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WARNING-Incoming dumb question

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WARNING-Incoming dumb question

I have a Solwise SAR130 router to which I have attached my Mac via the eternet socket,and it is working perfectly.I do however have to buy another router with multiple ethernet sockets to enable my wife and I to share the internet connection.But before I buy anything there is a puzzle that I need to solve and any help would be greatly appreciated.

If I connect the wifes laptop which is running Windows XP home edition to the router via the ethernet socket (after disconnecting the Mac as the router only has one ethernet socket),it apparently connects to the "Local area connection" ok,because it knows if the cable is not connected to the router,and once the "Local Area Connection" is activated the on line icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen is indicating "connected at 100kbps" so it is connected to something,but is it actually the router,and not just the inbuilt network card.

Assuming it is connecting to the router,and everything to connect to Plusnet is stored in the router itself,and I am basing that assumtion on the fact that the "Mac" connects to Plusnet with no problems at all.How do I go about telling the Laptop that when "Outlook Express" or "Internet Explorer" is opened input and output is to be via the ethernet and router,and not to try and use the dial-up.I have tried disabling the firewall on the XP laptop but am left with the feeling that the machine is doing something as the online timer that pops up when I double click on the "Local Area connection" icon increments upwards, but not indicating what,and apparently not connecting to Plusnet.

I am sure it is something very simple I am overlooking,as I would have thought that unplugging the Mac and connecting the laptop would not cause any problems for the router,and therefore it is something I have not ticked, dotted or selected in XP somewhere.I don't think I am trying to set up a network as we are only after internet connection and not file/printer sharing etc but then again perhaps I am;I don't know..... I am in unfamiliar territiory here and perhaps a "Local Area Connection" is not what I am after.

Sorry if this ia little vague,but have submitted all that I can think of that maybe useful.But not worth getting another router if I am going to have the same problem.Thanks in advance for any help,ideas suggestions.

Ian & Linda Jordan
14 REPLIES
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WARNING-Incoming dumb question

The good news is you won't need a new router at all, but I will get to that after.

When you connect the XP Laptop to the router, you are infact connecting it to a Local Area Network (LAN). The same applied with your Mac.

The online timer in XP only states how long the link has been established with the Lan and not how long your connected to the internet. The XP machine has to do no user/password authentication as this is the job of the router.

Depending on which ISP you have had the laptop connected to in the past, the Laptop should just be able to open IE and surf from the off with no problems.

If you have been connected on the laptop with a ISP like Freeserve (there are many others too), then you could have a proxy server setup in the IE settings, which can and will prevent you from browsing the internet correctly.

The first things to check are, in IE, open Tools -> Internet Options -> "Connections" tab

Make sure it is set to "Never dial a connection".

Click the "LAN settings" button and make sure all three check-boxes are cleared.

Ths should mean, provided that the Solwise router has the DHCP server enabled, that you can surf without problems.

As for using both the Laptop and the Mac at the same time, you need either a Switch or Hub. These allow more than two LAN devices to interconnect at any one time.

THe SAR130 is designed (as are most routers) such that you can share the single connection to many computers. SOme only come with a single port though (Like the 130).

Switch's are more expensive but cause less network performance related issues in the logn run (Switches have inteligent circuitry unlike hubs).

You can safly ignore the file or print sharing problems, as these more than anything are software related tasks and involve little more than changes to windows settings.
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WARNING-Incoming dumb question

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Ths should mean, provided that the Solwise router has the DHCP server enabled, that you can surf without problems.
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Thanks Acarr

But this is where I come to a grinding halt,I have no idea as to if the DHCP server is on or not,although I would suspect that the notice "No DCHP server pool" would suggest that it may not be,and at the moment my expertise does not seem to be up to sorting out start and end IP/DNS (can't quite remember excactly what it said.Just that when I saw that I said "time to get someone in to sort it out".

Although I have made some progress,using your suggestions regarding IE options the proper lights now come light up on the router,but cannot open webpages or send recieve e-mails.

The world of routers sure is an interesting place :-) and capable of providing challenges for a long time to come .

Once again thanks

Ian & Linda Jordan
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WARNING-Incoming dumb question

The quickest thing I can think of is to plug the XP box in to the router, double click the Network icon in the taskbar and goto the Support tab.

What does it say for "Address type"?
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WARNING-Incoming dumb question

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What does it say for "Address type"?
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WARNING-Incoming dumb question

sorry about that pressed wrong button
But in answer to your question,and I suspect here lurks the problem.

Address type=invalid IP address
IP adress = 0.0.0.0
subnet mask = 0.0.0.0
default gateway= blank

We thank you for your patience on this one

Ian & Linda
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WARNING-Incoming dumb question

It sounds as if the DHCP server needs setting up on the router.

As I don't have that router and it is bed time, i can't help too much. I will attempt look at the manual tomorrow.
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WARNING-Incoming dumb question

look at the ip of the Mac when thats connected( I dont macs so cant tell you how to see that). Then set the Xp up with the next one. so if the mac is 10.0.0.3 with a subnet of 255.255.255.0 the set xp up as 10.0.0.4 subnet 255.255.255.0 set the dns and most important the default gateway which is the routers address and away you go.
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WARNING-Incoming dumb question

Thanks for the reply.I am going shopping tomorrow for something with a few more ethernet ports,But am beginning to wonder if a router is really what I need when all I really want to do is connect a Mac and a Windows XP laptop to the ADSL line and be able to share the account at the same time.We have no need of file sharing or printer sharing etc.So is a router the way for me to go,or (and pardon my ignorance here) would a switch/hub plus ADSL modem do the job with less complications,or would that cause more problems with regards to setting up the connections in each machine as regards using the ethernet ports.if a router is the best way I have been looking long and hard at the latest "Netgear" offering,and reviews would seem to indicate that it almost does everthing for your,virtually plug everything in and make connection to ISP and it works most thing out,can anyone comment on this.

Because I think one of the reasons for my problems are that there are to many variables involved at the moment Mac OS X,Windows XP,an ISDN router/Switch that I am attempting to use as a switch plus the Solwise SAR130 so I figure that if I just go out and buy something that does everything,and the computers can be connected direct then my problems may be
reduced somewhat.

But I thank you both for the advice and feedback,but I am rapidly getting way out of my depth at the moment :-)

Ian & Linda
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WARNING-Incoming dumb question

I would try and get your laptop to work first otherwise
you'll have similar problems with the Netgear.
A router is the best solution for you, otherwise you'll
have to use internet connection sharing and connect
one pc via another and as one is a mac ..... more complications
and a less than ideal way of sharing a connection.
The Netgear router is a good idea if your planning to
go wireless, as you previously indicated alternatively
you could get a wireless access point to use with the Solwise.
In control panel/network connections find the icon
for the laptops network card usually under LAN/high speed
internet and double click.
Make sure Internet protocal tcp/ip is ticked in the dialog
box select properties and select use the following IP address.
Enter the address 192.168.7.3 ( this is assuming that the mac
is 192.168.7.2) as long as there not the same .
enter the subnet mask as 255.255.255.0
enter the default gateway as 192.168.7.1
enter plusnets two DNS servers.
For adsl 212.159.13.49 &212.159.13.50.
Click ok and re-boot.Hopefully you should now see
the Solwise and Net , then you could try adding the
Mac to your switch. If it doesn't work you'll need
a dedicated hub/switch for the Solwise.
DHCP is disabled by default on the Solwise
to enable it you have to bring up its web configurator in
your browser by typing 192.168.7.1.
If you enble DHCP then this will automatically configure
everything for your PC's but in your LAN settings
you still have to tick the box ' obtain an IP address automatically'
on your PC's otherwise you'll get no results.

edit : forgot DNS servers.
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WARNING-Incoming dumb question

YIPEEEEE!!!!!! thanks to all you people I have got the laptop connected to broadband,now if it will just hold together when I plug it into the multi port router tomorrow I shall be extremly happy :-)

Once again thanks for your help.

Ian & Linda
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WARNING-Incoming dumb question

If you have followed the above stuff to get it working, then the final step of making sure you get the right equipment is needed.

The SAR130 is the router, which you already have.

What you need now is a Hub, Switch or Switching Hub, and not another router.

If you where to purchase another router, you would only be adding to the confusion.

As I noted previously, hubs/switches provide a method of conecting more than two devices via ethernet at any one time (your system to the router is the current two).

As you have a basic setup, either will do, though switches are more expensive. This is due to the inteligent cirtuitry which is designed to provide a much more issue free network.

These benefits only apply to larger networks though, so a hub would do you fine.
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WARNING-Incoming dumb question

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What you need now is a Hub, Switch or Switching Hub, and not another router.
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Actually it's even better than that,after much swearing cursing and experimentation,I just need to stroll down the local electronics shop and get a cable made up; the Draytek 2200x works perfectly as a switch as this is the set up I am working on at the moment,just need a cable to connect the laptop and everyone,including I hope "She who must be obeyed" should be happy.I demonstrated the ADSL connection to her........ her response "won't have time to make coffee while my newsgroups download anymore" which I take to be a seal of approval :-)

Ian & Linda
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WARNING-Incoming dumb question

Thanks Guys

Cable made up and installed=2 computers connected: with the result I am a happy bunny and more important so is the wife :-) who wants to know if that is a fish tank next to the Christmas Tree on the webcams :-)

Ian & Linda Jordan

PS Seasons Greeting to one and all
csogilvie
Grafter
Posts: 5,852
Registered: 04-04-2007

WARNING-Incoming dumb question

Certainly looks like one from here Smiley