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28 Days!

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Registered: 06-04-2007

28 Days!

It seems it will take up to 28 days for a refund from HotPoint (Indesit) to reach my credit card having paid them £109.99 on Monday 2nd to come out the following Friday but cancelling 2 days later.
That seems extraordinarily excessive. Not sure whether Section 75 of the Consumer Credit Act will cover me on this one. Nothing I've read so far indicates it would Angry
Not sure whether I'd be charged interest by the credit card company either.

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3 REPLIES
Community Veteran
Posts: 5,346
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Registered: 23-09-2010

Re: 28 Days!

The return elastic always seems much weaker than the one on the paying in side.
Community Veteran
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Registered: 02-08-2007

Re: 28 Days!

Not sure if this is now Law as the article does not make it that clear but take a look at this,
http://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/index/pressoffice/press_index/press_2014051302.htm
Community Veteran
Posts: 5,346
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Registered: 23-09-2010

Re: 28 Days!

That does seem better but 14 days is still too long and what exactly will happen to any firms that don't toe the line?
Nothing probably except maybe "a stern talking to" and I expect those 14 days will be "working days".
How does that time stretching excuse work when nowadays for many businesses it's a seven day week?
Quote
The Consumer Rights Directive, which comes into force across Europe on Friday (13 June), kick-starts the first of these, with changes including an extension from seven to 14 days of the period a buyer has to cancel an online order. Refunds must also be given within 14 days of returning goods.
The UK’s Consumer Rights Bill, set to become law this year, goes further still. In the biggest shake-up of consumer law in decades, it will consolidate eight existing pieces of legislation, including the Sale of Goods Act 1979 and the Unfair Terms in Consumer Contracts Regulations 1999.