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Routers which one

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Routers which one

It has come round for me buying a router. I want it for connected my 2nd pc to my laptop my bros pc and my xbox. Which ones are good. I am thinking wireless ones seem more of a better choice purley cause of no wires.

Links please

Thanks all
19 REPLIES
TOTKO
Grafter
Posts: 62
Registered: 06-08-2007

Routers which one

After seeing a number of reviews, I went for the Netgear DG834G.

I've been more than happy with it and would recommend it based on my experience.
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Routers which one

first off make sure you get an ADSL router not a DSL one (as these are for cable)
I would recomend anything by linksys or Zyxel if you can find a UK retailer for them. Dlink are awful so stay away from them.

Wireless is ok, if a bit slow, insecure and prone to breaking but I'm sure you wont mind fixing it every so often.

Wires give the stability and the reasurance that if one thing breaks at leatst you can usualy see the fault :p

Buz
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Routers which one

Right wires it is then thanks for the tips guys
lowry
Grafter
Posts: 478
Registered: 08-04-2007

Routers which one

I am thinking about getting the Netgear DG834G in the next couple of weeks as from reviews and user experiences I have read on various places on the net it looks good. Make sure you get an ADSL router and not a Broadband Router, as most products with Broadband Router on them have no built-in ADSL modem.

matt Wink
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Routers which one

good choice on wires, now just remeber you need "stright through cat5e cable" not cross over cable if you want to use a router with a built in switch. If you share the connection via a PC then you will need a cross over cable

buz
Community Veteran
Posts: 14,469
Registered: 30-07-2007

Routers which one

Many routers are auto-sensing now so you can use either type of cat5 cable. You do need to check the router beforehand though.
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Routers which one

Quote
Dlink are awful so stay away from them.


I don'nt know if D-Link have had a problem with their combined router and modem but I have been using a D-Link seperate modem and wireless router for 12 months and it has been rock steady and was very easy to set up.

Just curious as was considering getting a combined unit should either my modem of router fail, and concerned that there maybe a problem with D-link all in one units.

Did an experiment out of interest when I read your comments regarding wireless being slow because I also thought that wireless would be slower. So tried the "Plusnet" speed test with the main machine which is wired to the router via ethernet cable and got a reading of 927.80 on a 1 meg connection, then tried the wifes laptop which is connected by wireless in the next room and got a figure that suprised me given the distance from the router of 925.30.Not a scientific test I know but I would have thought a brick wall would have slowed things down more.So for me at least I would not say that wireless is particularly slower than a wired connection.

Interesting how a simple comment by "buzzons" has started me thinking about my router, as I have'nt done before I bought it and the modem plugged everything in it practically set itself up and it's worked ever since.Never even considered the speed of the wireless aspect before but have learned something today.

What does interest me though is why combined modem/routers are so relatively inexpensive for general use, and it maybe a marketing thing ie not many people buy adsl modems and routers as seperate items therefore thay are more expensive, or are there corners cut in combined units to keep prices down which may be why someones product is better or worse than someone elses.For example I had a look on Amazon at the price of the mentioned "Netgear DG834G" which was £79.99 (perhaps not so inexpensive) which would have given me a bit of change,although not much from buying the modem, would'nt be enough to have paid for the router.Hence my thoughts regarding marketing or corner cutting.

Why did I choose D-Link......... not for the technical specifications they may as well be written in ancient Sanskrit for all the sense they made to me, not for the price there were far cheaper ones around.in fact I had the Plusnet supplied one which combined with a switch allowed me to connect 2 computers.It was simply to get a piece of software working, and out of about half a dozen routers that would allow the software to work straight from the box listed on the software support pages, the D-Link router was the only one that "Amazon" had in stock, and then I found it did not include a modem so one of those went on the same order :-(

Everyone has their favorites the D-Link is mine, not because it is better than others (I am sure it may not be) but for a year it has done what I want; has'nt failed once, and that is all I worry about: download speeds do not interest me( all I know is it is miles faster then my previous ISDN connection, and cheaper overall) in fact today is the first time in a long while I have been near the speed test.

Just a few thoughts but I think in the long run given manufacturing techniques,and that unless one is a wizz on understanding specifications unlike myself if you get the best you can afford I think that most routers/modems on the market these days probably do not have a lot to choose between them.

Ian & Linda Jordan
Community Veteran
Posts: 6,983
Thanks: 8
Registered: 10-04-2007

Routers which one

Quote


Everyone has their favorites the D-Link is mine, not because it is better than others (I am sure it may not be) but for a year it has done what I want; has'nt failed once, and that is all I worry about: download speeds do not interest me( all I know is it is miles faster then my previous ISDN connection, and cheaper overall) in fact today is the first time in a long while I have been near the speed test.



Yes I have used a D-Link for a couple of years now and its been fine so have several others that friends of mine have.
However they were the DSL-504 version which I think is now unavailable.
I recently purchased and set up the 504T version for another client and I was a bit dissapointed with it as it didn't seem to have as good facilities as the original 504.
Yes it worked fine but was a bit fiddly to set up and it would not be the one I would go for again.
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Routers which one

Seeing as the fastest wireless is 54mb/s and the fastest cable (home) is 1gigabit/s, the slowest wireless 10mbi/s(.a?) and the slowest cable 10mb/s (10baseT) it would show that on a 1mbit connection neither would have a problem. Its more for the internal traffic that it matters from PC to PC not from PC to interwub.

You may like D-Link, I dont *shrug* fair is fair. I also hate wireless with a passion so heh.

Buz
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Buz, why do you hate wireless? (sorry for the off topic post)
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slower than wires, insecure, easily breaks, wires are fun ^_^
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Wireless is very fun too.

Linking two sites roughly 1 mile apart, accross a valley was very fun indeed.

Wireless is only as insecure as you configure it.
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acarr for that i would have used fiber, it will work what ever :p

and no, wireless in inherantly insecure as you cant say who has axx to teh packets, at least wtih wires they have to plug into your lan
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Routers which one

Fibre would be an interesting one to say the least. Aside from the fact you would need either a telecomunications licence in the first place, for laying lines within the public highway, it's also expensive to get the likes of BT involved.

The link also crossed a river, so would subject to longer lengths of cable runs.

All in all, it's either the safe and fast wired method, running into the tens of thousands of pounds. Or the slower wireless link, with beefed up security measures.

The wireless link is formed of two bog standard WAP's you can buy from most onlien retailers, geared at the residential market (let alone business). Link setup in bridge mode, including a basic WEP security measure.

This is rubish security I know, but coupled with MAC filtering, nothing has direct access other than 4 MAC's (1 WAP & 1 router on each side of the link).

The primary security is actualy formed using site-to-site VPN. So security was never at risk from the wireless compoent.

The network gets between 21Mb on a good day, and 13Mb during severe weather conditions. We are not sure what link level speeds are obtained, but those speeds are after both the wireless encryption and the VPN.

The site only needs roughly a 712Kb connection anyhow, so there is tons of spare capacity and future expansion.

The cost of the setup before labour was only £310 per site, with the WAPs supporting MESH too, it should be easy to add other sites (super unlikely).

Comparing that to fibre, or even ADSL at the two sites, it is very low. As 712Kb is needed, your talking a bonded service, which aint cheap.

OK, maybe not your typical setup, I might add, but very cost effective and great laugh to install.