cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

debian

Community Veteran
Posts: 1,236
Registered: 02-08-2007

debian

I have decided to change from Fedora to Debian for my Linux server.
After using my laptop for a test install of Debian I decided to install on my server. As with my laptop I decided to use an internet install but Debian refused to find my network card to do this despite trying 3 different PCI network cards! Any ideas?
17 REPLIES
Plusnet Alumni (retired) orbrey
Plusnet Alumni (retired)
Posts: 10,540
Registered: 18-07-2007

debian

Which version of the netinstall disk did you use, and did the install work on the laptop? Other than checking the md5 of the image and verifying the data after burning there's not really a lot you can do other than try a different version (ie testing or unstable as opposed to stable, in the hope that it has different drivers).

Do all of the network cards work with a different OS on the same box?
Community Veteran
Posts: 1,236
Registered: 02-08-2007

debian

I used the business card version of the latest stable release. All of the cards work perfectly with Fedora. I have since tried a net install of the testing version of Debian and it found the card but failed halfway through install. I think the motherboard I am using in buggered as I have had strange problems with ever since I got it of Ebay. It is an ECS d6vaa 1.1 with dual Pentium 3 at 1Ghz.
I fear I will have to replace it but I really like the older dual motherboards for my servers with the onboard RAID controllers. Getting difficult to find one that works perfectly now!
Plusnet Alumni (retired) orbrey
Plusnet Alumni (retired)
Posts: 10,540
Registered: 18-07-2007

debian

I must admit I had a similar problem recently with my own debian server (it's an old abit kg7-RAID so I know exactly what you mean about the older boards), though this turned out to be the PSU failing intermittently. If the install fails at the same point each time then it'll be easier to advise, but random failures speak of hardware issues to me. Just seems weird that Fedora works though.

I guess unfortunately I can't offer any more without any more info - does the fedora install also fail? does it fail at the same point each time? Sorry I can't offer any more advice.
Community Veteran
Posts: 1,236
Registered: 02-08-2007

debian

It fails at the same place near the end of instaling all the packages. This is really anoying cos it waits untill everything is downloaded before failing!
Community Veteran
Posts: 1,236
Registered: 02-08-2007

debian

Just came up with an idea. Maybe it is running out of disk space?
I have a 4.1Gb drive for the install and then 2 mirrored 2.1Gb for the web server folder. Maybe 4.1Gb not enough? It worked fine with Fedora core 4 though.
Community Veteran
Posts: 1,236
Registered: 02-08-2007

debian

I am going t try an 80Gb drive in it. I have one in a removeable caddy in one of my Windows machines. I just have to find space on the network to put everything that is on it. This is why I should invest in gigabit ethernet!
Community Veteran
Posts: 4,729
Registered: 04-04-2007

debian

Quote
This is why I should invest in gigabit ethernet!
But then you will be limited by the hard disk transfer speeds.

Chilly
N/A

Re: debian

Quote
I have decided to change from Fedora to Debian for my Linux server.
After using my laptop for a test install of Debian I decided to install on my server. As with my laptop I decided to use an internet install but Debian refused to find my network card to do this despite trying 3 different PCI network cards! Any ideas?


Not helpful, but just encouragement. I have debian etch on 2 desktops and one laptop. Very different ages and very different nics including wireless. Debian auto detected the lot, including on board devices, installed pci nic, and wireless dongles. Try a small live distro (puppy, dam small linux) and do lspci to test if the cards are detected.

I though Linux could be tricky to install, but that was before I tried installing windows, which I thought was bad until I met Vista installed on the laptop............but not for long :-)
N/A

debian

Might I suggest trying one of the Debian deriviative distros such as Mepis (my own preference) or Ubuntu/Kubuntu? Most of these distros are very good at recognising hardware and you still have access to all the repositories you would ever need using apt-get or similar commands.
Hope this helps - Chris
Community Veteran
Posts: 1,236
Registered: 02-08-2007

debian

Quote
Might I suggest trying one of the Debian deriviative distros such as Mepis (my own preference) or Ubuntu/Kubuntu? Most of these distros are very good at recognising hardware and you still have access to all the repositories you would ever need using apt-get or similar commands.
Hope this helps - Chris


Tried Kubuntu before and hated it. Had problems from the very start of install so I gave up very quick. I found Debian fantastic when tested on my laptop so want to try and stick to it. Have tried one of the testing versions and it found the card and installed but ran into lots of other problems after install. It wouldn't inatall Mysql among other problems but it is a testing version afterall. I WILL solve this problem but I only get time at the weekends to work on it.
Community Veteran
Posts: 1,236
Registered: 02-08-2007

Re: debian

Quote
Quote
I have decided to change from Fedora to Debian for my Linux server.
After using my laptop for a test install of Debian I decided to install on my server. As with my laptop I decided to use an internet install but Debian refused to find my network card to do this despite trying 3 different PCI network cards! Any ideas?


Not helpful, but just encouragement. I have debian etch on 2 desktops and one laptop. Very different ages and very different nics including wireless. Debian auto detected the lot, including on board devices, installed pci nic, and wireless dongles. Try a small live distro (puppy, dam small linux) and do lspci to test if the cards are detected.

I though Linux could be tricky to install, but that was before I tried installing windows, which I thought was bad until I met Vista installed on the laptop............but not for long :-)


I talked about Vista in a previous thread. Could not even find options during install to partition disks. I wouldn't use Vista if Bill Gates himself was paying me to! Even thinking of ditching my XP installations completely as I learn more about Linux which I am really getting into now.
N/A

debian

I am a fan of Linux so my comments are not neutral, but Vista seemed surprisingly bad. It was preinstalled on my new dual core, 1GB ram laptop and like wading through treacle. Obviously the hardware was inadequate .... LOL. It was also not clear who was in charge me or the OS. It kept phoning home before giving me permission to use the darn machine. I believe it was also regularly phoning home anyway.

The other shock the first time when it finally finished starting was there was basically just an OS. Where were the applications? It amazes me that people who do not play video games on their pc or need MS specific software put up with it - and in a serious vein give up there freedom and I suspect some privacy.
Community Veteran
Posts: 1,236
Registered: 02-08-2007

debian

I am not condemming Vista because I prefer Linux. I think Vista is rubbish compared with other Microsoft OS except possibly Windows Millenium which was maybe a bigger disaster. I think XP is the best Microsoft creation and has stood the test of time longer than any other version. Windows 2000 was good. XP was built on that and was similar but better so going by this pattern I personally had high hopes for Vista which were quickly dashed!
Community Veteran
Posts: 1,236
Registered: 02-08-2007

debian

As I gotten more and more into Linux I have a question about Windows?
Why do all computer companies preinstall Windows? How much do the pay Microsoft for each license or do Microsoft have a special deal with them to help maintain the monopoly?
I would like to see large manufacturers offering a Linux distribution at least as a free option for buyers. I think Lnux has got to the stage where it is a realistic desktop operating system for the average person on the street. This would be a great way to push the awareness and force other hardware and software companies to become more Linux compatible. I think the main problem for Linux is that most people think it is a complicated system for the hardened computer geek which of course it can be. However for doing the usual tasks that most people do on their Windows PC like web browsing, email and word processing Gnome or KDE are no different or any more cmplicated than any version of Windows.