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Another fibre training question

chorlton_w
Newbie
Posts: 4
Registered: 10-03-2017

Another fibre training question

If sync speed settings are only established when the router is rebooted, how does the 'new connection training period' stress test the connection speed if we are instructed to leave the router on throughout the 10 day period?

My router has been on the exact same upstream/downstream sync speeds for the past 4 days.
10 REPLIES
Community Veteran
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Registered: 10-06-2010

Re: Another fibre training question

There is no 10-day training period on FTTC. The Dynamic Line Management (DLM) system is always monitoring the performance of the line, and the DLM can trigger a re-sync whenever it wants.

chorlton_w
Newbie
Posts: 4
Registered: 10-03-2017

Re: Another fibre training question

DLM for FTTC and no 10d training period? That's somewhat contrary to all have have read and have been told, including the FAQ on the PN website and by PN on Twitter. Is that in every exchange?
Community Veteran
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Re: Another fibre training question

What have you been reading?

https://www.plus.net/home-broadband/faqs/fibre-optic-broadband/

4. Will speeds go up and down?

Yes, fibre broadband uses the same technology (Dynamic Line Management) as standard broadband to give you the best possible service.

You'll probably see your speed vary over the first 10 days, as the broadband system runs tests to find the best speed for your service. This can cause your speeds to go up and down. You may even get disconnected a few times. Don't worry, this doesn't mean there's a problem, so please bear with it.

Your speed may vary over the first 10 days, and at any other time after then as conditions affecting your line change. I don't think the DLM really runs any tests as such. It monitors the line's performance (in terms of error rate and the number of disconnections), and then may adjust settings (the amount of error protection, capping the speed) based on its observations.

It's largely the same everywhere, although the cabinets made are by two different companies (Huawei and ECI), and they don't have the same things currently available.

What speeds are you getting, and what are your estimated speeds (from the BTWholesale availability checker)?

rongtw
Seasoned Hero
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Registered: 01-12-2010

Re: Another fibre training question

despite what PN web page says

On the first day of operation, DLM will intervene if severe instability is detected.
Otherwise, DLM will wait until the day after provision before intervening, provided
that the line has been trained up for at least 15 minutes during the preceding day. Thumbs Up

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jafreer
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Re: Another fibre training question

rongtw is correct. Even referring to '10 days' is meaningless on fibre. You go on an open profile for 2 days and DLM will only act if there are severe problems. You are likely to see your fastest speeds at this time.

DLM can act at any time, so even mentioning 10 days is pointless. DLM can act from day 1 onwards.

chorlton_w
Newbie
Posts: 4
Registered: 10-03-2017

Re: Another fibre training question

I'm currently getting less than estimated on Fibre Extra: 37 Mbps vs. The 40-53 Mbps at sign-up. Upstream is about 6.7 Mbps and has been stable, but downstream reached 42 Mbps in the first few days with no obvious issues.

Yes, plugged straight into the Master socket albeit via a filter (using as a BT to RJ11 adapter).
Community Veteran
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Re: Another fibre training question

Do you have a test socket? Are there any other sockets?

Another thing wrong with a lot of the guides is the advice that it's best to use the master socket. Plugging into the master socket will not solve the problem of having extension sockets without a filtered faceplate. Accessing the test socket, however, disconnects all the extension wiring.

chorlton_w
Newbie
Posts: 4
Registered: 10-03-2017

Re: Another fibre training question

Why do filtered extension sockets need to be used if nothing is plugged in to them? Again, a lot of ambiguous advise on this - I wish there was one, authorative version of the truth on all these aspects!
Community Veteran
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Re: Another fibre training question

It's rather complicated, but the problem is that the broadband signals are reflected around the unused wires, the effect is known as a "bridged tap".

Getting speeds in the B range can be due to having internal wiring, the solution is either disconnect the extension sockets, or get a filtered faceplate. A filter works by blocking the broadband signals from the phone sockets (and providing an unfiltered socket to connect the modem to). So with a filtered faceplate at the master socket, it prevents the broadband signals going around the extension wiring.

jafreer
Aspiring Pro
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Re: Another fibre training question

I think if nothing is plugged into an extension socket, then it won't matter if it has a filter connected or not. If you are going to connect a phone to it, then obviously you need a filter.

A central filter is best though, at the master socket. That way filtering is done at the earliest opportunity and you don't have VDSL signals flying all around your extension wiring. I always think that if you are using microfilters on fibre and you have one or more extensions in the house, then switch to a filtered faceplate. It is even preferable to run a separate twisted pair cable to your modem if it can't be at the master socket.