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Gigabit Fibre

bigladuk
Grafter
Posts: 114
Registered: 03-08-2010

Gigabit Fibre

I know I've raised this subject before and I love my 330mb but when is a 1000mb  service going to be available to FTTP customers who clearly have the right hardware ready to make use of it
There are loads of stories all over the net about new housing developments getting it and some towns getting it so why or when can the FTTP customers be offered it ?
yeah I know I'm greedy but 330 is such an odd number, 1000 is much nicer  Crazy
Si
9 REPLIES
pwatson
Rising Star
Posts: 2,468
Thanks: 7
Fixes: 1
Registered: 26-11-2012

Re: Gigabit Fibre

This can't happen until BT Wholesale make it available as a product - Any ares that have a gigabit service already are not supplied by BT...
What router do you have by the way, and can it handle a throughput of 1Gb/s?
bigladuk
Grafter
Posts: 114
Registered: 03-08-2010

Re: Gigabit Fibre

I rock an Apple Airport Extreme with a Gigabit WAN port and 3 Gigabit LAN ports that pass to my 8 port Gigabit managed switch
I'm ready for Gigabit  Cheesy
Si
pwatson
Rising Star
Posts: 2,468
Thanks: 7
Fixes: 1
Registered: 26-11-2012

Re: Gigabit Fibre

bigladuk
Grafter
Posts: 114
Registered: 03-08-2010

Re: Gigabit Fibre

Mine is 5th Gen ( I think ) so I guess the answer to your previous question is no LOL
TBH if I get 1000mb I'd use my Server as a firewall and bring the internet in via one of the NICs, that has the best chance of getting me close to max
Si
Community Veteran
Posts: 6,818
Registered: 27-10-2012

Re: Gigabit Fibre

BT use a passive network for FTTP (also known as GPON).
The fibre feed from the aggregation node goes to a splitter tray (known as SASA I think) which serves 32 homes or premises - i.e. fibre cable comes in with one strand and is then split 32 ways. These 32 fibres are spliced and link to the nearest distribution point and then this is where they blow the fibre into your house.
GPON has limitations. At the moment there is a downstream capacity of 2.488 Gb/s and an upstream capacity of 1.244 Gbp/s. So essentially 32 homes are sharing that capacity, which works out around 76.5/38.875 Mb/s per house. Obviously BT will have done their calculations to make sure that the speed variants they offer will be able to cope with the shared capacity.
I highly doubt we will see anything faster than 330/30 for a while with Openreach. There just isn't the commercial need for such a product that will be used domestically.
GPON is the best way to install FTTH/P on a large scale at the moment (the other alternative would be for each house to have a fibre that is individually connected back to the exchange - imagine doing that for 10,000 homes!). The beauty of fibre is that it can carry an unlimited amount of bandwidth over long distances without the signal losses that affect copper. The only limitation is the equipment supplying and delivering the fibre.
I believe Google are using the next generation of fibre access in the US known as WDM PON. This uses a similar structure to GPON, but uses lightwaves over different wavelengths.
bigladuk
Grafter
Posts: 114
Registered: 03-08-2010

Re: Gigabit Fibre

Wow, thanks Andy
bigladuk
Grafter
Posts: 114
Registered: 03-08-2010

Re: Gigabit Fibre

WOW 10Gigabit
Community Veteran
Posts: 6,818
Registered: 27-10-2012

Re: Gigabit Fibre

Fibre can carry data at ridiculous speeds. Alcatel broke the speed record recently by transferring data at 31Tbps over a single fibre cable.
Google summarise why with their 1Gig fibre, speeds will still vary:
Quote
Another thing to consider is that all points on the Internet between Google Fiber's network and the website you visit (including speed test websites) do not necessarily run at 1Gig. Even if our Fiber network and your devices are fully capable of achieving 1Gig speeds, Google cannot ensure that you will receive 1Gig speeds from end to end. Once your communication leaves the Fiber network, it might encounter segments of the Internet providing slower service—often due to heavy traffic or substantial rerouting delays—at any time. It is our hope that overall Internet performance will improve over time.