budding astronomers?

Got the Jessop's one. Found a voucher online for 10% off so got it for under £90.
Received an email two days ago saying the book has been dispatched so, hopefully, that will arrived tomorrow or Monday.

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Courage is resistance to fear, mastery of fear, not absence of fear - Mark Twain
He who feared he would not succeed sat still

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Posts: 7,397
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Registered: ‎30-08-2007

Re: Any budding astronomers?

Great, happy viewing to you and you're SWMBO.
Experience; is something you gain, just after you needed it most.

When faced with two choices, simply toss a coin. It works not because it settles the question for you. But because in that brief moment while the coin is in the air. You suddenly know what you are hoping for.