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2020

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Hero
Posts: 4,714
Thanks: 871
Fixes: 8
Registered: ‎31-07-2007

Re: 2020


@RobPN wrote:

@DaveyH wrote:

Its more like 1920 with all this talk of ...


Don't mention the war.

I bought a full size alloy wheel from Germany on eBay yesterday (to replace the space-saver-spare presently in my car) using a credit card, something which I don't think would have even been dreamt of in 1920.


@RobPN  I doubt, if back then unless you were very rich you'd have a bank account, as this extract from a 2013 DT item shows:

In 1778, Royal Bank of Scotland invented the overdraft. 
The bank allowed William Hog, a merchant, to take £1,000
 (the equivalent of £63,664 today) more out of his account 
than he had in it.

In those times, bank accounts were a luxury for the rich,
 something that didn't change for more than 200 years.
 At the beginning of the millennium, nearly a quarter of 
low–income households didn't have a current account, but
 that is down to just 4pc today.

Has all this change been an improvement without snags? I'd give a qualified 'yes. It has helped trade and other things, but also impersonalisation and there are some who now have bank accounts, who are a PITB to their banks. Cash only would be much safer for them.😈

 

2020 I suggest what is needed is a non ophthalmological 2020 vision. Wink 

No one has to agree with my opinion, but in the time I have left a miracle would be nice.
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Aspiring Legend
Posts: 11,769
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Registered: ‎04-11-2014

Re: 2020

It was not until the mid 60s that I had a bank account and only then because the company I worked for gave notice that they would no longer be paying our wages in cash. Also, up until then money was sent either as a postal order or received as my Dad's wages were back in the late 50s (he worked away from home) by way of cash recorded delivery in a canvas type envelope. I seem to remember it had a green wax seal on the back of it.

As for cheque books, they were not for the likes of us plebs living on Council house estates and if one was received, with no bank account you'd have to find someone like a tradesman to cash it for you.

No need to go back to the 1920s.

Blimey, whatever next!

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Seasoned Champion
Posts: 1,804
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Registered: ‎21-11-2018

Re: 2020


@RobPN wrote:


Which is also good to use at the beginning of computer filenames (although yyyymmdd is better) so that they're sorted chronologically, e.g when conducting a legal case.  Cool  Thumbs_Up


For many years now I have prefixed my filenames ( and all my PDF document scans ) with the date of the day they were created -- eg. 2019-12-30

I know you can sort files by date in file manager but having it as part of the filename is IMHO much better..

 

If I write a cheque ( hardly ever these days ) I also put a line after the amount and the date to fill any blank area, and when I had to make out purchase orders as part of my job I used to put a line ( or on a computer a line of dashes ) under the last item on the order to signify that there were no other items on the order.....

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Moderator
Moderator
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Registered: ‎14-04-2007

Re: 2020

I have a Pakistani and a Sri Lankan to thank for my bank / building society accounts.

Customer and Forum Moderator. Windows 10 Firefox 79.0 (64-bit)

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Hero
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Registered: ‎05-09-2016

Re: 2020

@Luzern, I wouldn't agree with that article's claim that bank accounts were a luxury for the rich until after 1978.  I opened my first current account in 1973, and had held savings accounts with the Post Office before then.  I remember that I had to be introduced by an existing customer of the bank though.

Since the article was written as recently as 2013, I assume it was penned by one of those young people one sees 'presenting' on TV, who talk about the 1980s as if they were the dark ages.  The only things I wish we'd had when I was young are the internet and cheap flights.

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Hero
Posts: 4,714
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Registered: ‎31-07-2007

Re: 2020

@Jonpe  You're probably right.:), but the timing of the expansion of employers going over to recommending employees for accounts was in the mid seventies at the branch I worked.

The 'new' customers were a very mixed blessing.

No one has to agree with my opinion, but in the time I have left a miracle would be nice.
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Aspiring Legend
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Registered: ‎04-11-2014

Re: 2020

I used to say that if I made it passed fifty without a serious illness (despite more than a couple of close call accidents) I'd be more happy and now, well now I've made it a good nudge passed seventy with just a hiccup into 2020.

My family are all well, we are all still together so what more can anybody ask out of life.

Wishing you all a happy and if not prosperous, then a healthy next year.

Right, now where did I leave that bottle of Irish.... cheers all. 🙂