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So much for 'Free'

Billy_Love
Dabbler
Posts: 13
Registered: 31-07-2007

So much for 'Free'

Years ago (6 or more) I was given a 'free' domain when I joined, so now I am thinking of leaving I asked how could I take my domain with me? Pay £45 the man said! It was also implied in the response why was I complaining about the dl speeds when I had managed to dl 14 GB and up 17GB! By leaving it running 24/7 I said, even when I didn't want to, especially during peak!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Evil
16 REPLIES
Firejack
Grafter
Posts: 921
Registered: 26-06-2007

So much for 'Free'

Let me guess. The free domain was the one you got with the Unlimited Dial-up package? Yea, I got burned by that one too :roll: I didn't click on link to cancel the domain within the first two years so the dam thing was up for renew and I had to pay.
One of the very many examples of cynical small print Plus.net write into their contracts. Really think their should be a law against advertising something as free when in fact its going to cost you money in a few years.
Really annoys me that Plus.net are using the same language in their contracts today. Why can't they just be honest and up front. Clearly state the details when you sign up instead of hiding the information in the small print and terms & conditions.
You'll have to do what I did in the end. Chalk it up to experience and pay the money. Then read and read again all the terms from when you signed up to Plus.net.
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So much for 'Free'

I'm afraid there are lots of things that Plusnet advertise as free when you sign up but hide their interpretation of the word FREE deep in the terms and conditions to deliberately mislead the customers.

It's a very underhanded way of making extra money from the customers but we're all stuffed, there's nothing we can do about it apparently.

... apart from complaining to OFCOM, Trading Standards, Advertising Standards Agency.
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So much for 'Free'

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[snip].... there's nothing we can do about it apparently.

... apart from complaining to OFCOM, Trading Standards, Advertising Standards Agency.


Erm, or reading the small print before signing a contract.

No help in hindsight, but a useful lesson for the future. Wink

I ain't saying I agree with the way they [PN] word their contracts and offers etc, but in every case I've seen, the info has been there somewhere. If the info wasn't there on signing the contract, they [PN] can't enforce it. (Unless they gave you notice that the contract has changed, and given you the option to terminate it early)
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So much for 'Free'

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No help in hindsight, but a useful lesson for the future. Wink


Tell me about it! I won't be making that mistake again.
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So much for 'Free'

Actually, I consider that the word "FREE" should be disallowed in ALL contracts. There's no such thing as "FREE".
"Without extra charge" would be much more appropriate and implies that a charge could have been or may be levied.

I presume that PN want to charge you for a domain that they generated?

I certainly don't think there is any charge to move a domain that is registered elsewhere, and is being hosted by PN.
Billy_Love
Dabbler
Posts: 13
Registered: 31-07-2007

So much for 'Free'

Yes, it was generated by them when I signed up, now I am thinking of leaving I wanted to move it and I've been told it will cost £45 (plus vat I think) hence the 'so much for free' comment....
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So much for 'Free'

Quote
Erm, or reading the small print before signing a contract.


Erm, or stopping letting companies get away with redefining common words/terms/phrases [like "free", "unlimited", "customer service" and "the smarter way to broadband"] in their small print. It's misleading and disingenuous. I know that it is legal - but that doesn't make it right [hell, there are some fun local bylaws here in York that I'm sure I couldn't get away with acting on using the defence of "but law XYZ said it was OK..."]. Of course this is not specific to PlusNet, but "well, everyone else does it" wasn't a valid excuse in the playground [at least not when I wer' lad] and it shouldn't be here either.

Making a noise about these issues publicly and via the relevant regulatory bodies would have an effect if enough people did it - the effect being to raise the general public awareness of the issue, and increases the chance that one day someone in authority will care enough [and by "care enough" I mean "considers there to be enough votes in it to make the hassle worth while"] to find an effective way of putting their foot down and stop companies getting away with this sort of crap.

I suppose it all comes down to the following definition:
"Company (noun): A legal entity with all the rights of an individual but not of the moral responsibilities."
[with apologies to who-ever I've just badly quoted/paraphrased]
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So much for 'Free'

Wow. I didn't expect to see the word crap get automatically censored like that. It's not as if it is a generally taboo word bastard, fuck or cunt...

The use of <censored> actually makes my feelings sound stronger than using a serious expletive could have done. I wonder exactly how sad it makes me, that I find this amusing?!
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So much for 'Free'

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Making a noise about these issues publicly and via the relevant regulatory bodies would have an effect if enough people did it


It's a simple form we could all fill out if we fell the adverts are misleading:

http://www.asa.org.uk/asa/how_to_complain/complaints_form/

Takes no more than 5 minutes.
csogilvie
Grafter
Posts: 5,852
Registered: 04-04-2007

So much for 'Free'

I believe the ASA does not cover companies websites.
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So much for 'Free'

It does cover sales promotions though.

If that fails, Trading Standards it is.
James
Grafter
Posts: 21,036
Registered: 04-04-2007

So much for 'Free'

Considering that TalkTalk and Sky are allowed to advertise 'free' broadband, I don't realistically see them battering an eyelid.

I do take on board what you are saying though.
Community Veteran
Posts: 2,848
Thanks: 156
Fixes: 2
Registered: 05-04-2007

So much for 'Free'

I agree with the points about PlusNet, they like to use the word 'free' when it really isn't .. but it's not like they are the only company doing it.

Tiscali use the word 'unlimited', with an asterisk - when you look at the small print it states that there is a cap and what it is. This is obviously a definition of the word unlimited to which I am not familiar.

How they are allowed to advertise like this I don't know. Unfortunately the ASA are about as useful as a chocolate teapot and despite previous complains in this area, they still allow Shiscali to get away with it !?!? Can't rememeber where the link was (from where I read this) now. There's me thinking they exist to deal with incorrect and misleading advertising...

Nope - in fact they'd rather stamp on PC World for advertising FM transmitters for iPods too early (since they're not legal let, but will be in December).
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So much for 'Free'

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Yes, it was generated by them when I signed up, now I am thinking of leaving I wanted to move it and I've been told it will cost £45 (plus vat I think) hence the 'so much for free' comment....


'Fraid I had this problem with Freenetname. It was free when I stayed with them and cost me to move it to Plusnet. However I kicked up such a stink, they backed down.

Nominet, Trading Standards, Sunday Times, Auntie Beeb.......

Worth a try. Wink