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Yum tingle tongue

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Yum tingle tongue

Ermm..

In a attempt to bump up my SNR a little I just reterminated all my phone connections.

Being the lasy get i am i decidedto use my teeth to strip the insulation on the main incoming BT wire with me teeth, just as a phone call came in...

ring ring tingle tongue..


always use the proper tools Cheesy

Moderators note by chris (fa55dsl): All caps title removed, this is considered rude and shouting.
16 REPLIES
passer
Grafter
Posts: 381
Registered: 06-04-2007

Yum tingle tongue

lmao! :lol:

Have you re-tasted - sorry, re-tested the SNR? Smiley
jagger
Grafter
Posts: 411
Registered: 25-06-2007

Yum tingle tongue

and more to the point, did it taste any good? :idea:
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Yum tingle tongue

LOL. I did that once with the output lead from a 150w guitar amp just as my mate struck a power chord :shock: brrrr!
pacem
Grafter
Posts: 175
Registered: 07-09-2007

Yum tingle tongue

Owch!
Doesn't a standard BT line have a line voltage of 50V which drops to 12V when ringing is sounding? I hope you didn't have hold of both wires. :-)

Paul.<><
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Yum tingle tongue

couldve been worse. You could have been wearing Braces :shock:
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50V

http://www.cycom.co.uk/howto/bttelephone40macurrentsource.html

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A real BT line has 2 wires with a DC voltage of 50V when the phone is on-hook. When the phone goes off-hook, it draws current such that the BT line supplies 40mA and the voltage on the 2 wires will drop to maybe 9V


ahh so its the leading edge of the 50v coming back after first rin you can feel.

ringy ringy...tingly thingy,,
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Yum tingle tongue

Ringing voltage is ac not dc and is typically 70 to 90Vrms. In the old days BT could send down a metering pulse to telephone loggers and this was 110V ac.
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Re: 50V

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A real BT line has 2 wires with a DC voltage of 50V when the phone is on-hook.

So much for the real BT lines, what about the pretend ones ?
Highlighted
shellsong
Grafter
Posts: 2,191
Registered: 03-08-2007

Yum tingle tongue

I thought telephone exchanges used to be run off an array of massive rechargeable cells on trickle charge to ensure that power was always available in emergencies-- in fact I know that twenty years ago a work mate of mine managed to obtain some that were being replaced and they were really huge lead/acid accumulators!

Does anyone know what sort of voltage they were connected up for? I can't remember if they were 6 volt or 12 volt units.

(Btw my son and I assembled a "pretend" one for an attempted Skype phone and we used a 9 volt battery!)
avalon
Grafter
Posts: 361
Registered: 05-04-2007

Yum tingle tongue

The exchanges were mains powered with an array of lead acid batteries as backup power, not just for the lines but to power the whole exchange as well.

The exchanges also had a backup diesel generator which would autostart if the power hadn't come on before the batteries started to run down to recharge them. The genny would have at least a weeks supply of diesel in a buried tank.
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Yum tingle tongue

I know where im going to be parking my caravan next time we have a power outage then Smiley
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Yum tingle tongue

Thats clearly back in the day when BT did things properly.
These days the genny's have probably been pinched!
We had a long power (and comms) outage at work a short while ago - some enterprising gypsies had set their sights on the copper conductors inside our local substation - (seems it didn't work entirely well)
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Yum tingle tongue

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The genny would have at least a weeks supply of diesel in a buried tank.

That's interesting! But isn't diesel supposed to go all waxy or something if it's left unused for too long? Wonder how they got round that one..
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ermm

i think diesel can go waxy when cold as its a higher fraction than petrol.