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Block Wifi at Night - Using Router Plusnet Safe Guard or another method?

craigcc
Newbie
Posts: 7
Thanks: 2
Registered: 10-02-2016

Block Wifi at Night - Using Router Plusnet Safe Guard or another method?

Hi All,
Just signed up to PlusNet, using their Router. Using Fibre. The whole family are enjoying the speedy access.
The recommendation is to leave the router on 24/7 which is fine.
However, I'd like to be able to block wifi at night between the hours of 10PM and 8AM - just to avoid those young red eyes in the morning and late school starts.
So a few questions if you can help:

  • Can I block wireless access to the whole house? If so do I need to using the router or can I use the PlusNet safe guard?

  • Can I block wireless access per device? If so do I need to do this using the router or can I use the PlusNet safeguard tool?


Any tips would be appreciated, sure I'm not the first house that has this need. A switch on the router would be ideal, but pretty sure it doesn't have one.
Many thanks in advance
Craig
17 REPLIES
brookheather
Rising Star
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Registered: 02-02-2016

Re: Block Wifi at Night - Using Router Plusnet Safe Guard or another method?

Yes you can block individual wired and wireless devices by using the Access Control feature on your router.  You will need to find the MAC address for any device you wish to block and then on the Access Control screen you just select the device and the allowed time to access the internet.  You may also need to restrict Admin rights on your children PCs so that they can't spoof the MAC address to bypass your access controls - depends on whether they are old enough to work out how to do that.
Community Veteran
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Registered: 24-10-2013

Re: Block Wifi at Night - Using Router Plusnet Safe Guard or another method?

of course, it won't stop them using the devices though. all it'll do is stop the devices being able to connect to the internet.
suitable parenting skills should be enough to deal with this without having to start restricting access on a per device level.
jafreer
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Registered: 13-10-2012

Re: Block Wifi at Night - Using Router Plusnet Safe Guard or another method?

The question wasn't about parenting skills, but a technical question. Best to keep the thread on topic.
craigcc
Newbie
Posts: 7
Thanks: 2
Registered: 10-02-2016

Re: Block Wifi at Night - Using Router Plusnet Safe Guard or another method?

Thanks for your advice Heather, will take a good look at router settings tonight.
I've googled around and it does seem that the router setting is the way  to go, just a bit of a pain loging into the router each night. Also found a useful little app called Fing for android which allows you to monitor devices/MAC address without loging into router.
Don't worry about the parenting advice, I wont bite  Lips are sealed  Smiley
brookheather
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Registered: 02-02-2016

Re: Block Wifi at Night - Using Router Plusnet Safe Guard or another method?

Not sure what you mean about logging into the router each night?  You just set the on/off times once - you don't need to log back in again unless you need to change the times.  Unfortunately you can't set different times for weekdays/weekends etc.
mav:quote
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Re: Block Wifi at Night - Using Router Plusnet Safe Guard or another method?

Quote from: jafreer
The question wasn't about parenting skills, but a technical question. Best to keep the thread on topic.

the technical point being it wouldn't stop the devices being used, just stop internet access.
and what did your post contribute to the thread?
craigcc
Newbie
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Registered: 10-02-2016

Re: Block Wifi at Night - Using Router Plusnet Safe Guard or another method?

Ahhh Heather, thanks.
I didn't realize you could set times, that sounds perfect.
will dig around tonight.
Kind Regards
Craig
Community Veteran
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Registered: 24-10-2013

Re: Block Wifi at Night - Using Router Plusnet Safe Guard or another method?

remember that mac address is per device, so if any new devices are added then those would also need to be specifically included (or not).
Andrue
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Re: Block Wifi at Night - Using Router Plusnet Safe Guard or another method?

Buy a timer and have the router powered off overnight. It won't bother DLM and will save a bit of money and reduce the (slight) risk of a fire.
Community Veteran
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Re: Block Wifi at Night - Using Router Plusnet Safe Guard or another method?

i would say that is poor advice to give.
1) to say it won't bother DLM is misleading. it may eventually "bother" DLM
2) constant turning off and on may lead to premature failure of the router
3) powering the router off would stop ALL devices having access, not just the childrens devices.
Andrue
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Re: Block Wifi at Night - Using Router Plusnet Safe Guard or another method?

Quote from: chenks76
1) to say it won't bother DLM is misleading. it may eventually "bother" DLM
No, it won't. We know enough about DLM to be absolutely certain that turning the modem off overnight will not trigger a DLM response.
Quote
2) constant turning off and on may lead to premature failure of the router
Unlikely. I've been doing that for all my low power equipment for years now and this Monday's switch failure is the first of any kind that I have known.
Quote
3) powering the router off would stop ALL devices having access, not just the childrens devices.
Yes, that much is true.
craigcc
Newbie
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Registered: 10-02-2016

Re: Block Wifi at Night - Using Router Plusnet Safe Guard or another method?

Thanks again, some interesting responses.
The settings are indeed per device, but once the devices are named it easy to identify who has access and which ones to exclude at night during sleeping hours.
To be honest, I had an old ADSL router and used to turn it off every night. I didn't get any speed issues. I just noticed that Plusnet were very specific about leaving the router on 24/7 when using fibre. Hence the questions.
Personally, I'd rather turn it off at night. That said, the plusnet one router doesn't get hot like previous routers I've owned.
So far so good with everything else, so thanks all!
Craig
Community Veteran
Posts: 18
Registered: 09-09-2015

Re: Block Wifi at Night - Using Router Plusnet Safe Guard or another method?

I have done exactly this (restricting the kids internet access on their devices at night), via a firewall rule on a time schedule in the router.  I am using my own model router.
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Re: Block Wifi at Night - Using Router Plusnet Safe Guard or another method?

Quote from: Andrue
Quote from: chenks76
1) to say it won't bother DLM is misleading. it may eventually "bother" DLM
No, it won't. We know enough about DLM to be absolutely certain that turning the modem off overnight will not trigger a DLM response.
Quote
2) constant turning off and on may lead to premature failure of the router
Unlikely. I've been doing that for all my low power equipment for years now and this Monday's switch failure is the first of any kind that I have known.
Quote
3) powering the router off would stop ALL devices having access, not just the childrens devices.
Yes, that much is true.

Actually chaps you are both partly right and partly wrong. Taking the points in reverse order -
3) Obviously when it's off, no-one has access, but parents (or others by permission) may want access later than the children.
2) Turning things on and off does stress components and is more likely to cause earlier failure than if there is no switching.
However, a lot of modern equipment is designed to be "soft-start" so there aren't the same surges that you might otherwise get. That unfortunately isn't true of a lot of "budget" devices, and generally it's only "designed in" to more complex items of equipment such as TV sets etc. and a lot also depends on the quality of components used in the first place.
Then there's a trade off between how long the equipment is on and being used. The failure rate of components depends on not only how long they are powered up, but also how much margin there is within their design parameters - eg. maximum power ratings, temperature limits etc. A component used nearer it's maximum limits is more highly stressed and therefore likely to fail sooner. Sometimes the failure rate for the equipment due to switching is much lower than the failure rate due to it being powered 24/7 and there isn't always any way of being certain. How physically hot a piece of equipment runs is certainly one indicator.
It all contributes to the overall Reliability (or MTBF if you prefer).
1) Switching off overnight - always a thorny issue. It's important to distinguish whether one is talking about a combined modem/router or just a router - too many use the generic term router when it's actually a modem/router. Turning off a separate router should not be an issue. If the modem is maintaining sync, DLM doesn't even enter the picture.
So for combined modem/routers and separate modems, it firstly can depend on how many errors you get on your connection - most users won't know unless they have access to the detailed stats (and understand them), nor is it normally possible for a user to know whether DLM regards a particular combination of say errors and noise margins as being critical so that one other (undesirable) event causes it to act. A loss of sync (by switching off) might be such a trigger in some circumstances.
Then there's the length of the connection (to the Cab for Fibre, exchange for ADSL) and how much the overall noise margins vary through the 24hrs. Longer lines, especially if they are overhead, and significantly more so on ADSL, can suffer a lot more noise from dusk to daylight. A very small number of lines may have more noise in the day due to the local environment.
So it's not just so much the turning off to consider, it's when you turn it back on again. If noise levels are high, the sync speed will always be lower because the Target Noise Margin will always be maintained at the point of sync.
The trick with longer ADSL lines was to sync during the day to get the best sync speed. Some lines are awkward in that the SNRM then goes too low at night and the connection drops and a resync is usually at a much slower speed. It then a bit hit and miss to find the best time to resync to get a happy balance between speed and least chance of a dropped connection. Thankfully Fibre isn't usually quite as critical.
However, remember, on Fibre, if DLM does act, it can increase latency or band speed etc and it can take some considerable time (weeks) sometimes before it will reverse such action if the line is otherwise ok.  ISPs don't have the ability to do a line reset on Fibre as they do on ADSL.
Generally speaking, the best advise is to leave the modem or combined modem/router switched on unless you are very close to the exchange or Cab for Fibre, when you'll probably get away with switching it off without any consequence if you wish to do so, if your line has no other issues.