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Linspire aka Lindows

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Linspire aka Lindows

Has anyone tried Linspire?

I want my microsoft stuff to work like outlook etc. and hate having to pay their prices each time a new operating system comes out.

Is it completely compatible?
21 REPLIES
Denzil
Grafter
Posts: 1,733
Registered: 31-07-2007

Linspire aka Lindows

Haven't tried it myself ( I use Suse), but as I understand it Linspire is designed to be very easy to use, but might be a bit restricting. You can only install new software buying paying for the proprietory installation service for each piece of software, for example. The 'mainstream' distributions like Suse, Mandriva and Fedora are much more flexible, but are still easy to use.

They are all cheap to install, anyway, so you can try one and if you don't like it just try a different one. Any up to date Linux will be able to read Windows files, though Windows cannot read the Linux filesystem. You can use Openoffice to open most Microsoft Office files, and things like graphics (e.g. JPEG) and audio files should be no problem either. There is good free software that will do all the common tasks, so go ahead and try it.

Denzil
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Linspire aka Lindows

Thanks Denzil, I'll bite the bullet and give it a go! (On a different Hard disk though Cheesy )
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Linspire aka Lindows

I've just moved from Redhat base distribution to Ubuntu 5.04 and this distribution is spoton for home user. It has everything for home user and much nicer than any other distributions that I've had my hands on.
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Linspire aka Lindows

Can you tell me why you think it better than windows?
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Linspire aka Lindows

Quote
Can you tell me why you think it better than windows?


I wouldn't say that Ubuntu or Linux is better than Windows in any way since some of the things you couldn't do without Windows especially games. Linux is just an alternative if you're getting bored with Windows or if you just couldn't stand the money you need to pay for certain software upgrades.

Anyway, take a look at how good my Ubuntu looks from this snapshot that I did last week:

http://cgi.melayu.plus.com/wordpress/images/x/Screenshot.jpg
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Linspire aka Lindows

Tongue wow.
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Linspire aka Lindows

I have tried an old version of Lindows.

Seriously, they are trying to copy Windows. They have reworked and renamed a lot of the KDE open source software so that they all have the feeling that they were made by the same company, like you'd get with Windows or Mac. They've even gone as far as charging money for it! The so-called Click-N-Run warehouse provides one-click installation of software, but it's not free. There's something you can change to make it use the standard Debian software repository (Linspire is Debian-based), hence getting it all for free (except the commercial software and anything Lindows may have changed in the non-commercial software).

They provide a Windows-esque KDE desktop (which means shielding people from some of KDE's features, like multiple desktops, by default), and to be honest, it's not worth it.

If you want to get away from Windows go for something free like Mandriva, MEPIS, Debian, Slackware, Ubuntu etc. I use Gentoo but I don't recommend it for beginners. I usually recommend MEPIS, but that's only on theory; I've barely used it.
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Linspire aka Lindows

Thanks for your time. From the lacklustre replies I have decided to try Suse 9.3, I am just about ready to get it loaded, so fingers crossed.
Denzil
Grafter
Posts: 1,733
Registered: 31-07-2007

Linspire aka Lindows

Suse 9.3 has got some very good reviews. Be interested to hear what you think (I am on 9.1). Installation should be straightforward, it will detect a copy of Windows and give you the choice to dual boot. Once installed I found most things are fairly intuitive for an ex Windows user. Some things can be tricky at first, like working out why the media player doesn't work very well, but there is lots of information out there to help sort them out.
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Dual boot

Hi,
I would like to dual boot, but I have NTFS so I thought that I'd use partition magic to turn windows back to FAT32 and then install SUSE. That is why I have taken so long, I have read up and am now am waiting for partition magic to get delivered.
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Linspire aka Lindows

I'm pretty sure some installations/programs offer NTFS partition resizing. Can't remember the details.
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Linspire aka Lindows

To have full access to windows files the partition must be FAT32, the documentation simply says to re-install windows on a FAT 32 file system, I'd rather use partition magic.
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Linspire aka Lindows

Although I haven't been able to test it myself, I'm sure Linux can access files on NTFS filesystems fine.
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Linspire aka Lindows

No idea about Suse 9.3 (tried it, but I don't like the KDE look on my GNOME desktop.. stayed in my HD for 2 days) .. but I'm 100% sure that any RedHat/Fedora distribution doesn't come with NTFS support out of box. Ubuntu however, has NTFS out of the box .. Sorry, I've just made a switch to Ubuntu from Fedora and Suse and I'm really happy with what I have right now .. and that why you'll see me praising Ubuntu from time to time Smiley