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Overheating CPU

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Overheating CPU

I have had this PC since March and the CPU temperature is never below 55°C even with two CPU fans. It's an AMD Athlon XP 2000+ (1667Mhz) on a Soltek SLKT400-A4C. I havn't overclocked it or anything. The motherboard mentioned earlier has a safety feature that turns the PC off if the temperature gets too high. It was set at a default of turn off above 60°C but the temperature fluctuations meant that I couldn't keep the computer on for more than a few minutes so I set it to 80. It still managed to turn off when I was playing certain games (Unreal Tournament and Age of Empires II) so I have now set it to 100°C. I dont want it to be this high because AMD say that their processors can withstand up to 80°C. Does anyone have any suggestions as to how to keep the temperature down (preferably to less than 40°C if possible)?

Oh, I should probably mention that the CPU fan that's in it is the one that CCL gave me with the processor which suggests that it should be enough to keep the temp down. (I used the custom configuration service and built it myself with the components they sent)
The motherboard gets the temperature reading from a thermal diode in the CPU by the way, the sensor outside of the CPU reads at a pretty constant 47°C.
15 REPLIES
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Overheating CPU

You will likely strike out at about 50, when playing games, but otherwise, a natural temperature would be between 37 and 44C

I would strongly sugest you look at the CPU fans you have, and look into investing in a extractor fan for the chasis
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Overheating CPU

Yes, I read somewhere else that idle temp should be about 40. my motherboard has a utility with it to display the temperature and speed of up to two cpu fans. the 2nd fan, i have to admit, is very old (5 years) and doesn't have much throughput but it should help a bit. I'll definatly look into those fans though Smiley
Screenshot of temperature reading
LastRoMan
Grafter
Posts: 125
Registered: 15-09-2007

Overheating CPU

I had the same problem last year and even paid for the CPU fan to be replaced - only to find later that it was the PSU fan that was causing the problem - it was worth paying £25 for a new PSU and fan.

I must say I like your graphic readout. Cool
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Overheating CPU

I've just checked my PSU fan and the air coming out of it is minimal.. I'll have to think about replacing that too :? I was talking to one of my friends and he said that I should have two fans, one blowing air in and the other blowing it out but I can only see one fan...
And I like that utility too, i can also minimise it into the system tray where it gives a constant readout of the CPU temp (thermal diode one) Smiley
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Overheating CPU

First off, those graphic readouts, and the system sensors are never accurate.

They are not calibrated, and with the constant thoerma change in a PC, they become less accurate with age.

This is no reason to ignore it though, as there is a lot to be seen from it (IE, huge thermal shifts).

The fan speeds are simalar, but more acurate.

I would say both your fans are running under optimal. It would be worth swapping the slower one.

As for the two fans thing. If you are on about PSU, this is not true. A PSU only need one fan at the rear. However, some models do have two. They are unneeded, as the one does the job needed.

A fast fan to cool the CPU and a second one to keep an airflow in the case is what I reomend. Be this to drag air in, or take air out, it is up to you.
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Overheating CPU

as i said the second, slower, fan is 5 years old and i got it from an old comp with a 266 AMD K6-2. i've pretty much bodged it into the case at the front because I couldn't find a proper was of attaching it.. Shockedops:
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Overheating CPU

fan and heatsink will not be doing the job if the thermal connection between the CPU and the heatsink is poor. One fast CPU fan is always better than two unless the airflow for both fans is regulated, otherwise back pressure could lead to no air circulation despite two fans.
The sensors tend to be below the CPU.
One extra fan in the case is also a good idea but if used as an extractor fan, make sure it does not have a higher capacity than the PSU fan, otherwise the PSU may be starved of airflow.
chino
Grafter
Posts: 446
Registered: 27-06-2007

Overheating CPU

Only my thoughs, but one thing i would do first is buy a new heat sink & fan combo usally around £10, though the prices can go either way + you can choose a silent fan if you so wish. I would go for the biggest heat sink and fan you can fit in for your problem. My current cpu is only 1.7amd but it had a 2.6 heat sink and cool master fan.

cUnDaLl
bluewhale
Rising Star
Posts: 883
Thanks: 15
Registered: 30-07-2007

Overheating CPU

Athlons are rated to go upto over 70C, so you may not have a problem.

Some motherboards temp sensors actually touch the cpu and therefore give a more accurate but higher reading.

Is the heatsink seated correctly? You might want to get some arctic silver and try reseating it. Note if you take the heatsink off, you must get some new compound.

Is your system stable? If it is you may not need to worry. My system runs at ~60C ( 2400+) on a hot day.
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Overheating CPU

my system is pretty stable. i've noticed that after about 24 hours of leaving it on continuously without a reboot the page file usage goes through the roof but i'm assuming that's unrelated.
Athlons have thermal diodes in them to read the temperature more accuratly than the motherboard supposedly. My motherboard detects the temp as being about 46-50 when the thermal diode is 55-60 (that's now and it's currently not very warm).
bluewhale
Rising Star
Posts: 883
Thanks: 15
Registered: 30-07-2007

Overheating CPU

doesn't sound like you've a problem to me, but i'm not an expert.

although i would be worried about your swap file being used up, sounds like you've got a background process eating up memory.

if you sort by mem in the task manager you'll be able to find out what it is..
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Overheating CPU

Windows will eat swap space regardless of what you wish it to do.

Swap space, is never cleared until the space is needed agin. This means a overall performance boost, but crap performance when swap is needed quickly.

The exception to this, is just after a reboot, hence the reasons most people recomend a reboot to fix most performance related issues.
bluewhale
Rising Star
Posts: 883
Thanks: 15
Registered: 30-07-2007

Overheating CPU

i'm afraid this just isn't true.

windows is only using up the space as your apps need it. so if you have an app/process that's gradually requiring more memory then the swap space will increase to accomodate it. if you stop that process then the swap usage will drop.

you should definitely look at whats using the most mem up and that'll be your problem.
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Overheating CPU

There are 3 sets of figures with swap space, active (that currently in use by applications), available (the overall swap file space) and consumed.

Any windows application that uses memory, can and will free it, however, windows does not allways return it back for active use right away. However, should a application need it, it is there.

The same applies to swap space. Because it is a file, it is treated like fragmentation of a disk.

1: Windows dumps memory to swap.

2: This swap is freed later on

At this point, windows does not make any physical changes to the file. The data remains, however, is is tagged as free in the memory. This means there is less read/writes to disk.

You are correct, it is only used as needed, but this file becomes very very fragmented, when the uptime becomes greater.

When your HD becomes fragmented, this is because files are split accross sectors. The swap file is the same, after time, memory dumps to this file, become scattered at various location throughout it.

The multiple HD seek atteributes to thsi performance hit.