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The future of P2P

Community Veteran
Posts: 38,216
Thanks: 913
Fixes: 54
Registered: 15-06-2007

The future of P2P

Just seen this on Sunbelt Blog
Quote
There’s been news out that Time Warner will be making its back catalog of old TV shows for a new Internet service.

Digital analyst Phil Leigh is actually a bit impressed, and has this to say about it:

Congratulations to Time Warner ...for taking the biggest step yet to launch an "Internet of Video". The plans by Warner Brothers to make their back catalog of old TV shows available for a new Internet service, termed In2TV, early next year is to be vigorously applauded by those of us who want to see Digital Media come-of-age. They have 4,800 episodes from more than 100 old television series that they'll be distributing at the AOL portal.

There are five reasons why we think this is significant.

First, the content has genuine value to consumers. Some of the programs include such formerly popular ones as Maverick, Welcome Back Kotter, Eight is Enough, and The Fugitive. It is not oddball programming from the lunatic fringe.

Second, they're free. Programs on In2TV will be advertising supported, but will have only one or two minutes per half-hour episode as compared to today's standard of eight minutes on regular network shows.

Third, more than any initiative since satellite television, this one promotes the benefits of competition into the video-to-the-home market where the Cable TV companies have been exercising the power of a gatekeeper for too long. Cable companies have abused their near monopoly power in two ways. First, they sometimes require program originators to pay them money for the privilege of being "carried" on the system. In such instances they "double dip" by charging the viewers a monthly fee to see the programs. Second, they often structure subscriptions in such a way that the consumer has to pay for things that she doesn't necessarily want in order to gain access to the services she does want. For example, you often cannot get video-on-demand without first becoming a digital cable subscriber. That means you pay an incremental monthly fee, merely to have the "right" to pay a "pay-per-view" fee as well.

Fourth, AOL will be using Peer-To-Peer technology in order to economically distribute the video. This is significant because it underscores the point that the first uses of a technology are not always good predictors of the ultimate uses. As anyone not living in a cave for the past five years will recognize, the P2P concept was first popularized by Shawn Fanning's Napster and was universally condemned by the media companies owing to the initial use characterized by the unauthorized sharing of copyrighted music files. Time Warner's intent to employ legitimate P2P distribution via Kontiki's network illustrates how important it is that courts avoid outlawing an entire technology merely because its first user engage in illegal activity.

Fifth, it seems almost certain that the initiative will evolve into the first major application of video podcasting. People who want to watch the programs are very likely going to want to subscribe to them. For example, if you are a big fan of James Garner's Maverick, you'd rather have each episode automatically delivered to your computer than to be required to visit the AOL portal to see if additional episodes have been posted. If In2TV does become the first important instance of video podcasting, it is likely to be good for Microsoft and, not-so-good for Apple. That's because it will promote the awareness that RSS delivery of Digital Media is not exclusive to the iPod. Most subscribers will be viewing these programs on their computers. It is not yet even known if they will play on the iPod.
32 REPLIES
N/A

The future of P2P

Heh! Well we shall not be able to get these tv programs then as p2p is buggered on this network.
Alecto
Grafter
Posts: 2,886
Registered: 30-07-2007

The future of P2P

Very interesting.
It does show what many of us suspect, that Plusnet is not quite on the right track in discouraging P2P in the hope that it will go away.
Ben_Brown
Grafter
Posts: 2,839
Registered: 13-06-2007

The future of P2P

We aren't discouraging P2P, we are managing our network. In fact one of the reasons that we are managing our network now is so when products such as these are rolled out we will be able to deliver them to our customers.
Alecto
Grafter
Posts: 2,886
Registered: 30-07-2007

The future of P2P

I see. So throttling a particular type of traffic isn't discouraging it. It's just managing it then. So we're actually being encouraged to use P2P by the effort you guys are putting into managing it? Sounds good. I'll get Azureus going straight away.
Ben_Brown
Grafter
Posts: 2,839
Registered: 13-06-2007

The future of P2P

We don't want to stop people using p2p, we do however want people to use it with other users in mind. For most of our customers they can use p2p as much as they want, they just don't want to use it that much that it impacts on other users.

My main point is that our platform is being built with the sort of usage the OP has quoted in mind, and being able to deliver these services is a big driver in why we are building the platform now.
N/A

The future of P2P

but how is this system going to work if p2p is restricted?
Alecto
Grafter
Posts: 2,886
Registered: 30-07-2007

The future of P2P

Thank you Ben. Sorry for the sarcasm, but I go on what people do, not what on they say, and it is a total nonsense to say on the one hand that you don't mind people using P2P and then on the other hand to throttle it.

I'm all in favour of your discouraging big users by throttling them, but your current strategy is affecting big and small alike. I, and most others I suspect, would rather you singled out the customers you don't want and restricted them/asked them to leave, than inconvenience everybody.

But there you go, I'm only a customer.
Ben_Brown
Grafter
Posts: 2,839
Registered: 13-06-2007

The future of P2P

Quote
but how is this system going to work if p2p is restricted?


We can identify different applications over our network, not just if it is p2p or not.
N/A

The future of P2P

Quote
Quote
but how is this system going to work if p2p is restricted?


We can identify different applications over our network, not just if it is p2p or not.


Ah, i see. That explains why emule doesnt work then :lol: (Sorry i couldnt resist!)
Julie
Grafter
Posts: 791
Registered: 28-07-2007

The future of P2P

Quote
it is a total nonsense to say on the one hand that you don't mind people using P2P and then on the other hand to throttle it.
.

I have to agree with this.
As I have posted in another thread
I wanted to use p2p last night for a file I wanted and I hardly ever use it
I gave up in the end as I do not consider 3KB/S acceptable for my 2meg connection., and did not fancy waiting for the file to download at this speed for the approx 7 hours it said it would take...it was only a 358mb file
Don't you think that this is managing the network a little too much ?
craigbrass
Grafter
Posts: 1,009
Registered: 30-07-2007

The future of P2P

Personally I do not see what you guys are gryping about. I use P2P as and when I need to. I had 5 downloads going tuther day on bittorrent and it was downloading at aroung 220kbps total which is full connection usage. This was at peak time. I have also tried it at other intervals and it is around the same assuming I choose a download that has alot of sources.
Julie
Grafter
Posts: 791
Registered: 28-07-2007

The future of P2P

Craig

I am pleased that you are getting full speeds Smiley
I was not complaining, merely stating the fact that the speeds were very poor on the very rare occasion that I chose to use it.
N/A

The future of P2P

You also have to look at the economics of a situation to throw huge amounts of capacity at cost at the current majority of p2p makes no sense as it would eat masses of capacity and capital and as we are commited to not raising ptices for our customers and delivering at low cost we would not be able to get any of this back. This leads to an unsustainable business model and not something which helps any customers or ourselves.

Of course as the protocols and delivery methods become more mainstream or are used in a different manner this leads to a more realistic way of funding the increased capacity that we will of course provision.

Ultimately though this will still be under a model of a well managed and correctly provisioned network.
Alecto
Grafter
Posts: 2,886
Registered: 30-07-2007

The future of P2P

Looks like "jam tomorrow" then.