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gigabit ethernet

Patch
Grafter
Posts: 122
Registered: 30-07-2007

gigabit ethernet

This is probably a silly question but....

we have a small network of about 10 pc in the office all connected on a peer to peer network on 10/100 ethernet. One of the computers runs the mail server software, and also hosts the companies intranet.

I was just wondering if we were to get a new computer to manage all the company's email and intranet, and this new computer had a gigabit ethernet interface, would the gigabit connection work with the rest of the network? Or would the gigabit network card simply slow down to run at the same speed as the rest of the network?

I am just trying to think where bottle necks might occur, and this seems to be a possible restriction.

I appreciate we would need to ugrade the network switch as well.

Many thanks

Patch
9 REPLIES
N/A

gigabit ethernet

the transfer on all 10 computers would still remain at 10/100, however, if you dont mind investing 150quid, you could get a nice shiny new 1g network card for each pc?Huh
Patch
Grafter
Posts: 122
Registered: 30-07-2007

gigabit ethernet

That's an interesting thought robynfali! I had not realised they were so cheap.

But in the mean time, just to get it straight in my head... if 2 of the computers (with 10/100 cards) were accessing the mail computer, and downloading emails, would they both be able to achieve full 100mb speed.

In my mind it seems that in this situation, the 2 computers drawing on the one server would get a speed of 50 each, my logic being that 50+50 =100 (so the server would be the restriction). But if that server had a gigabit ethernet card, then those 2 computers would both get a speed of 100, as 100+100 = 200 which is well below capacity of the gigabit card.

does this make sense?

Patch
N/A

gigabit ethernet

You should find that all the computers get their full capacity, IDEALLY!!, 10 computers with 100 = 1gb, it may not work like that, and I imagine that your not going to have all ten transferring at the same time, but yeah, they should easily hit 100 if a few going at the same time



EDIT

SLIGHTLY wrong with the price £17.58 inc VAT

Ebuyer
Patch
Grafter
Posts: 122
Registered: 30-07-2007

gigabit ethernet

Great, thanks for helping clear that up for me.

time to go shopping!
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gigabit ethernet

only glad I could help mate
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gigabit ethernet

Depending what type of switch you have now, you may achieve the 100MBs connection an all other machines, however if you have a hub as opposed to a switch, you may find you get a bit of a bottleneck - since all packets are sent to all ports on a hub. (A Switch knows where each packet should go, so it sends it in the right direction - they also have much better backplanes which allow faster throughput)
Also, if the 1000MB NIC is plugged into a 100MB port, it will auto sense the lower speed, and just operate at that speed.
Having said all that, its pretty difficult in a normal office situation, to max out a 100MBs ethernet connection - even transferring pretty large files around our network for backups we don't find much of an issue.
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gigabit ethernet

to be fair all you would really need is one gigabit port on a switch and the server connected to that, and all the clients running on 10/100 cards to 10/100 ports on the switch.
The_10th
Grafter
Posts: 1,090
Registered: 08-04-2007

gigabit ethernet

As 'sallyandjames' has stated - 1Gbps card (2Gbps full duplex, i.e. send and receive data in same time frame) is the total amount of data in one direction at a given moment in time. Many servers run 1Gig cards serving hundreds of users on 10Mbps/100Mbps NICs as not all users will be accessing the server at the same time (same sort of philosophy as Statistical Multiplexing Zzzzz...). You will of course experience periods of high activity in these scenarios which can make the network seem a little sluggish but this is to be expected.

The important point to note is that a switch is a requirement as a hub acts the same as one long data cable running from one machine to the next and THIS would be your 'bottleneck'. Each port on a switch operates on its own collision domain (i.e. where contention/collision of data traffic can occur) and when using a switch don't be tempted to run a hub off it but instead use a switch with more than enough ports in the first place. Don't forget to ensure the switch has a Gigabit port!

1Gbps not 1GBps (1 gigaBIT per sec as opposed to 1 gigaBYTE per sec , fussy but the later implies data at 8 x the stated rate, i.e 8Gbps Smiley
Patch
Grafter
Posts: 122
Registered: 30-07-2007

gigabit ethernet

Thanks all, and thanks Nolans for the info on Gbps vs GBps. You probably noticed from my original post that I had left all these out. As I was typing my post I suddenly realised I had no idea how it should be, so tried to avod the whole issue.

I felt sure someone would enlighten me Cheesy

Thanks all,

Patch