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30ºC, 40ºC, 60ºC, 90ºC. Washing machine temperatures.

Infinity
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30ºC, 40ºC, 60ºC, 90ºC. Washing machine temperatures.

Add a pinch of salt...
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2398775/30-C-laundry-cycles-breed-bacteria-transfer-germs-...

My washable items don't tend to get dirty, so it's 30ºC for most of my things.
Nice short 40 minutes wash, plus extra spin too.
A kitchen timer set to 60 minutes reminds me my very quiet washer in the utility room has finished its wash cycle.
The washing is then hung outside to dry whenever possible.
No Tumble Dryer, got to consider Global Warming !!
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198kHz
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Re: 30ºC, 40ºC, 60ºC, 90ºC. Washing machine temperatures.

Gosh, that's terrifying. It probably lowers house prices too.  Wink
Not young enough to know everything
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Re: 30ºC, 40ºC, 60ºC, 90ºC. Washing machine temperatures.

Recommended machine wash temperatures are set by British Standards, the textile industry with the wash medium chemical industry not by the machine manufacturers. The machine manufacturers may well pick up all the kudos and plaudits of reducing energy etc. but they're only conforming to what the fabric and powder makers tell them.
Different powders and tabs etc. are designed to release different chemicals at different temperatures, proborate bleaches don't work below 70degC for instance (for whites washes) persistently washing fabrics below the recommended temperatures will lead to fading of colours and general greying of light colours and white.
Strictly speaking washing should be sorted by temperature requirement, but very few people do (including us) which will lead to a lot more wash cycles.
Catch 22. .   
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Infinity
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Re: 30ºC, 40ºC, 60ºC, 90ºC. Washing machine temperatures.

I did notice the article didn't really mention that you don't just use water, but washing powder too, which will have some anti-bacterial properties.
Most contain a detergent, and bleaching agents.
The manufacturers websites probably go into more detail on this.
The Persil Bio I use states it works down to 15ºC, for stain removal anyway.
Horses for courses.
And drying in Sunlight does the same I gather.

Midnight_Caller
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Re: 30ºC, 40ºC, 60ºC, 90ºC. Washing machine temperatures.

I think anti bacterial this and anti germ that is the thing that is making people ill! We all need exposure to bugs as they help build up our immunity.
Infinity
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Re: 30ºC, 40ºC, 60ºC, 90ºC. Washing machine temperatures.

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Re: 30ºC, 40ºC, 60ºC, 90ºC. Washing machine temperatures.

I thought this was good Grin
Quote
30c is actually the temperature in which we incubate bugs to grow them for our experiments
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Infinity
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Re: 30ºC, 40ºC, 60ºC, 90ºC. Washing machine temperatures.

Daily Mail today...
Washing your clothes at 40ºC may be better for the environment but it does not kill the majority of bacteria, new research shows.
Laundry done at this temperature has only 14% fewer germs, tests reveal
One in four items of clothing washed at 40ºC contain faecal bacteria
Children's cuddly toys and baby grows contain the most faecal bacteria and toddlers' underwear contains the most bacteria overall
To reduce bacteria, wash clothes at 60ºC or higher or use a laundry disinfectant

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2448418/Laundry-washed-40c-14-fewer-germs.html#ixzz2h2Gb8k...
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Re: 30ºC, 40ºC, 60ºC, 90ºC. Washing machine temperatures.

Being a matelot, many years ago, we used to do all our dhobying in a bucket full of hot water and a cup full of washing power..... leave it until it got cold, then rinse out and dry.... everything came out perfectly... yes, we did sort the coloureds from the whites.... whites were white and coloureds (usually blue)... were blue...
Since those days, I have used the same technique in my home life, with bigger buckets !... until recently... when my missus insisted we get a decent washing machine, AND a tumble dryer...
Life is so much easier now !  Cheesy
My black trousers get a short 30 minute wash, with minimal amount of washing powder... ( BIOLOGICAL is good)... and the rest, including shirts, go on the 90 degree 2 hour cycle....1200 spin speed
gets the same result as original bucket wash..... but with less hassle....  and 30 mins in the TUMBLE DRIER means I can iron the stuff straight away... and not have to watch for rain, or wait for hours ( next day) to be able to complete the task....
All this twaddle about the environment, and saving energy, is a government con.... to get more money into the coffers under a different tax name.... think about it.... how much money has been raised by government under the pretext of Carbon Footprint.... Energy tax to protect the environment, or whatever.....
has the environment changed? NO ...
so what happened to all that money? 
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Re: 30ºC, 40ºC, 60ºC, 90ºC. Washing machine temperatures.

Quote from: PlusComUK
Daily Mail today...
Washing your clothes at 40ºC may be better for the environment but it does not kill the majority of bacteria

I'll bet they hate most of us now who wash at 30 or 40 - they probably think we're all dirt (oh hang on, they already did!)
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Re: 30ºC, 40ºC, 60ºC, 90ºC. Washing machine temperatures.

We found that by constantly using lower temperatures the washing machine would give off an unpleasant odour, by using higher temperatures this has stopped !
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Re: 30ºC, 40ºC, 60ºC, 90ºC. Washing machine temperatures.

Here's me trying to get my energy bill below £1000 per year and I'm getting encouraged to wash on a hotter cycle and use a tumble dryer Shocked
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alanf
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Re: 30ºC, 40ºC, 60ºC, 90ºC. Washing machine temperatures.

An expert was asked about this on a radio programme that I cannot now recall the name of. He mention that a lot of bugs will survive even the higher temperatures and the main reason that clothes become more hygienic  in the wash is that the detergent and agitation dislodge the bacteria.
It is recommended that a very hot wash should be done once in a while to stop nasties building up in the washing machine itself.
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Re: 30ºC, 40ºC, 60ºC, 90ºC. Washing machine temperatures.

Ultimately unless you boil the hell out of your clothes with boiling water from the kettle, you can't be sure of killing any germs. It's that simple.
Water boils at 100C. A 30-40C wash is simply like a hot summers day. Germs are known to survive well and even breed in heat.
What do you think will happen to the germs in your clothes? - There will always be rogues that don't get killed and will start multiplying again.
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VileReynard
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Re: 30ºC, 40ºC, 60ºC, 90ºC. Washing machine temperatures.

Quote
Although no hyperthermophile has yet been discovered living at temperatures above 122°C, their existence is very possible (Strain 121 survived being heated to 130°C for two hours,
but was not able to reproduce until it had been transferred into a fresh growth medium, at a relatively cooler 103°C).
However, it is thought unlikely that microbes could survive at temperatures above 150°C, as the cohesion of DNA and other vital molecules begins to break down at this point.