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A Spoonful of Sugar.......

Infinity
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A Spoonful of Sugar.......

A quick and easy calculation, divide the number of grams of Sugar by 4, to get the equivalent number of teaspoons of Sugar in any nutritionally labelled food.
Apparently, on average, we’re eating 700 g of sugar a week. That’s 175 teaspoons.
ie 25 teaspoons a day !
And precisely double the ‘safe’ NHS limit.
Which does seem rather a lot, but it is an average (Chocaholics ??)
Some researchers say these figures should be much lower — about six teaspoons a day for women and eight teaspoons for men.
There is talk of actually labelling some products with a visual image of the number of teaspoons of Sugar contained therein.
24 REPLIES
Midnight_Caller
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Re: A Spoonful of Sugar.......

Have you a link to the data?
TORPC
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Re: A Spoonful of Sugar.......

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Re: A Spoonful of Sugar.......

I expect I'm currently eating more than that.
I'm struggling to keep up (eat) all the strawberries and raspberries I'm picking in my garden.
All lovely with a sprinkle of sugar and plenty of double cream. Smiley
Infinity
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Re: A Spoonful of Sugar.......

Cut sugar to just four teaspoons a day, say dentists:
Call on Government to force food industry to lower amounts in all products to tackle tooth decay
4 teaspoons is equivalent to less  than half a normal can of Coca-Cola, two digestives or one bowl of Frosties

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2660817/Cut-sugar-just-four-teaspoons-day-say-dentists-Cal...

Quote from: Midnight
Have you a link to the data?

http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/notes/2014/consultation-sugar-guideline/en/
The research paper, co-authored by Prof Sheiham and obesity expert Professor Philip James, of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, is published in the Public Health Nutrition Journal.
Midnight_Caller
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Re: A Spoonful of Sugar.......

It's all spin to raise taxes and by the time they're finished the sheeple will be screaming for taxes on fattening food.
Community Veteran
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Re: A Spoonful of Sugar.......

The amount water costs it must be very fattening and full of sugar.
TORPC
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Re: A Spoonful of Sugar.......

Or the pipped variety, is not fit for human consumption
Another mis-guided phrase
If it is not fit for human consumption, then it is not fit for animal consumption
Infinity
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Re: A Spoonful of Sugar.......

UK government scientists are reviewing the amount of added sugar people should eat each day.
The current guideline has a limit of 10-11%.
The World Health Organization said people should aim to get just 5% of their daily calories from the sweet stuff.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-27941325

A long delayed report is due out today (Thursday)
The Government’s scientific advisory committee on nutrition will publish guidelines on sugar limits.
WTF
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Re: A Spoonful of Sugar.......

There was something about this on Radio 4 this morning that mentioned the 'controversy' over whether sugar contributes to obesity.
That would be 'controversy' in the climate change 'controversy' sense: the evidence is overwhelming, the facts are undisputable but the wilfully ignorant still have their fingers in their ears and are singing "lalala" Roll eyes
Prepared 'food' (I use the term loosely) manufacturers have fought tooth and nail against voluntary reductions in fat, sugar, salt and plastics (=transfat) in their products.  Despite years of pressure (two decades in the case of transfats), they have only reluctantly made the tiniest possible changes.  Voluntary action simply hasn't worked and the threat has always been: change voluntarily or face regulation.  Regulation is therefore long over-due.
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Re: A Spoonful of Sugar.......

from the link
Quote
What are current guidelines?
Sugar is sugar - right? Not quite. Health professionals take a dim view of sugars added to processed food but say that naturally occurring sweetness in milk and fruit is largely fine, with the exception of juice.
Current advice says no more than 11% of a person's daily food calories should come from added sugars, or 10% once alcohol is taken into account. 
The problem is that the previous headlines in the media covered all sugar with bananas being cited as a really bad idea
I found this site http://www.sugarstacks.com/fruits.htm
While I can understand all those rubbish drinks with absolutely masses of sugar some of which are actually marketed as healthy but I don't understand the difference between pure orange juice and oranges
From this report http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2301135/15-WORST-health-drinks-Orange-juice-Innocent-smoot... half a litre of pure orange juice contains 51g of sugar whereas from the previous link 270g of orange contains 23g of sugar. So a normal glass of orange juice isn't much different from a whole orange
So basically the drinking of fruit juice isn't much different from eating fruit EXCEPT it is a whole lot easier to drink a lot of juice than to eat a lot of oranges
Taking the report from the BBC
Too much sugar definitely contributes to obesity but so does eating too much of anything
The one part I definitely agree with is trying to do something about young children being given large amounts of sugary drinks but that can only be done by education
Going back in the mists of time (well I am a bit ancient) adding numerous spoons of sugar to tea was considered perfectly normal and as they were usually heaped teaspoons that is about 7g per teaspoon
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Re: A Spoonful of Sugar.......

I'm sure sugar can contribute to obesity but so can any food if taken to excess or not part of a balanced diet along with exercise.
I have always had a sweet tooth and suffer a starter and main course to get to the sweet. I love lashings of sugar on my strawberries with lots of cream. Bowl of cornflakes with sugar sprinkled on top, rice pudding with lots of shortbread biscuits... No government policy will encourage me to change what I enjoy. At 6' 4" and around 10.5 st I am most definitely not obese.
As a child I was always tall and slim yet ate a hearty breakfast before school, with sandwiches mid-morning, school dinner (usually with seconds), evening meal and a snack later. I had sugary drinks (not cola), plenty of chocolate but I also had lots of exercise both at school and home. Back in the 60's and 70's there weren't 24 hour TV channels to sit glued to or computer/games consoles to lounge in front of. We went out, made our own entertainment and had fun. If we wanted to speak to our friends we got off our backsides and visited them.
The statistics may show a link between sugar and obesity but I fear there is much more to it than that. Do we want the government meddling in our lives even further telling us what we can/should have/do?

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Re: A Spoonful of Sugar.......

Quote from: Oldjim
So basically the drinking of fruit juice isn't much different from eating fruit EXCEPT it is a whole lot easier to drink a lot of juice than to eat a lot of oranges

Apparently, the difference is that the whole fruit contains fibre which (somehow, don't ask me how) counterbalances some of the sugars.
Quote from: Oldjim
The one part I definitely agree with is trying to do something about young children being given large amounts of sugary drinks but that can only be done by education

They're kids: surely you can just stop giving them the garbage  Undecided
Quote from: Oldjim
Going back in the mists of time (well I am a bit ancient) adding numerous spoons of sugar to tea was considered perfectly normal and as they were usually heaped teaspoons that is about 7g per teaspoon

True, but that still doesn't really compare to something like Coke or Lilt or whatever.  Making them was once described to me (by someone who knew) as: add a shedload of sugar, add water, add a boatload sugar, add flavouring, add a bucketload of sugar etc ..
Quote from: Oldjim
I'm sure sugar can contribute to obesity but so can any food if taken to excess or not part of a balanced diet along with exercise

The thing is that processed sugars like HFCS - which is what we're actually talking about here - have virtually zero value as food other than as a source of calories.  No balanced diet would ever include them.
Quote from: Mav
Do we want the government meddling in our lives even further telling us what we can/should have/do?

Another way of looking at it is: do we want the government to allow companies to meddle with our health even further, forcing us to do what suits them?
That is the actual alternatve - i.e. the status quo.  There is no alternative where we're given a free, fully and truthfully informed choice.
Pleas for freedom from control sound great and are very appealing but sadly, they have zero chance of happening.
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Re: A Spoonful of Sugar.......

re education - I meant educate the parents
re sugar and fibre
checking the glycemic index and there  isn't much difference
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Re: A Spoonful of Sugar.......

As a young lad I would have 3 teaspoons of sugar in a cup of tea, plenty of fizzy drinks such as Tizer, Cream Soda,  sweets, crisps and all the usual stuff children eat but have never been overweight at any time in my life, I did cut down on the Tizer and sweets later in life but replaced them with Wine & Beer.
Yes I  do eat a fair amount of fruit, biscuits, chocolate and have never put on weight so is it a case of listening to the experts and then doing the opposite ?