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Amazon Spoof/spam email

Community Veteran
Posts: 16,862
Thanks: 1,141
Fixes: 13
Registered: 06-11-2007

Amazon Spoof/spam email

Just got this one....
Quote

Hello,
Thank you for your order. We’ll let you know once your item(s) have dispatched.You can view the status of your order or make changes to it by visiting Your Orders on Amazon.co.uk.
Order Details
Order #777-0609990-7972127
Placed on September 26, 2013
Order details and invoice in attached file.
Need to make changes to your order? Visit our Help page for more information and video guides.
We hope to see you again soon.
Amazon.co.uk


Sorry, you spamming git... but you can`t get me fooled......  I don`t use Amazon !  HA!  HA !  HA !  Grin Grin Grin
10 REPLIES
Superuser
Superuser
Posts: 2,519
Thanks: 219
Fixes: 5
Registered: 06-04-2007

Re: Amazon Spoof/spam email

I got that one this morning as well.  Sent from a yahoo email address as well!
Phil
Community Veteran
Posts: 6,307
Thanks: 86
Fixes: 3
Registered: 08-01-2008

Re: Amazon Spoof/spam email

Got one yesterday and another today (on two different business email accounts, neither ever used for Amazon)
Both claiming to be from auto-confirmnnnn@amazon.co.uk (where nnnn is a different 4 digit number in each case) but both also showing yahoo addresses.
One had the following helpfully added by the mail provider:
Quote
----- english text -----
This mail contained a virus or a file violating the mail policy.
The file has been repaired or deleted.
Hint: most infected mails do not originate from the given sender address.
Notifying the sender does not make sense in these cases.
----- deutscher Text -----
Diese Mail enthielt einen Virus oder eine Datei, die gegen die Mail-Richtlinien verst��t.
Die Datei wurde repariert oder entfernt.
Hinweis: die meisten Virenmails stammen nicht vom angegebenen Absender.
Diesen zu kontaktieren, macht in der Regel keinen Sinn.
----- Attachment(s) -----
Repaired/repariert:
No attachments are in this category.
Deleted/entfernt:
1. ORDER-NNR-3684248-5339114.zip/Order details.exe: Backdoor.Trojan
Blocked/blockiert:
No attachments are in this category.

These emails appeared to be addressed to several people with cc to others - an order confirmation will never be addressed to anyone other than the person placing an order.
I have not opened the zip files (though I'm tempted to open one using a Linux live CD just for a look). Crazy
DO NOT open these attachments on any Windows system!

Call me 'w23'
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alanf
Aspiring Pro
Posts: 1,931
Thanks: 77
Fixes: 1
Registered: 17-10-2007

Re: Amazon Spoof/spam email

I have got off very lightly re spam over the years. Most of my email accounts (Plusnet and Yahoo!) have remained completely spam-free.
The oldest of my current email accounts however started to get occasional offers of exciting investment opportunities etc. a few months ago.
Yesterday I got my first email from "my bank" informing me of problems with my account. I was not convinced.
1) Yahoo! put into a Junk mail folder.
2) I don't have a Barclays account.
3) As far as I am aware Barclays UK would not be sending out messages from some weird German domain.
VileReynard
Seasoned Pro
Posts: 10,591
Thanks: 193
Fixes: 9
Registered: 01-09-2007

Re: Amazon Spoof/spam email

You appear to trust Barclays a lot.
Quote
As early as 2005 there was evidence Barclays had tried to manipulate dollar Libor and Euribor (the eurozone's equivalent of Libor)
rates at the request of its derivatives traders and other banks.
Misconduct was widespread, involving staff in New York, London and Tokyo as well as external traders.
Between January 2005 and June 2009, Barclays derivatives traders made a total of 257 requests to fix Libor and Euribor rates,
according to a report by the FSA.

RichAllen
Grafter
Posts: 805
Registered: 14-09-2013

Re: Amazon Spoof/spam email

I used to get rather a lot of "phishing" emails, mostly claiming to be from "Halifax", who I've never used, and also from "Natwest", the first time I got one from Natwest I rang them up after Googling their website and informed them that some silly person was "phishing" in their name, and they were very concerned and thanked me for telling them.
Community Veteran
Posts: 7,154
Thanks: 54
Fixes: 2
Registered: 30-08-2007

Re: Amazon Spoof/spam email

I use Amazon quite a lot, but funnily enough I hardly ever open the succession of emails that arrive in my inbox from them. Mostly because I'm usually pretty sure what they're going to say. This is caused since it is very rare to have a problem with transactions or deliveries with Amazon, so I don't bother unless it seems a long time waiting for a delivery, then I'll go back and take a look. Probably the email equivalent of not opening snail post.
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Community Veteran
Posts: 16,862
Thanks: 1,141
Fixes: 13
Registered: 06-11-2007

Re: Amazon Spoof/spam email

Sent the email to Amazon, complete with headers..... here is a copy ( probably auto generated ) of reply....
Quote

Thank you for writing to Amazon.com to bring this to our attention.
Your message has been forwarded to our security department, and we will investigate the situation.  Please note that you may not receive a personal response.
In all likelihood, the message you received was not sent to you by Amazon.com.  We strongly advise that you *not* send any information about yourself back to this individual (especially your credit card number or any personal information).
If you have already submitted any personal information to this person via e-mail or on a potentially fraudulent web site, you may wish to contact Customer Service for assistance.  To send an e-mail to Customer Service, please visit www.amazon.com/contact-us/
In the future, if you are ever uncertain of the validity of an e-mail, even from us, don't click on any supplied links--instead, type our web site address "www.amazon.com" directly into your browser and follow the regular links to Your Account.  Many unscrupulous spoofers mislead consumers by displaying one URL while taking the visitor to another.
By typing in a well-known address you can avoid this trick.
Also, please be assured that Amazon.com is not in the business of selling customer information. Many spammers and spoofers use programs that randomly generate e-mail addresses, in the hope that some percentage of these randomly-generated addresses will actually exist.
If you are trying to contact us about something other than a spoofed e-mail message, please contact Customer Service for assistance. To send an e-mail to Customer Service, please visit www.amazon.com/contact-us/
If you encounter any other uses of the Amazon.com name that you think may be fraudulent, please do not hesitate to contact us again.
Thank you again for taking the time to notify us of this situation.

Sincerely,
Amazon.com
http://www.amazon.com/

Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 16,569
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Re: Amazon Spoof/spam email

I got a bit miffed when I reported a spoof email to Paypal.
In my original email I explained that I believed it to be a fishing email, that I had not and would not open any attachments and have deleted the original from my system.
Their response was to tell me it was most likely a spoof email, not to open the attachments and to delete it from my system Cheesy
I suppose in their defence it was most likely an auto-response rather human intervention. That was a few years ago.

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Devonian
Grafter
Posts: 1,854
Registered: 01-05-2011

Re: Amazon Spoof/spam email

I've had it to.  Roll eyes
Seriously, do people actually get fooled by these emails any more?
RichAllen
Grafter
Posts: 805
Registered: 14-09-2013

Re: Amazon Spoof/spam email

Fortunately nobody's daft enough to fall for the scams any more.
I haven't had any spam on Plusnet, yet, the weekly emails from Amazon trying to sell me stuff don't count as spam.
dick:quote