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Neil Armstrong on Newsnight

Community Veteran
Posts: 26,339
Thanks: 595
Fixes: 8
Registered: 10-04-2007

Neil Armstrong on Newsnight

There was a short interview with Neil on Newsnight last night as part of an item about the problems with BitTorrent encryption for the security services.

Link

Fast forward to around 22:30
jelv (a.k.a Spoon Whittler)
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27 REPLIES
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Neil Armstrong on Newsnight

So terrorism is all PNs fault because they restrict torrent speeds?

Seems to be some vague and wooly arguments going on here.
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Neil Armstrong on Newsnight

i noticed he said that bittorrent takes up 50% of the network at peak times, and if left unchecked would take up 100% of the network,
this means that at peak times they are throttling bittorrent by at least 50%,
i thought it was supposed to be alot less than that.
Bernard_Shakey
Grafter
Posts: 243
Registered: 31-07-2007

Neil Armstrong on Newsnight

All the +net Hi heid yins must be sitting at home now getting very, very excited. It's now official - ISP's must restrict BT at peak times. This interview is akin to the royal seal of approval for restricting torrenting @ peak times.

BTW, I've just turned off the encryption in uTorrent 1.4.1B. If this helps the CIA to catch Bin Laden, then I've done my little bit. Knock yourself out Dubya, I may just turn you on to some groovy music in the process :roll:

Dave...heavy (unencrypted) user...man, er sorry, sir....

(to the tune of old McDonald) Oh, Old Dick Cheney had a plan, O-I-O-I-L...

www.dimeadozen.org

Moderator's note by Mark (pcsni)Vulgar remark removed. These boards are family orientated and comments / words such as that are not welcome. ]
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Neil Armstrong on Newsnight

langtang,

While I whole heartedly and fully support the freedom of speech and enjoy others being able to voice their opinions I have to say that this little choice of wording is a little vulger even for me

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must be sitting at home now with huge Link:Censored


On another note did no-one find it strange that the head of Marketing was doing the interview and was explaining the problems with Bittorent on the network as apposed to a Networks member?
I would say 90% of the motive was publicity and advertising. But still, it has now bitten Plusnet in the rear end as it was mentioned ( with some candy thrown in round the edges ) on how to "AVOID" falling foul of the slowdown.

Most already know, and for those who dont, this has got to be a plain "Well this is how you do it see" for them. I dare say personel at the golf balls will thank newsnight for showing the nation on how to make their job harder lol.

Anyway nuff said, thats me over and out.
Community Veteran
Posts: 38,207
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Registered: 15-06-2007

Neil Armstrong on Newsnight

Just to add a bit of background see this from ADSLGuide
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Hi there,

It was recorded about two weeks ago at BBC radio studios in Sheffield. I was quite suprised by the headline of the article being about terrorists and paedophiles as that had nothing to do with what I was interviewed about! Hence the view that this 'looked like it was slotted in'.

I'd had a discussion for about 20 minutes or so about how filesharing worked, why people use it, how it's got so popular, what effect it has on the network, how we manage it, whether encryption makes it impossible for us to manage it etc etc..

Have to say I was quite suprised by the rest of the article, but I suppose that's the magic of TV :-)

Kind Regards,

--
Neil Armstrong
plusnet Marketing

Shows what the BBC get up to in their editing studio doesn't it
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Naughty Language, (and the death of common sense).

PlusNet should immediately filter out all uses of vulgarities such as *n and h*rd.

Lets not be half-hearted about this.

At the same time I applaud the restrictions being made on P2P and Torrent transfers, it's about time that the primary reason for the ISP explosion was nipped in the bud.

:lol:
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Neil Armstrong on Newsnight

BBC Link if you want the piece in RealPlayer.

[Moderator's note by Mark (pcsni): Shortened link as it was stretching the page badly
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Neil Armstrong on Newsnight

Ah yes, everyone who uses encrypted data must be a peadophile or terrorist.. sigh.
In that case most government agencies are full of them and have been for years... oh wait Wink First they said that buying pirated material financed terrorists and drug dealers, now they're spreading the misinformation and scare tactics.

For one thing, if the listening stations are purely looking for encrypted data, they aren't being very intelligent about their intelligence gathering! For another, I'm confident that the Ellacoya's and other traffic monitoring equipment will soon, if they can't already, be able to identify encrypted P2P data. Not it's content, but that's it's P2P data rather than an SSH connection, SSL encrypted web/mail traffic or encrypted VPN link.

In an ideal world, everything would be open, there would be no need for encryption. But we don't live in an ideal world and personal privacy is very important IMHO. This sort of FUD on a programme like Newsnight is quite scary.

I wonder if Neil was told that his newsbite was going to be used in a slur on the internet, it's users and crptography. But yeh, good free publicity Smiley
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Neil Armstrong on Newsnight

An interesting piece. But what a crock to say that restrictions have been put in place because BT uses up 50% of the network - and then to extend those restrictions to every other p2p.
JonathanW
Grafter
Posts: 2,648
Registered: 02-10-2007

Neil Armstrong on Newsnight

Whilst the interview was about Bit Torrent, similar issues are present with other p2p traffic, though some variations are worse than others due to the way that they are written.

If BT was the only application causing problems then it would be easy enough to just reduce the ammount of traffic on that protocol rather than targeting all of them.
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Neil Armstrong on Newsnight


Good scoop for Pnetters...

It's interesting because it does tie in quite neatly with what Tim Thorne, who was a Senior Network Engineer at PN until recently, stated in his adsl posting and was elaborated to a larger audience on Plusnetters recently. Smiley

PlusNet needs more capacity, it's as simple as that. If customers choose to circumnavigate the restrictions using encryption that is their choice; it's not against any terms or conditions; law of the land or whatever; customers of any isp will squeeze the last from their connections: it's human nature.

Does it hurt the isp if customers compress their data? I don't think so.
After all said and done, zip and gzip files etc., have become the norm. PGP has also become the norm, combine the two and you have a faster connection... And we all want to make the connection work for us don't we?

The comparison between providing less capacity on PlusNet and the following statement: '... to get round the restrictions down-loaders are starting to encrypt their files which could make monitoring internet traffic for paedophiles, or for that matter terrorists, virtually impossible'; is utterly ridiculous.

Where will it end if it's allowed that that sort of reasoning can prevail?
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Neil Armstrong on Newsnight

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Does it hurt the isp if customers compress their data? I don't think so.
After all said and done, zip and gzip files etc., have become the norm. PGP has also become the norm, combine the two and you have a faster connection...

Sorry, I'm confused at to what point is being made here. What has this all got to do with compression? zip/gzip are compression tools not encryption tools and PGP is a cryptography tool. Compressing data before sending it across a network connection will decrease the amount of traffic, encrypting it with PGP or a DES or other cipher tool will not.
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Neil Armstrong on Newsnight

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Sorry, I'm confused at to what point is being made here. What has this all got to do with compression? zip/gzip are compression tools not encryption tools and PGP is a cryptography tool. Compressing data before sending it across a network connection will decrease the amount of traffic, encrypting it with PGP or a DES or other cipher tool will not.


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The show focused on how users are starting to fight back by encrypting and tunnelling Bit Torrent traffic in an attempt to get around the restrictions placed upon it. This is causing problems for the intelligence agencies to counteract terrorism and paedophilia via the internet with the amount of encrypted traffic on the internet growing.


Sorry I confused you. Wink
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Neil Armstrong on Newsnight

Having just watched the video, it appeared to raise 2 points for me.

+net appear to be "link:censored it" about the use of encryption. I thought that Skynet a.k.a the Hellacoyas were able to decypher the encryption, or at least negate the effects of it and still throttle p2p apps? Is this still the case or have they blown a stack of cash on a pretty little blinky flashy lights device for their racks?

Secondly, to the general public watching the show, it appeared that the producers were attempting to put filesharers in the same category as terrorists and paedophiles! For years we had the stories of "illegal CDs at car boot sales are all linked to organised crime, terrorists and drug dealers" coming from the authorities. Now the public eye is on paedophilia, and rightly so, but to label filesharers as quasi-paedophiles is plain wrong.

While I understand to fear that more traffic being encrypted will mean a larger strain on resources, are the authorities now about to make encryption illegal on the Internet? What about the traffic over corporate VPNs? Will this become illegal?

As the presenter said, "The filesharing community is fighting back." Note the use of the word filesharing.....not terrorists or drug dealers or paedophiles......filesharers.

The ones who fear this BT encryption technology are the record labels, the movie studios and the software houses. They have inflated prices for years, leading to the explosion in filesharing meanwhile relying on ISPs to reduce the ability to share these files and through their own inaction, i.e reducing the price of their goods, have lead us to this point. Perhaps now we will see a shift in their attitude to screwing over customers.

[Moderator's note by Tom (tomspcs): Please DO NOT substitute other words for swear words to avoid the filter.]