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Any budding astronomers?

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Re: Any budding astronomers?

Thanks, Petlew.
All the Meade ones I found  seem to be in the hundreds of pounds.
Found a couple of Celestrons:
PowerSeeker 40AZ
PowerSeeker 50AZ
The 50AZ is just about the upper limit of my budget at this time. Still a lot to pay if this turns out to be a fad. Although, I can always resell on ebay!
Any thoughts on the above two?

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Re: Any budding astronomers?

Yes, useless for astronomy don't bother...table top? how are you going to point straight up? lay on the floor under the table while it falls on your head when you try to follow a star...
Toys really Mav, you'll be deeply disappointed if you buy one of these..
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Re: Any budding astronomers?

Still classed as toys but your better off with something like
http://www.telescopeplanet.co.uk/celestron-firstscope
or
http://www.scopesnskies.com/prod/sky-watcher/infinity-76/explorer-3i/starter-scope.html
both have interchangeable eyepieces, but both need a table (or car bonnet) to mount on 
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Re: Any budding astronomers?

Agreed, to the first, not so sure about the starter scope though, looks like a bit of a waste of money to me, like binoculars stand little chance of keeping it still. At least the firstscope has a sort of mount. As long as you treat it for what it is (a toy) it might well lead on to better things...if it doesn't put you off the whole idea. I would guess its forte would be enlarging the view of the Moon.
You must remember all objects in the night sky appear to be in constant motion and very fast across the narrow field of view of a telescope. They're not moving, but you are on the spinning Earth, their apparent motion is magnified in a telescope. Keeping a star centred in the view of the firstscope will be quite tricky I would think, but if you can get on with it, then anything you may upgrade to eventually will be a pleasurable doddle.
Experience; is something you gain, just after you needed it most.

When faced with two choices, simply toss a coin. It works not because it settles the question for you. But because in that brief moment while the coin is in the air. You suddenly know what you are hoping for.
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Re: Any budding astronomers?

If your budget will stand it as a buy now, I'd give this one serious consideration: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Celestron-Powerseeker-675-Telescope-model-21045-/261259213579?pt=UK_Photog...
Experience; is something you gain, just after you needed it most.

When faced with two choices, simply toss a coin. It works not because it settles the question for you. But because in that brief moment while the coin is in the air. You suddenly know what you are hoping for.
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Re: Any budding astronomers?

Few people have access to a properly dark sky, without any light pollution.

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Re: Any budding astronomers?

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Re: Any budding astronomers?

That's a good choice journeys. Like the look of that, might even put in a bid myself Cool
@vilefoxdemonofdoom, sadly very true. Some parts of major towns and cities never have a really dark sky. Don't know what they're missing.
Experience; is something you gain, just after you needed it most.

When faced with two choices, simply toss a coin. It works not because it settles the question for you. But because in that brief moment while the coin is in the air. You suddenly know what you are hoping for.
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Re: Any budding astronomers?

Quote from: vilefoxdemonofdoom
Few people have access to a properly dark sky, without any light pollution.

On the main road next to us the orange sodium lights have all been replaced with new LED lamps giving a blue/white light which is confined to the road and has made a great difference to the night sky.
All that's needed now is for the rest of the city to be upgraded in a like manner.

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Re: Any budding astronomers?

Nowadays, many of the great American observatories built at the turn of the 20th century suffer serious light pollution from Las Vagas when it was just a glimmer in the eye of the bookies.
But its not the only source, Los Angeles disturbs the observatories of CalTech and others. 
The main reason major observatories are sited in the remotest parts of the world now. Or outside the Earth's turbulent atmosphere.
The Milky Way is a glorious sight on a clear dark moonless night away from any light pollution. Not something easily seen from northern towns and cities (that's hemisphere not north of England) If you're unlucky enough to suffer a power cut on a dark clear night and have a good south western aspect go out and enjoy.
Experience; is something you gain, just after you needed it most.

When faced with two choices, simply toss a coin. It works not because it settles the question for you. But because in that brief moment while the coin is in the air. You suddenly know what you are hoping for.
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Re: Any budding astronomers?

Thanks for the links Petlew and Journeys
Unfortunately both are collection only and too far away from me to make it viable adding in petrol costs Sad

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Re: Any budding astronomers?

Any thoughts on these two?
Celestron Travel Scope 70 Astronomical and Land Telescope with FREE Backpack
celestron PowerSeeker 60 Astronomical Refractor Telescope

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Re: Any budding astronomers?

Quote from: Mav
Any thoughts on these two?

I personally prefer 'reflectors' to 'refractors', better light gatherers more 'light per £', hence more magnification potential.
http://stargazerslounge.com/topic/57239-reflector-vs-refractor/
remember with a 'reflector' the image is inverted.
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Re: Any budding astronomers?

There is always the armchair option. Plenty of free software - especially Linux.
http://shatters.net/celestia/ is available for the 3 main desktop OS's.

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Re: Any budding astronomers?

As the previous telescope like it you listed Mav the scope 70 is really a terrestrial telescope more suited to bird spotters and the like. I would guess the word "astronomical" is not very accurate. If the view is right-side-up its not astronomical.
The other one, uhmm! I nearly sent you this link, but decided not to. Its ultra simple with a limited alt azimuth mount that will prove a pain to use in practice that you will almost certainly have to move in two axis to follow any object. If the the 60 refers to 60mm for the front object lens then its a bit small for light gathering power. But its probably a reasonable starting point. But you may well find it a bit limited in the long run.
Otherwise I agree with journeys about reflector v refractors. However reflectors can be a bit more of a chore to set up correctly.
Experience; is something you gain, just after you needed it most.

When faced with two choices, simply toss a coin. It works not because it settles the question for you. But because in that brief moment while the coin is in the air. You suddenly know what you are hoping for.