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Another promise

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Another promise

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Re: Another promise

A promise made by a politician? It's broken already, simply because it's been made by a politician... Grin
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Re: Another promise

Provided it leads to a separation of OpenReach from BT and supplier compensation to individuals for engineer no-shows I'm all in favour.  At present, rather than a national infrastructure, the design and operation of the network is structured to maximise BT profit.
Now Zen, but a +Net residue.
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Re: Another promise

Already mentioned here http://community.plus.net/forum/index.php/topic,145285.0.html
This gives a bit more information http://www.thinkbroadband.com/news/7236-government-declares-10-mbps-uso-as-legal-right-by-2020.html
My thoughts are that this will lead to two things
Accelerated FTTC rollout but also provision of a satellite/wireless based alternative for the really remote areas as there isn't a sensible way of boosting ADSL speeds which are low because of the distance from the exchange.
There is nothing specified as to who would provide the satellite/wireless option as it is unlikely to be BT Openreach and it will be expensive
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Re: Another promise

Satellite broadband has the problem of high latency, circa 700 millisec compared with 20 ms on FTTC. This plays havoc with interactive application.  Satellite also has a high charge for data volumes. It really isn't a suitable option for consumer broadband.
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Re: Another promise

so what would you suggest
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Re: Another promise

Well, maybe they could get on with putting fibre lines in, as there's only so much the old GPO-installed wiring can take before it ends up with thousands miles of black copper which is of no use to anyone and nobody connected... Grin
After all, they've got plenty shareholders, maybe if they want returns on their investments, they should pile more money in or see their money go byebye... Grin
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Re: Another promise

There is no economic justification for a private company to add fibre for the last 5% in England or the 10% in Wales without a rather large subsidy from us the taxpayers
There is however a much more cost effective solution - expand the 4G coverage as that would only need a limited number of extra transmitters in those areas where FTTC isn't available or practical
itsme
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Re: Another promise

Quote from: AlaricAdair
Provided it leads to a separation of OpenReach from BT and supplier compensation to individuals for engineer no-shows I'm all in favour.  At present, rather than a national infrastructure, the design and operation of the network is structured to maximise BT profit.

Will ISP's be prepare to invest into the a national infrastructure?
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Re: Another promise

Quote from: Oldjim
.. you suggest

I'd say optical fibre. Install it now in rural areas and stop messing around with stopgap measures which are really only suitable for townies. As to the argument it is not economically viable, perhaps that should be said for roads, water, power?  No, this is a national infrastructure issue where we should be investing for the future and not BT's annual profit line. There are loads of investors who'd be willing to take part of the investment of providing a national infrastructure.
If Hicksville USA can install 100 Gbps fibre I'm sure it can be done in the UK, though I doubt it would be possible under the current executive team at BT.
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Re: Another promise

That argument has one whopping big hole in it
Are we to upgrade all rural roads to dual carriageways with a 70mph speed limit or even less extreme to full two vehicle width roads - Of course we aren't

Investors would only invest if there is a satisfactory return on capital and supplying remote rural areas with FTTP certainly won't generate that
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Re: Another promise

Comparing a minor road to a dual carriageway is not a valid comparison of the cost of running a fibre cable compared to running a copper cable (plus intermediary boxes) to people in a remote area.
If the people of the B4RNS project can deliver fibre based 100 mbps in rural areas at competitive prices, I'm sure BT could too.
The only major barrier is establishment ego. "Yeah we can sweat this strowger based copper cabling for a few more years. It's only 70 years old". An investment in fibre leads to lower operational costs, lower fault rate and far greater potential for development. The arguments presented by BT remind me of the opposition I faced in a major company when I said they should rip out the IBM Token Ring Network and install a network based on a TCP/IP network over a structured cabling system.
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Re: Another promise

Some PN customers in other sections of this forum have complained about reduced speeds, I have no idea if this is down to PN or some other reason but it hardly squares with the governments claim about top broadband speeds for all
itsme
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Re: Another promise

Quote from: AlaricAdair
The only major barrier is establishment ego. "Yeah we can sweat this strowger based copper cabling for a few more years. It's only 70 years old". An investment in fibre leads to lower operational costs, lower fault rate and far greater potential for development. The arguments presented by BT remind me of the opposition I faced in a major company when I said they should rip out the IBM Token Ring Network and install a network based on a TCP/IP network over a structured cabling system.

What are BT requirements for working telephones during power cuts and can they achieve this replacing copper with fibre?
nanotm
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Re: Another promise

bt's requirements are that their equipment is able to run for a minimum of 12 hours during a power outage, the battery units for fibre are smaller and cheaper to run than those of the old copper (there also more reliable and where possible both the exchange and cabinets have a full 48hour power unit installed) under the copper line system a power outage to the exchange took out the phones as well so fibre is better in that regard.
with respect to the USO, whatever law is introduced today will be tweaked in a year or two (when it becomes apparent they wont make it) or it will be re-written /withdrawn by the next parliament (because labour hate it when we are all informed about things without needing to resort to their bought and paid for union lead mouthpieces like the traditional media)  I have no doubts its all smoke n mirrors unless the government re-nationalises the infrastructure stuff (which it absolutely cannot do whilst we are in the EU) they cannot bring the country up to speed, in t hat respect we are just like the USA, giant swaths of the country are still on 56k or worse internet, other parts are on 100gbps or better fibre the only thing that determines what speed people get is the willingness of the corporation in their area wanting to do it for their own reasons, hicksvile got 100gbps fibre because google wanted bragging rights, not because of any other reason / and the same will be true for this country, we are lucky that BT wanted to monetise network tv otherwise we would still be languishing on up to 12mbps copper only ....
just because your paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get you