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Usage allowance - another 7% less

wjharing
Grafter
Posts: 27
Registered: 22-08-2007

Usage allowance - another 7% less

Hi there.

Although the allowance for Broadband Option 1 is 15Gb, it is effective 10Gb (due to throttled speed). I don't think is fair, but believe many have already discussed about this.

However, reading the small prints, it seems Plus.net is not even using the 1024 bytes in a Kilobyte, but a mere 1000 bytes only. This means that we are robbed from another 7% of our monthly usage. With VOD and BT/ITV trials, usage at those peak hours become very important.

Quote

How we measure data:
1000 Kilobytes = 1MB (Megabyte), 1000 MB = 1 GB (Gigabyte)


I believe there was/is a lawsuit against Seagate/WD or another hard drive manufactory because of 'overselling' capacity, even when small prints state how they come to their figures.

Wouter.
12 REPLIES
N/A

Usage allowance - another 7% less

Sorry but thats incorrect, the Si industry standard for 1GB is 1000mb

1024mb is 1GiB

On www.apple.com with regards to their ipod apple have this to say:

"1GB = 1 billion bytes; actual formatted capacity less."

It's the industry standard and has been done ot death on these boards. Most/all ISPs use it.
wjharing
Grafter
Posts: 27
Registered: 22-08-2007

Usage allowance - another 7% less

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gigabyte

in some sectors they use 1000=k, in others 1024=k.

but my point is, every byte is one more, so 7% less based on a definition...
N/A

Usage allowance - another 7% less

Based on a definition not used in this industryor/sect!

Also the link you posted simply backs up what I said!!

"1,073,741,824 bytes, equal to 10243, or 230 bytes. This is the definition used for computer memory sizes, and most often used in computer engineering, computer science, and most aspects of computer operating systems. The IEC recommends that this unit should instead be called a gibibyte (abbreviated GiB), as it conflicts with SI units"

Which is what I said and:

"1,000,000,000 bytes or 109 bytes is the decimal definition used in telecommunications (such as network speeds) and most computer storage manufacturers (such as hard disks and flash drives). This usage is compatible with SI."


Which is what I said.
wjharing
Grafter
Posts: 27
Registered: 22-08-2007

Usage allowance - another 7% less

I think you're missing my point.

Sure, various groups and organisations are using the simple notation of bytes by using the 10^x formula, but this is partly introduced for simplicity. If you talk about correctness, we should all use the 2^x formula. The fact that computer memory (RAM) is sold by using one formula, while computer memory (hard-drives) using another, is not right.
N/A

Usage allowance - another 7% less

I'm not missing your point at all, THIS industry does not use that definition of a GB (which is more correctly said as GiB) so it's irrelevant.

One GB = 1000MB if you're an ISP or the customer of an ISP, if you're buying RAM then 1GiB = 1024MB.

The two are seperate, distinct entities used for two seperate distinct purposes.

You're not loosing 7% because plusnet are working to the correct unit, if you were sold RAM using GB rather than GiB then the memory manufacturer is in the wrong. PlusNet however are perfectly correct.
wjharing
Grafter
Posts: 27
Registered: 22-08-2007

Usage allowance - another 7% less

so when I'm downloading 1 megabyte of data into my 1 megabyte computer memory, I still have 7 kilobytes of memory left.

I feel cheated...
N/A

Usage allowance - another 7% less

oh well, time to start gettiing over it I suppose.

The alternative it to begin a weird campaign and lobby the whole industry about an issue which not really many people care about.
N/A

Usage allowance - another 7% less

Perhaps if PN user a lower case K then everything will be correct :lol:

k=1000
K=1024

Therefore when they specify 1000KB=1M which imply that 1MB=1024.

If they had specified 1000kB=1MB then 1M=1000

Don't take this message to seriously
shellsong
Grafter
Posts: 2,191
Registered: 03-08-2007

Usage allowance - another 7% less

Quote
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, abbreviated KiB (never "kiB").

1 kibibyte = 2^10 bytes = 1,024 bytes

The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to 10^3 bytes = 1,000 bytes (see binary prefix).

Usage of these terms is intended to help prevent the confusion common among storage media, due to the ambiguous meaning of "kilobyte".

Popular use and
(SI standard meaning)
Name Symbol Quantity
kilobyte kB 2^10 (10^3)
megabyte MB 2^20 (10^6)
gigabyte GB 2^30 (10^9)
terabyte TB 2^40 (10^12)
petabyte PB 2^50 (10^15)
exabyte EB 2^60 (10^1Cool
zettabyte ZB 2^70 (10^21)
yottabyte YB 2^80 (10^24)

Binary prefix standards
from IEC 60027-2
Name Symbol Quantity
kibibyte KiB 2^10
mebibyte MiB 2^20
gibibyte GiB 2^30
tebibyte TiB 2^40
pebibyte PiB 2^50
exbibyte EiB 2^60
zebibyte ZiB 2^70
yobibyte YiB 2^80


As can be seen from this kilobyte is the only one with a shortening that can take a lower case leading letter (kB rather than KB) although it can be used with the upper case form

It is clearly advisable where ambiguity needs to be avoided that the standardised decimal or binary notations are used where relevant rather than the sloppier "popular" version!

In this instance I'm sorry to inform you that PlusNet are right! Tongue
N/A

Usage allowance - another 7% less

Regardless of how many megabytes there are ina gigabyte, how the heck did you calculate 7%??

1% of 1024 is 10.24, making 24 (if that is how many less megabytes you get per gigabyte) 2.34%. Or is my maths horribly wrong?
N/A

Usage allowance - another 7% less

If you calculate the difference of G=10^9 and G=2^30 it's just over 7% I believe.
shellsong
Grafter
Posts: 2,191
Registered: 03-08-2007

Usage allowance - another 7% less

A gibibyte is 1 073 741 824 bytes or 7.3 741 824% more than a gigabyte-- you forgot it's 1KiB cubed! Wink

You beat me to it pchambers! Tongue