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AndyR
Grafter
Posts: 51
Registered: 07-08-2007

Pages slow to load

Recently I have changed to uTorrent and used scheduler to not download between 1600 and 2400.
When I try to download during these times I cannot get any speed and the http is abysmal, cutting out with no pages loading.
Turning uTorrent off and surfing causes no problems between 1600 and 2400, pages load OK.
Edit - forgot to say surf and download OK outside the hours quoted. end edit
Doing some speed tests wireless and ethernet gives some remarkable results:

Wireless


Ethernet


Wireless


Ethernet - impressive


Whilst downloading P2P packets, HTTP fails

I have learnt another lesson - never too old to learn

regards
Andrew
Lost Series 3 is out on Thurdays...
10 REPLIES
Community Veteran
Posts: 26,341
Thanks: 598
Fixes: 8
Registered: 10-04-2007

Pages slow to load

Looking at those wireless results I suggest you make sure that the MTU on the router is equal or larger than the MTU on the wireless PC.
jelv (a.k.a Spoon Whittler)
   Why I have left Plusnet (warning: long post!)   
Broadband: Andrews & Arnold Home::1 (FTTC 80/20)
Line rental: Pulse 8 Home Line Rental (£13/month)
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AndyR
Grafter
Posts: 51
Registered: 07-08-2007

Pages slow to load

Elvin
The MTU on the router [192.168.1.1] was on auto, I have changed this to manual and set it at 1500. Is what you mean to check?

regards
Andrew
Community Veteran
Posts: 26,341
Thanks: 598
Fixes: 8
Registered: 10-04-2007

Pages slow to load

You obviously have a different router, but that sounds right. Has it made any difference? (fingers crossed for you)
jelv (a.k.a Spoon Whittler)
   Why I have left Plusnet (warning: long post!)   
Broadband: Andrews & Arnold Home::1 (FTTC 80/20)
Line rental: Pulse 8 Home Line Rental (£13/month)
Mobile: iD mobile (£4/month)
Uncle_Meat
Grafter
Posts: 167
Registered: 04-08-2007

Pages slow to load

Just a quick thought on top of that good MTU advice.


Your wireless connection, is it 802.11b or 11g?

Also, what kind of signal quality do you get?


I ask as 11b, which is nominally supposed to be 11Mbps (signalling speed) at best, gives an actual thoughtput (download speed) of around 6Mb or thereabouts. If you have an iffy signal with 11b, this could drop signalling to say 5.5Mb for example, with an associated drop in throughput. And so on. 11b can drop to 2Mbps or even 1Mbps signalling, which will be quite a bit slower than your line can support by the looks of it!


HTH?
N/A

Pages slow to load

I'd also be interested to hear what wireless hardware you are using to connect.

Centrino Wireless Chips, for example, are reasonably well known to apply their own silly power saving rules, resulting in lousy throughput, even when the link status tells you its connected at a far higher rate than your ADSL is capable of (54Mbps)

Fortuitously the settings can be changed to force it to work sensibly.

I've found that the Netgear and Belkin USB WiFi Dongles perform at a similar rate to an ethernet cable (when talking about ADSL Download speeds - obviously currently you can only get around half the throughput on WiFi ATM Wink )
N/A

Pages slow to load

Quote
I ask as 11b, which is nominally supposed to be 11Mbps (signalling speed) at best, gives an actual thoughtput (download speed) of around 6Mb or thereabouts.


Erm, yup - you fell for the sales jargon didn't you!

The marketing peeps decided to pull a fast one when talking about wireless speeds. 11Mbps WiFi is 5 each direction, lousy when compared to 100Mbps wired connections, which will give you 100Mbps both ways.

The fact that wireless is only half-duplex also means that content inevitably ends up being buffered, which can confuse things even more, and make performance look even worse.


Please excuse the age of the quote (04) but its an old problem! - When it refers to 'Standard WiFi' it means the standard then, 802.11b (Advertised as - 11Mbps)
Quote
Anybody who describes ordinary Wi-Fi as carrying 11 megabits per second is, technically, correct. But the payload on 802.11b is half that; 5 megabits - and that's shared amongst all users. Also, the rate drops as you move away from the access point; 802.11b drops back to one megabit when the signal gets weak.

As a rule of thumb, if you take the Wi-Fi standard bitrate, you can work out the payload easily enough by dividing by two. Rarely, it will be faster; usually, a lot less. Put two access points on the same channel in the same area, and it can be so much less you may even wonder if you're connected.


source...
AndyR
Grafter
Posts: 51
Registered: 07-08-2007

Pages slow to load

Latest test done on Dusseldorf - better readings considering the time of day - net is always busier in the evening.




As for b or g setting it is 802.11g signal strength excellent, speed 54Mbps. Wireless security managed by McAfee Wireless Security

Linksys wireless router WAG54GS, firmware 1.0.08 and Hello Tosh gotta Toshiba laptop

regards
Andrew
N/A

Pages slow to load

What about the wireless on the Laptop?

Is it Centrino, or something else?
AndyR
Grafter
Posts: 51
Registered: 07-08-2007

Pages slow to load

Hiya

Wireless on Toshiba is INTEL PRO/Wireless 3945 ABG
Ethernet is Realtek RTL8139/810x

regards
Andrew
Uncle_Meat
Grafter
Posts: 167
Registered: 04-08-2007

Pages slow to load

Quote
Quote
I ask as 11b, which is nominally supposed to be 11Mbps (signalling speed) at best, gives an actual thoughtput (download speed) of around 6Mb or thereabouts.


Erm, yup - you fell for the sales jargon didn't you!

The marketing peeps decided to pull a fast one when talking about wireless speeds. 11Mbps WiFi is 5 each direction, lousy when compared to 100Mbps wired connections, which will give you 100Mbps both ways.

The fact that wireless is only half-duplex also means that content inevitably ends up being buffered, which can confuse things even more, and make performance look even worse.


Please excuse the age of the quote (04) but its an old problem! - When it refers to 'Standard WiFi' it means the standard then, 802.11b (Advertised as - 11Mbps)
Quote
Anybody who describes ordinary Wi-Fi as carrying 11 megabits per second is, technically, correct. But the payload on 802.11b is half that; 5 megabits - and that's shared amongst all users. Also, the rate drops as you move away from the access point; 802.11b drops back to one megabit when the signal gets weak.

As a rule of thumb, if you take the Wi-Fi standard bitrate, you can work out the payload easily enough by dividing by two. Rarely, it will be faster; usually, a lot less. Put two access points on the same channel in the same area, and it can be so much less you may even wonder if you're connected.


source...





Heh. Well, that was my point. Smiley

Wireless=Smoke and mirrors to confuddle Joe Public.

Looking at the OP's wireless speedtest results, they could easily have been 11b running for all it's worth at 5.5Mbps signalling.